Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
12-05-2010, 12:11 AM   #4441
Senior Member




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 268
QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
Matt! Don't take so long next time, those are excellent, especially the first, it fits in perfectly with my current 50s early 60s kick. Picking out the highlights and letting the rest be... in there, really, with B&W latitude... but obscure, that's way cool.
Thanks! more to be posted soon.

12-05-2010, 04:33 AM   #4442
Veteran Member




Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Norfolk, UK
Posts: 578
QuoteOriginally posted by MattC Quote
I am glad I can finally add to this thread - expect to see more in the future!
These two taken with a K1000, 50mm M f1.7 lens, and Tri-X 400

Cheers,
Matt

Great shots Matt. I don't think anything other than Tri-x 400 would have done such a good job. Were you pushing it a couple of stops or do you have a very steady hand?
12-05-2010, 04:54 AM   #4443
Senior Member




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 268
QuoteOriginally posted by Vendee Quote
Great shots Matt. I don't think anything other than Tri-x 400 would have done such a good job. Were you pushing it a couple of stops or do you have a very steady hand?
Thanks - Don't know if I had that much of a steady hand - Ithink shutter speed was around 1/30th or 1/60th. Had I known about pushing the film when I was shooting these, I definitely would have though!
I am pretty happy with the tri-x & D76 combo, although I have yet do do any prints.
12-05-2010, 07:33 AM   #4444
Veteran Member
goddo31's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,295
QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote


still with the mood, Fed-3, J-12, Foma-400, D-76

The nice thing about meterless, or at most manually metered, is you no longer are beholden to the 'correct' exposure. In fact, I've never really caught on to exposure compensation as a way around that. Auto exposure is nice, don't get me wrong, and there are times when meterless I get anxiety attacks... but essentially, you get to pick what you want to expose for. In this case the shack in the bright setting sun. To hell with all the other stuff.
I like this shot, nice tones and it looks like it was great light.
I hear you about the manual exposure. I recently did a car show where the batteries in my MX died and I left the SD card for the digital at home. It forced me to think about the exposure more and keep a fairly close eye on the light conditions around me. As it turned out my exposures came out fine and I feel rather more satisfied with the result. Light meter or not - I was trying to expose for the cars themselves, not worrying too much about the sky or anything much else...

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I agree 100%. There are two exposure maxims that are too easy to ignore with built in, auto-exposure metering:
  1. Measure the values from the subject and place exposure correctly
  2. Once exposure is determined, there is no need to re-meter unless the light or the subject changes
A corollary to the second point is that the light generally does not change that fast.

I have found it amazingly liberating to have done a fair amount of work in the last year with meterless cameras and have seldom found that my exposure was would have benefited from built-in, multi-zone metering.

Steve
Whilst I am still learning (a lot!), I understand that you find it liberating, so do I

QuoteOriginally posted by fearview Quote
student

Pentax Mx + M50 1.7 + superia
Very nice shot IMO, I love how the light highlights your subject. Great work!

QuoteOriginally posted by MattC Quote
Thanks - Don't know if I had that much of a steady hand - Ithink shutter speed was around 1/30th or 1/60th. Had I known about pushing the film when I was shooting these, I definitely would have though!
I am pretty happy with the tri-x & D76 combo, although I have yet do do any prints.
I'm rather excited to see another Aussie film shooter
And I am rather impressed that you didn't push that Tri-X in those shots! Impressive results.

12-05-2010, 09:00 AM   #4445
Veteran Member
goddo31's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,295
More from a car show...

Pentax MX, M20 f/4, Legacy Pro 100 @ 23C in Tmax



Pentax MX, M20 f/4, Legacy Pro 100 @ 23C in Tmax



Pentax MX, M20 f/4, Legacy Pro 100 @ 23C in Tmax



Pentax MX, M20 f/4, Legacy Pro 100 @ 23C in Tmax

12-05-2010, 09:19 AM   #4446
Inactive Account




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 652
QuoteOriginally posted by lbenac Quote
Do you think that Fuji Across 100 will be discontinued like Fuji Neopan 400 was? What I read is that Fuji would not sell the film in single roll but in pack of five. Mind you Fuji at full price is not going to be an option for me.

...
I wouldn't know, but I sure hope not! It's my favorite 100 speed b&W film. Honestly though, I don't trust Fuji to keep anything I like around. They've been killing a lot of stuff in the past year or so and who knows what's next.

QuoteOriginally posted by lbenac Quote
Sundown shot with APX100

Cheers,

Luc
Great! especially like those clouds! Looks like a fire.
12-05-2010, 09:36 AM   #4447
Inactive Account




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 652
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I agree 100%. There are two exposure maxims that are too easy to ignore with built in, auto-exposure metering:
  1. Measure the values from the subject and place exposure correctly
  2. Once exposure is determined, there is no need to re-meter unless the light or the subject changes
A corollary to the second point is that the light generally does not change that fast.

I have found it amazingly liberating to have done a fair amount of work in the last year with meterless cameras and have seldom found that my exposure was would have benefited from built-in, multi-zone metering.


Steve
I read of a method the other day on APUG that seems to work out quite nicely if you have a spot meter. Set your film speed to 4x what you want to shoot at and meter just the spot you want minimum shadow detail. I wouldn't use this technique if I had time to meter the scene correctly, but it works very quickly for handheld stuff. With the right developer/technique the highlights and midtones will take care of themselves, especially if you're scanning.
12-05-2010, 11:26 AM   #4448
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,676
QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote
I read of a method the other day on APUG that seems to work out quite nicely if you have a spot meter. Set your film speed to 4x what you want to shoot at and meter just the spot you want minimum shadow detail. I wouldn't use this technique if I had time to meter the scene correctly, but it works very quickly for handheld stuff. With the right developer/technique the highlights and midtones will take care of themselves, especially if you're scanning.


That would definitely work!


Steve

12-05-2010, 01:39 PM   #4449
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,145
QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote
I read of a method the other day on APUG that seems to work out quite nicely if you have a spot meter. Set your film speed to 4x what you want to shoot at and meter just the spot you want minimum shadow detail. I wouldn't use this technique if I had time to meter the scene correctly, but it works very quickly for handheld stuff. With the right developer/technique the highlights and midtones will take care of themselves, especially if you're scanning.
The old saying meter for the shadows, develop for the highlights works if all your shots on a roll will benefit from that development. And the chances of a roll of 135-36 having more shots under varied light conditions is probably greater than say a 120 roll.

I shoot with a one-degree spot meter all the time. And I find often that I tend to do the opposite with a roll that will be developed normally. I meter for the highlights and let the lowest values fall where they will. Of course it is scene dependent but shots with sky or a lot of textured white values I'd rather not blow them because areas of accent blacks I think look better than blown areas of high values for those situations.
12-05-2010, 02:49 PM   #4450
Inactive Account




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 652
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
That would definitely work!
Steve
Indeed it does! It's a subtle difference compared to spot metering and manually setting the exposure to place the values where you want them, but it allows you to shoot in AV mode for speed and just use the exposure lock. Much easier and more predictable than trying to find a medium gray or letting the meter try and guess for you. The only slight problem is the size of the spot in most cameras are a bit big for any real accuracy.

QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
The old saying meter for the shadows, develop for the highlights works if all your shots on a roll will benefit from that development. And the chances of a roll of 135-36 having more shots under varied light conditions is probably greater than say a 120 roll.
Yes exactly. It's great when you have 36 exposures on a roll that are potentially all over the place in values. It works especially well if you use a 2-bath developer where highlights are held to a finite amount set by the dilution and expansion and contraction happen naturally because of local exhaustion. Like you say, 120 and sheet film would not see as great a benefit and I can imagine traditional development would probably offer better control and results.

QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
I shoot with a one-degree spot meter all the time. And I find often that I tend to do the opposite with a roll that will be developed normally. I meter for the highlights and let the lowest values fall where they will. Of course it is scene dependent but shots with sky or a lot of textured white values I'd rather not blow them because areas of accent blacks I think look better than blown areas of high values for those situations.
That's an interesting technique! I could see that working well if the clouds and sky make the shot.
12-05-2010, 05:16 PM   #4451
Veteran Member
lbenac's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Burnaby, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,313
QuoteOriginally posted by HaroldB Quote
Ibenac,
Nice shot. Looks like you got as much snow as we did down here

Thanks. Did not last long. The previous years we had quite a bit of snow before Christmas.

cheers,

luc
12-05-2010, 05:17 PM   #4452
Veteran Member
lbenac's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Burnaby, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,313
QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote
I wouldn't know, but I sure hope not! It's my favorite 100 speed b&W film. Honestly though, I don't trust Fuji to keep anything I like around. They've been killing a lot of stuff in the past year or so and who knows what's next.



Great! especially like those clouds! Looks like a fire.

Thanks. That is what made me keep the shot.

Cheers,

luc
12-05-2010, 05:26 PM   #4453
Veteran Member
lbenac's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Burnaby, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,313
What about incident metering. I use it often and when appropriate it is pretty much take a reading and then make your shots adjust one stop down or up to taste.
If I use a separate meter then it is either the Pentax spot or then it is incident metering.

Cheers,

Luc
12-05-2010, 05:35 PM   #4454
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,676
QuoteOriginally posted by lbenac Quote
What about incident metering.
I use incident metering quite a bit as well. You don't have the control that a spotmeter gives you, but with an incident meter you have insurance that all values in the scene will fall appropriately relative to 18% gray.


Steve
12-06-2010, 07:24 AM   #4455
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047



Foma 400, D-76, J-12, Fed-3
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
architecture, details, ektar, exposure, film, goats, grandma, hood, kodachrome, kodak, lab, legs, lens, lunch, lx, mx, pentax, phil, photos, post, q7, roll, sarajevo, scans, shot, shots, steve, thanks, tokina, velvia
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
K20D test shots at Lets Go Digital schufosi777 Pentax News and Rumors 6 04-20-2013 11:31 AM
Macro Cool Macro shots derajjjg Post Your Photos! 2 12-27-2009 09:36 PM
Lets see your Moon and Mars shots Igilligan Post Your Photos! 9 12-05-2009 08:55 AM
Way cool bat shots and General Talk 7 10-01-2009 02:54 AM
Cool Shots & Info Fl_Gulfer Post Your Photos! 0 12-10-2007 11:44 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:33 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top