Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-29-2009, 08:55 AM   #1
Veteran Member
OrenMc's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,902
Thinking of shooting film

I see a lot of what seems to be great deals on older 35mm film cameras and have wondered about doing a little of this type of shooting. I have a couple question though before following through.
First and biggest question is about getting film. The availiblity of film is the main concern. I ran into a canon user a month or so back and he said you can't get film anymore. This confuses me because I see a lot of folks here still using thier film cameras. I guess cost of film is another question and to get it processed professionally?

Second question is about the cameras themselves. If I could get some advise on the best cameras to use with film availiblity that would be great. I don't think I want one of the newer ones with AF. I see the LX is one of the pricier ones and am wondering what sets it apart from a lot of the others. The K1000 I see quite often but is it something I would want to upgrade later?

Another question is, I have been pretty much relying on the K20ds metering system and use it in AV most of the time. I know I should get better aquainted with it and to be able to use manual mode for exposure reasons. Anyway, would a light meter be a must in my situation?

Any advice on the beginning adventure if film would be much appreciated.

I already have a few lenses that will work great I believe. I believe this might even help improve my digital experience.

Please forgive because I have been lazy to do much of a search here on possible answers to above questions.


Oren


Last edited by OrenMc; 08-29-2009 at 12:38 PM.
08-29-2009, 09:03 AM   #2
Veteran Member




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,915
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
Please forgive because I have been lazy to do much of a search here on possible answers to above questions.
you had the time to write that post and not enough to go on BH and see if kodak or fuji still produced film?
08-29-2009, 09:15 AM   #3
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047
Your local chain drugstore or supermarket is likely to be selling 35mm film - and with few exceptions (based on taste) all of which will do a wonderful job for fairly cheap. That local chain drugstore may have a minilab that will develop it and give you a CD of ~1500 pixel wide scan, for less than $6 per roll (more, if you also want prints).

You don't need no fancy pro labs and pro films to get the job done, and well.

Cameras, as you don't want the autofocus (good for you!), I'd recommend the Super Program or Program Plus - these are not expensive, they are easily available and usually reliable, and have program and Av (the Super has Tv as well) - so you can use your aperture-ringless lenses (though not directly set aperture on them)...

Back in time from these two you get the ME Supers, MXes, KXes and K1000s... all fine cameras - actually whichever one first shows up at a price and in a condition you want is the best one for you

I am duty bound to mention Spotmatic as really the only camera anyone ever needed, and a thing of beauty. People don't have to start there but may want to work their way back to one.

Please don't allow yourself performance anxiety with film - save that for digital - these days film is for fun and recreation
08-29-2009, 09:19 AM   #4
Veteran Member
Gooshin's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Toronto, the one in Canada.
Posts: 5,611
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
I see a lot of what seems to be great deals on older 35mm film cameras and have wondered about doing a little of this type of shooting. I have a couple question though before following through.
First and biggest question is about getting film. The availiblity of film is the main concern. I ran into a canon user a month or so back and he said you can't get film anymore. This confuses me because I see a lot of folks here still using thier film cameras. I guess cost of film is another question and to get it processed professionally?

Second question is about the cameras themselves. If I could get some advise on the best cameras to use with film availiblity that would be great. I don't think I want one of the newer ones with AF. I see the LX is one of the pricier ones and am wondering what sets it apart from a lot of the others. The K1000 I see quite often but is it something I would want to upgrade later?

Another question is, I have been pretty much relying on the K20ds metering system and use it in AV most of the time. I know I should get better aquainted with it and to be able to use manual mode for exposure reasons. Anyway, would a light meter be a must in my situation?

Any advice on the beggining adventure if film would be much appreciated.

I already have a few lenses that will work great I believe. I believe this might even help improve my digital experience.

Please forgive because I have been lazy to do much of a search here on possible answers to above questions.


Oren
film is still available and plentyfull with lots to choose from, and each one has its own characteristic...

film metering is even better than digital, and if you shoot negative film (as opposed to "slide" or "positive") then you have about 4-5 more DR stops than ANY digital camera, so even if your meter is off, your photo wont show it.

i used a Pentax Super Program, too old for my tastes, right now i'm using a pentax MZ-S and liking it, but there are a few "camera suggestion" threads and it really boils down to using one and seeing if you like it.

only thing to keep in mind is that if you want to maximize your enjoyment, and by that i mean you actually care about the final product, a high quality scanner is a must, and they are expensive.

photo labs will give you shitty low-DR jpegs which eliminate any point to shooting film.

08-29-2009, 09:27 AM   #5
Banned




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Savannah, U.S./Baguio City, P.H.
Posts: 5,979
given your stated wants. I would also recommend either the Super Program or Program Plus. the ME super would be a viable option as well, but maybe not as fitting as one of the aforementioned 'A' series cameras. you could go full manual, but Im not sure that's what you really want to begin with. if so however, I would recommend the MX, if you think your hands are too big (and dont care to use a winder) then I would suggest any of the K series except the K1000. honestly I cant think of any compelling reason to ever suggest a K1000 to anyone. do you have any screw-mount lenses? the spotmatic would be a great choice. but you would still have a battery issue. I wouldnt recommed using a hend held light meter. what would you want to use it for? unless you want to look into screw-mount bodies, for which I would suggest an SV. then you would need a meter. however, that is a world away from the program series and the K mount, for which I think would best suit you.
08-29-2009, 09:31 AM   #6
Veteran Member
OrenMc's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,902
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by k100d Quote
you had the time to write that post and not enough to go on BH and see if kodak or fuji still produced film?
I know that you can get film but what I didn't know is if it was the same that worked in older cameras. I am starting from scratch and my first research I go with my fellow pentaxians whom which are usually very helpful.

Gooshin, you mention photo labs give low dr jpegs. I am not into processing myself at this point so I have fail before I began in this instance?

Thank you for the information all. Its a good start.

Last edited by OrenMc; 08-29-2009 at 09:43 AM.
08-29-2009, 09:35 AM   #7
Banned




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Savannah, U.S./Baguio City, P.H.
Posts: 5,979
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
I know that you can get film but what I didn't know is if it was the same that worked in older cameras. I am stating from scratch and my first research I go with my fellow pentaxians whom which are usually very helpful.
35mm is 35mm. new or old. you will have no problems there. except maybe learning how to load it without screwing it up.
08-29-2009, 10:14 AM   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,915
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
Second question is about the cameras themselves. If I could get some advise on the best cameras to use with film availiblity that would be great. I don't think I want one of the newer ones with AF. I see the LX is one of the pricier ones and am wondering what sets it apart from a lot of the others. The K1000 I see quite often but is it something I would want to upgrade later?

Another question is, I have been pretty much relying on the K20ds metering system and use it in AV most of the time. I know I should get better aquainted with it and to be able to use manual mode for exposure reasons. Anyway, would a light meter be a must in my situation?
i think a good starter would be the ME Super, can be had for cheap for a first go and has Av mode with a manual override.

because negative films have a lot of lattitude for exposure, being a bit off won't really be too detrimental. i've used a bunch of different film cameras and the one i think that needs a handheld meter the most is the K100D

edit: if you want to go all manual, i have a nice MX for sale in the marketplace


Last edited by k100d; 08-29-2009 at 10:52 AM.
08-29-2009, 10:24 AM   #9
Veteran Member
raymeedc's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 951
QuoteOriginally posted by séamuis Quote
the spotmatic would be a great choice. but you would still have a battery issue.
Availability of batteries for the Spotmatic is better than other cameras of the era because the Asahi engineers built a bridge circuit into the metering system which makes it battery voltage independent. This means you can use the original 1.35 mercury PX400 battery, or a 1.5V silver-oxide replacement without problems. An exact fit PX400S is available, or you can use a #392 cell with a small rubber-O ring (purchasable at any fine home repair center or DIY store) as a spacer. I believe a #397 also fits as well.
It baffles me how so many Pentaxians still don't realize or believe this.
08-29-2009, 10:33 AM   #10
Banned




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Savannah, U.S./Baguio City, P.H.
Posts: 5,979
QuoteOriginally posted by raymeedc Quote
Availability of batteries for the Spotmatic is better than other cameras of the era because the Asahi engineers built a bridge circuit into the metering system which makes it battery voltage independent. This means you can use the original 1.35 mercury PX400 battery, or a 1.5V silver-oxide replacement without problems. An exact fit PX400S is available, or you can use a #392 cell with a small rubber-O ring (purchasable at any fine home repair center or DIY store) as a spacer. I believe a #397 also fits as well.
It baffles me how so many Pentaxians still don't realize or believe this.
I was under the impression that this bridge circuit was only on later spotmatics, and so bodies like the SP & SPII would have issues. the reason I bring it up is because (being as I thought this was the case) these two are the usual choices for someone buying their first Spotmatic.

I have an SP, SPII, ESII and I had an F as well, but the only screwmount currently use is the SV. no battery issues there. =) so I dont know for sure on some of the specifics regarding the Spotmatics.
08-29-2009, 10:42 AM   #11
Veteran Member
Gooshin's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Toronto, the one in Canada.
Posts: 5,611
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
I know that you can get film but what I didn't know is if it was the same that worked in older cameras. I am starting from scratch and my first research I go with my fellow pentaxians whom which are usually very helpful.

Gooshin, you mention photo labs give low dr jpegs. I am not into processing myself at this point so I have fail before I began in this instance?

Thank you for the information all. Its a good start.
developing is one thing, scanning is another.

its okay to pay shops to "just process" your film, usualy 2 bucks at costo for C-41 (colour negatives)

pro shops charge around 4-5 bucks for b/w and slides. The developing process has an impact on the product, but these guys usually do a good enough job.

then they just give you the stuff, and you scan it yourself.

if you dont want to bother sitting there scanning photo by photo, then yes, you have failed before you started, because it would be the same as buying a K7 and shooting 1star jpegs all the time.
08-29-2009, 10:53 AM   #12
Banned




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Savannah, U.S./Baguio City, P.H.
Posts: 5,979
if you don't want to worry about the lab people giving you crap quality, ask them to change the chemicals and make sure everything is setup properly. I use a local photo shop for silver halide B&W, but for cheap colour fuji or C41 B&W I use the walgreens down the street. I went in there one day and said "I will be using you guys quite often for colour and B&W C41 process. I will be spending money here regularly, so do me a favor as a customer and change the chemicals and make sure to keep on top of it if you want my continued business in purchasing of and developing film."

they had no problem with that, and its worth a shot if you are worried about quality in any way from developing.
08-29-2009, 10:56 AM   #13
Veteran Member
OrenMc's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,902
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Gooshin Quote
developing is one thing, scanning is another.

its okay to pay shops to "just process" your film, usualy 2 bucks at costo for C-41 (colour negatives)

pro shops charge around 4-5 bucks for b/w and slides. The developing process has an impact on the product, but these guys usually do a good enough job.

then they just give you the stuff, and you scan it yourself.

if you dont want to bother sitting there scanning photo by photo, then yes, you have failed before you started, because it would be the same as buying a K7 and shooting 1star jpegs all the time.
I'm not sure if I really understand this. The way I interpret this is I would only be getting the negitives back from the shops and scan a negitive? I do not undersatnd the idea of scannig a -.
I can't get a good high quality photo for a pro shop?

Thank you seamuis, as gooshin points out what is the point in going with film if I don't get the quality it provides.

Sorry about seeming a bit slow, .... that because I am.

Noone has mention yet what sets the LX apart of the others.

Last edited by OrenMc; 08-29-2009 at 11:04 AM.
08-29-2009, 11:06 AM   #14
Veteran Member
Gooshin's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Toronto, the one in Canada.
Posts: 5,611
I do not undersatnd the idea of scannig a -.

its the same as scanning anything else, you pass light through a medium and you record stuff.

there are special scanners that are designed for film, you put in a frame, you hit the scan button, and off it goes.

all the shops that i know off, do exactly that, they will develop your film, they will scan your film, and then they will print the scanned files.

much faster than before.

if you want to have a shop waste time dark-room printing frame by frame, you are going to be paying top dollar.


since they want to save time money and space, they scan at pretty crappy settings in bulk (An epson V700 can i think scan 24 frames in a single go...), the jpeg quality is not "perfect"

where as doing it yourself with a quality scanner, results in 150 megabyte 64 bitt TIFFS that represent the negative as truthfully as possible, however that is an average of 2 minutes per frame.. so scanning a roll of 36 frames would take you roughly 1 hour once you get the hang of it, and thats before loading them up in lightroom...
08-29-2009, 11:09 AM   #15
Banned




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Savannah, U.S./Baguio City, P.H.
Posts: 5,979
QuoteOriginally posted by OrenMc Quote
I'm not sure if I really understand this. The way I interpret this is I would only be getting the negitives back from the shops and scan a negitive? I do not undersatnd the idea of scannig a -.
I can't get a good high quality photo for a pro shop?
its cheaper to only have the negatives developed. you then take the negative strips home and scan them yourself. you can have a good photo shop do the whole process for you, but you miss out on part of the experience (you are already missing out on the developing) and it will cost you considerably more. you will get much higher resolution scans of your negatives. the comparison with the 1 star JPEG is the low resolution scans you would get at a local 1-hour lab. this is of course all centered around getting a digital copy of your photos for sharing online. if you are more concerned with getting the negatives developed and then printed for your viewing pleasure then it wouldn't really matter. but you wouldn't want to then later try and scan the prints. that would be like trying to PP a P&S quality JPEG vs a DSLR RAW with the negative.


you have three options in general at your 1 hour types (without spending big bucks for analogue enlarging and printing at a photo shop)

developed negatives
developed negatives > low resolution scan
developed negatives > printed

or you can just get the negatives developed, take them home, scan them and share your photos and then keep the negatives and only get the ones you really like (say for framing) printed professionally.

think of the developed negatives as your RAW files.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
cameras, film, lot, question
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Startup cost of Shooting Film little laker Pentax Film SLR Discussion 9 03-28-2010 11:22 AM
HELP! shooting film for a wedding shoey Pentax Film SLR Discussion 3 03-25-2010 05:31 PM
Why I'm shooting film, rather than digital these days. little laker Pentax Film SLR Discussion 59 12-11-2009 10:57 PM
Question for Current or Former film shooting pro's MJB DIGITAL Pentax Film SLR Discussion 4 07-28-2009 01:59 PM
Poll for Current or Former film shooting pro's MJB DIGITAL Pentax Film SLR Discussion 3 07-28-2009 06:22 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:29 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top