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03-01-2009, 11:53 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Venturi Quote
If you don't have a local lab that can develop "professional" B&W film and you don't want to mess with developing it yourself - give Dwayne's Photo a try.

I'm pretty sure shipping would cost me more than developing. I live on the far side of Europe.

03-01-2009, 01:01 PM   #17
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well seems you'll have to learn to develop yourself
Maybe you can find products from Fotokemika (Croatia) or Foma (Chezck republic)
Otherwise a good order from macodirect.de for 1st time and then you can make your own developer
03-01-2009, 01:39 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ratmagiclady Quote
Well, the first chromogenic film, XP1, was originally actually kind of billed as a sort of wonder-film for serious photographers who might take advantage of all the minilabs springing up. It didn't live up to the grandiose promises of exposure latitude, never mind actually being very good. There was one fun thing, though. I worked at a place with a really overqualified printing machine guy, he could 'tone' the stuff however you wanted. (This man was a genius. Color-corrected near every print that went through the machine by eye, with barely a discernible pause) Only time I ever saw the stuff look *good,* and it still was hardly the same as true B&W.

I have a friend who has actually gotten some pleasing results out of the Kodak CN400... the big issue there is that you don't get a conventionally-printable negative, but they seem to scan OK. Still... Not the same thing. Real B&W is basically the way to go if at all possible, especially when the choice to shoot film is about other things than the most convenience, for the most part.

It's also not difficult to learn to do your own negs... It's like cooking, ...You can get as involved with it as you like, or do a perfectly competent job just by following simple directions.
I'm very puzzled by the negative comments about chromogenic black and white films appearing in this thread. It appears that these comments are based on prints from colour mini-labs, which is a completely inappropriate way to evaluate black and white films.

Chromogenic black and white films were generally designed for printing in a proper darkroom with real black and white papers. They also scan perfectly well. They are capable of excellent results in competent hands.

Even the first generation XP! was quite sharp with beautiful tonal rendition and lots of exposture latitude, especially for overexposure. It is common practice with chromogenic black and white to expose at ISO settings as low as 100 to improve image quality.

Below is a shot made on XP1 in 1982. Is it soft? Is there anything wrong with the "range" (whatever that is). Is it lacking in contrast? Does it have a strange colour cast?.

This image was scanned with very minor sharpening, and was not sharpened during post-processing. Other corrections included very basic levels and curves
adjustments and minor burning-in of the lower right corner. Looks OK to me.

Cheers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnpoirier/3320285718/sizes/l/
03-01-2009, 01:42 PM   #19
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Oops- forgot to insert image properly in previous posting. Here it is:



03-01-2009, 01:51 PM   #20
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Sorry about that- I'll try the image once more. Still figuring this forum out.
XP1 shot in 1982- see my earlier posting about accuracy of comments re chromogenic black and white.

05-20-2014, 10:42 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by ftpaddict Quote
Ah well... it was worth a shot. Would have been nice if something came out of the developing process. Something other than blank plastic.

Thank you everyone for the replies. I guess I'll just have to find someone to develop B/W film for me.

...or I could try Caffenol.
I was curious about that as well, but after reading all the negative responses here and elsewhere, along with the explanations, I agree, don't do it! LOL

However, I have used caffenol for several months with excellent results! I use Unicolor for my color stuff, Ektar 100 and Portra 160, but all my B/W stuff goes into Caffenol. It scans really well on my Epson V500. I do all my negatives with VueScan in Linux, and even the B/W scans better if I leave it as color negative, not B/W and the settings for Fuji HR 100 gen2.
The B/W scans almost always have a slight sepia tone to them after scanning, which I can convert to mono in GIMP if the subject looks better without the tone.

The Caffenol is VERY forgiving as to time and temp and agitation from my experience. I have read some articles claiming that you can only use it once, and it cannot be stored for more than a few days.

I have run about 10 rolls of 120 through my current batch, and it's been a couple months since I mixed it.
I am about ready to dump it and mix a fresh liter.

Give it a shot! I use 120 size Ultrafine 100 that I get from ebay for about $40 for 10 rolls including shipping.
05-27-2014, 06:47 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by John Poirier Quote
I'm very puzzled by the negative comments about chromogenic black and white films appearing in this thread. It appears that these comments are based on prints from colour mini-labs, which is a completely inappropriate way to evaluate black and white films.

Chromogenic black and white films were generally designed for printing in a proper darkroom with real black and white papers. They also scan perfectly well. They are capable of excellent results in competent hands.

Even the first generation XP! was quite sharp with beautiful tonal rendition and lots of exposture latitude, especially for overexposure. It is common practice with chromogenic black and white to expose at ISO settings as low as 100 to improve image quality.

Below is a shot made on XP1 in 1982. Is it soft? Is there anything wrong with the "range" (whatever that is). Is it lacking in contrast? Does it have a strange colour cast?.

This image was scanned with very minor sharpening, and was not sharpened during post-processing. Other corrections included very basic levels and curves
adjustments and minor burning-in of the lower right corner. Looks OK to me.

Cheers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnpoirier/3320285718/sizes/l/
I'm a fan of XP2 myself and only stopped using it because the curves of Volume of Film Used and Local Places to Process C-41 intersected in such a way as to make it it much more practical to dedicate a couple of jugs under the sink and a niche in the closet under the rarely worn dress clothes to the science of film developing. The grain structure is different than traditionally processed b&w films and there is an argument to made against it on those grounds, but I like it quite a bit. As a bonus, it gives interesting results when until through a traditional b&w process though I wouldn't recommend it if you're looking for classic beauty.
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