Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-02-2009, 03:29 AM   #16
Veteran Member
roentarre's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 11,794
Ditto, the film look is just soooo special there.

03-02-2009, 04:15 AM   #17
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Philippines
Posts: 1,399
I love the look of film. Thanks for sharing Simon!
03-02-2009, 10:38 PM   #18
Pentaxian
jgredline's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: LosAngeles, Ca.
Photos: Albums
Posts: 10,587
QuoteOriginally posted by ftpaddict Quote
You just can't beat that film look...
Agreed!!! Film can also be very addicting...
03-03-2009, 02:53 AM   #19
Veteran Member
Mechan1k's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,889
Original Poster
Mike ... I actually didn't think abot adding noise/grain ... I actually took it back out of that image ... and I did richen the contrast a bit as well .... it was a lot duller than what i posted.

03-03-2009, 09:02 PM   #20
Senior Member




Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 178
great pics. I fell in love with my spotmatics. theyre so cheap, I got one just to take apart and put back together, and it survived. It is amazing how expensive a "free" spotmatic can get though

good luck on your journey with film!
03-05-2009, 06:53 AM   #21
Veteran Member
Mike Cash's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Japan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 6,952
QuoteOriginally posted by Mechan1k Quote
Mike ... I actually didn't think abot adding noise/grain ... I actually took it back out of that image ... and I did richen the contrast a bit as well .... it was a lot duller than what i posted.
The only thing I did was to adjust the white balance and the shadows side of the levels (there was a lot of blank space over there, meaning your blacks weren't coming out black). I run all my film scans through LR2 for at least those two adjustments.
03-06-2009, 08:28 AM   #22
Ira
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Coral Springs, FL
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,218
If I were you, I would stay away TOTALLY from shooting indoor with a flash for a while, and here's the intro explanation on most intro level auto flashes:

There are no settings on many of the inexpensive ones, except for maybe 1/2 power, 1/4 power, etc. There MIGHT be an auto/manual setting, where the auto adjusts the amount of light output (see below) and the manual fires at full blast and you adjust the aperture based on doing math.

So for auto, there's a chart on the flash, you look up the ASA/ISO speed you're shooting, and match up the F stop it says for your film, and leave it at that stop. The flash has a little eye which reads the available light before firing and adjusts for proper exposure.

The problem with shooting with auto flashes as a beginner is you don't learn anything, and the results are usually disappointing. Not only is the light flat or too stark or whatever without proper techniques (bouncing, diffusion), but you also have no idea about what will happen with shadows.

You are much better off sticking with outdoor shooting for now, and maybe playing with a flash for fill. But for indoor, get yourself some inexpensive lights (not strobes), however they're balanced and use the matching film/ This is truly the fun part of photography, because here you are painting with light and can move those lights to different effect--plus using bounce and diffusion techniques and see your composition before pulling the trigger.

A flash is just a flash unless you really know how to use them properly, and it's not easy. You will have more fun, better results, and save money by sticking with continuous lighting for interior for now.

And yeah, you can use high speed films and available light (no extra lighting), but unless you really take your time and set up your shots for good effect, the results are never that great for beginners.
03-07-2009, 07:19 AM   #23
Veteran Member
Mike Cash's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Japan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 6,952
Piggybacking on Ira's sage comments: Do your flash learning on digital. It will save you tons of money.

03-07-2009, 08:09 AM   #24
Veteran Member
Steinback's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: GTA, ON, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,673
I've been meaning to post this for a couple days, the results of about 30 seconds of playing around in photoshop 6.0. Auto contrast and a minor tweak to brightness.



Following along the lines of Mike and Ira's comments, the amount of information available online right now about flashes helped a lot but I learned more in a few weeks of playing around with flashes on digital than I did with years of shooting with flash on film. The ability to see your results immediately and then adjust your flash set up helps immensely.
03-07-2009, 08:37 AM   #25
Veteran Member
artobest's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Swansea, Wales
Posts: 455
QuoteOriginally posted by Steinback Quote
I've been meaning to post this for a couple days, the results of about 30 seconds of playing around in photoshop 6.0. Auto contrast and a minor tweak to brightness.
Nice shot, but I've just said this on another thread and I'll repeat it here at the risk of becoming boring: please stay away from contrast and brightness, especially in older (pre-CS3) versions of Photoshop. Levels and Curves give much better results, since you can manually set white and black points (ie, can avoid blowing out your highlights or squashing your shadows). And most importantly, make all your adjustments on adjustment layers until you're 110 percent sure you've got them right.
03-12-2009, 08:55 PM   #26
Veteran Member
Mechan1k's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,889
Original Poster
I have CS3 here that I can play with ... but it comes down to my lack of skill with it .... but I d occasionally play with curves though as I find I do get better results.
03-12-2009, 08:59 PM   #27
Veteran Member
Mechan1k's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,889
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
If I were you, I would stay away TOTALLY from shooting indoor with a flash for a while, and here's the intro explanation on most intro level auto flashes:

There are no settings on many of the inexpensive ones, except for maybe 1/2 power, 1/4 power, etc. There MIGHT be an auto/manual setting, where the auto adjusts the amount of light output (see below) and the manual fires at full blast and you adjust the aperture based on doing math.

So for auto, there's a chart on the flash, you look up the ASA/ISO speed you're shooting, and match up the F stop it says for your film, and leave it at that stop. The flash has a little eye which reads the available light before firing and adjusts for proper exposure.

The problem with shooting with auto flashes as a beginner is you don't learn anything, and the results are usually disappointing. Not only is the light flat or too stark or whatever without proper techniques (bouncing, diffusion), but you also have no idea about what will happen with shadows.

You are much better off sticking with outdoor shooting for now, and maybe playing with a flash for fill. But for indoor, get yourself some inexpensive lights (not strobes), however they're balanced and use the matching film/ This is truly the fun part of photography, because here you are painting with light and can move those lights to different effect--plus using bounce and diffusion techniques and see your composition before pulling the trigger.

A flash is just a flash unless you really know how to use them properly, and it's not easy. You will have more fun, better results, and save money by sticking with continuous lighting for interior for now.

And yeah, you can use high speed films and available light (no extra lighting), but unless you really take your time and set up your shots for good effect, the results are never that great for beginners.

I do find flash confusing to say the least ... as with digital I ust use it in Auto really ... and learn nothing from it (although i do play with bounce/swivel though .... but that's about all)

When shooting indoors though I do try and increase the amount of ambient light as possible so that I don't need to use flash (I rarely do as it is with digital).
Thanks for the info.
03-12-2009, 09:58 PM   #28
Veteran Member
Steinback's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: GTA, ON, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,673
Actually, my regular workflow for scans is just setting levels manually in photoshop. I don't particulary like retouching (too lazy?) so the only other step I might take is clone stamping out particularly bad dust spots if they are somewhere distracting.
03-13-2009, 02:10 AM   #29
Veteran Member
Mike Cash's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Japan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 6,952
QuoteOriginally posted by Mechan1k Quote
I have CS3 here that I can play with ... but it comes down to my lack of skill with it .... but I d occasionally play with curves though as I find I do get better results.
Pop open the Levels thingy as well. It should display a histogram, if it is like other programs (I don't have CS3). If you see a lot of blank space over to the left, adjust your black point to snug it up. You'll see a big improvement. Nice to do the white point to the right as well, but not if you have to move it a lot. You can end up overstretching and getting some posterization that way.
03-13-2009, 03:20 AM   #30
Veteran Member
Mechan1k's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,889
Original Poster
Thanks for the tips Mike ... I'll have a play around with the histogram.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
film, images, shots
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stupid 120 film developing question - paper back removal. ytterbium Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 10 04-11-2012 01:17 PM
The Economist analyzes Republicans' plans to roll back Obama's health plan: Oops!! deadwolfbones General Talk 12 11-05-2010 10:14 AM
Wanted - Acquired: Large Format: 4x5 120 Roll Film Back stevebrot Sold Items 0 03-20-2010 10:28 PM
Developing my first roll of B&W. jbrowning Pentax Film SLR Discussion 13 01-31-2009 02:00 PM
Developing 110 fillerupmac Pentax Film SLR Discussion 2 12-13-2008 08:04 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:18 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top