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10-08-2009, 06:01 PM   #1
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Help, they say my rolls have nothing on them

So I have shot my first roll with my new to me, but used, super program. I finally got around to dropping it off at wallgreens, when i went to pick it up they said there was nothing on the roll, i came home to find that i gave them a non used roll and the used roll was in its canister on my desk, anyway I dropped that roll off (black and white) with another color roll. I went to pick those up, again they said there was nothing on the rolls. When i take the lens off and release the shutter i see the mirror flip up and I see purple. Why could this be hapenning, I think I am loading the film properly, I followed the original manual that came with it.

Anyone have any insight to my problem?

10-08-2009, 06:07 PM   #2
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If you gave a roll of old fashion B&W then that is the problem. Walgreens only processes C-41 film.
10-08-2009, 06:11 PM   #3
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Did they give you the negatives that "had nothing on them"?

If so, do you see the frame numbers on the negatives? They should be on the edges outside of the perferations.

You said it was black and white film. Was it C-41 process BW or was it silver chemestry?

I am thinking that you gave an inexperianced lab silver chemestry BW film, and they processed it in C-41, and the result is a set of clear negatives. If this is what happened, the frame numbers will be removed from the negatives.

Alternativly, you could have misloaded the film and it was not advancing through the camera. If this was the case, you will have blank negatives, but with the frames numbers at the margines.

Specifically, what type of film was it?
10-08-2009, 06:22 PM   #4
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Well the black and white film I used was Kodak BW400CN which is C-41...
The other roll, which is color, is just Kodak Gold 400


I am thinking I am loading the film incorrectly, though I am pretty sure I am following the diagram in the manual,

here is a picture of the first cut of the negatives


10-08-2009, 06:26 PM   #5
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You misloaded the film.

you should be able to add tension to the rewind crank, then as you advance the roll, the crank should turn.

Then you know the film is loaded correctly.
10-08-2009, 06:33 PM   #6
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Ah, ok, I will figure out how I am messing up with the loading.
thanks a bunch.
10-08-2009, 06:34 PM   #7
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here is a REALLY PAINFULL "how to" on youtube.

Maybe someone with a K-7 could do a better one?

YouTube - Loading Film into a 35mm SLR Camera

Sorry.
10-08-2009, 07:34 PM   #8
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Ah, with that video and taking a second look at the manual I think I can do this now, also my exposure counter was going up to 35, so definitely didn't catch on the right side of the camera.

Thanks for the help.

10-08-2009, 08:29 PM   #9
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Properly loading film

On most film SLR cameras, one sure way to know that the film is loaded properly is to watch the rewind knob/crank.

After you load the film, rewind the film slightly, until you feel resistance. This takes up any slack in the film. Then, as you advance the film after each shot, watch the rewind. It should turn as the film is pulled out of the cannister. If the rewind crank does not turn, you probably have not loaded the film correctly.

On my Spotmatic, my procedure was this: with the camera back open, I thread the film onto to the takeup spool, making sure that it is engaging the sprockets correctly. On the Spotmatic, the takeup has a slot that goes all the way through the spool. I push the film leader all the way through and out the other side, to make sure it engages the takeup spool. With the back still open, I advance the film at least two frames. This is usually enough to see that the film is advancing properly. It also gets the half-width film leader completely onto the takeup, and have full-width film at the sprocket wheel.

Then, I close the camera, and, with the lens cap on, I fire off two more shots. This brings the exposure counter to 1 and brings unexposed film into position. I then take up the slack as described above. For at least the first couple of shots, I check the rewind crank to make sure it is turning. After that, I forget about it.

The process might vary slightly with other cameras, but it should be basically the same for most film cameras.

I think that we all probably wasted a roll or two when we first got our SLR's, in the same way. I know I did, many years ago.
10-08-2009, 10:40 PM   #10
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On my old fashioned 35mm cameras I'd leave the back open, until I physically saw the film advancing.
I may have lost the first shot, however I knew that everything was working right.
10-09-2009, 03:40 AM   #11
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The other tell-tale, though this one's a bit late (but saves the blank film development bit): when you go to rewind, you usually have to crank for quite a while against some resistance (and you can hear the film moving in the camera if you put it to your ear), which when the leader disengages from the take up spool, the cranking gets much easier. Sometimes there's an extra bit of resistance right at the end when the take up spool doesn't want to let go...

Anyway, if you do start to rewind, and you get to the way too easy bit too quick, as in a turn or two, STOP. You want to leave the leader out, so you can curse yourself and whoever designed the stupid 35mm format, and load up again.

--

However, looking at the rewind crank turning when you advance is the best way. Some Pentaxes have a wee indicator for film advance, but I find I don't remember to look at these.
10-09-2009, 06:05 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
...You want to leave the leader out, so you can curse yourself and whoever designed the stupid 35mm format, and load up again...
His name was Oskar Barnack.

I always draw the film entirely back, not leaving anything sticking out from the canister. In that way I cannot easilly take the wrong film and double expose. FIlm is cheap, so there isn't really any point of taking half a roll, take it out and save it for later. Besides, everytime the film pass through the canister there is a risk to scratch the film. Once I develope I use a beer opener to break up the canister. That minimise the risk to scratch the film or make it electrically charged so that it collect more dust.

Feeling sorry for the OP. But we learn from misstakes.Always check that the film advance crank move.

This sort of reminds me of when I (long ago) was responsible for the youth group in the local camera club. There were a boy there who didn't always pay much attention. During a meeting where I was running back and forth between the dark room and the class room, helping kids in different stages when they learned to develop film. As I come out of the dark room into the first illuminated (correct English?) room, this boy (it was soon his turn to develop his film) approach me with his camera...open. Then he shows me the back of the open camera and ask me "Why are there no pictures on the film? I know I've taken a lot of pictures!".

I'm pretty sure I had told them to rewind the film befor opening the camera!
10-09-2009, 06:43 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Douglas_of_Sweden Quote
As I come out of the dark room into the first illuminated (correct English?) room, this boy (it was soon his turn to develop his film) approach me with his camera...open. Then he shows me the back of the open camera and ask me "Why are there no pictures on the film? I know I've taken a lot of pictures!".

I'm pretty sure I had told them to rewind the film befor opening the camera!
LOL aww! that's so sad, at least he learnt his lesson.
10-09-2009, 02:17 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Douglas_of_Sweden Quote
His name was Oskar Barnack.
Oskar Barnack neither invinted 35mm film nor was he the first to use it in a still camera. what he is responsible for is popularizing its use in a still camera and essentially designing the first camera that is the basis for modern 35mm film photography. ie: using it horizontally with a 24x36mm capture area. the camera that very quickly led to Kodak inventing modern "cartridge" film in 1934.

the actual inventor of 35mm film was a french born citizen working in America as a photographer under Thomas Edison. the man was William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, who invented it for the Edisons Kinetoscope project using Kodak 70mm film stock.
10-09-2009, 02:31 PM   #15
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I smile and feel your pain. I have done this more than once. I eventually got into the habit of making sure the rewind lever was turning as the film advanced. I would turn it gently to take up the slack and then watch it turn with the film lever.

Later, when I started to use compact auto everything 35 mm cameras, they had no rewind lever, and I had to trust that the cameras auto loaded correctly.

Might as well warn you about another common goof with film cameras when you use an external flash. Make sure you have the switch set to X sync instead of FP or you only light up half the frame. Shot a whole roll at a retirement party like that once.
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