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12-20-2009, 04:52 PM   #16
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I suppose I should post an update as well!

Curly Stuff That RR100!


This is what my negative sheets looked like at 25% relative humidity. Out of the sleeves, the negs were even MORE curly. The humidity is back up to about 40% and the negs have relaxed to a nearly flat condition. This is definitely not the film to be using in Phoenix, Arizona!

Steve

12-20-2009, 05:31 PM   #17
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Get an 8x10" hotpack. Put it in the microwave until pleasantly, nicely warm (as warm as you'd use for tired muscles.)

Put sleeved film on flat surface. Put hotpack ontop of it.

Leave for half an hour or so, probably longer for that stuff by the look of it.

Take off hotpack. Et voila, perfectly flat film.

It's the only thing I've found that works, consistently, with any film. Doesn't damage it.

Every other bloody method people use is either voodoo or only applicable if you develop your film in the right part of Gloucestshire, UK, and only if you shoot the right type of film.
12-20-2009, 07:32 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by lithos Quote
Get an 8x10" hotpack. Put it in the microwave until pleasantly, nicely warm (as warm as you'd use for tired muscles.)

Put sleeved film on flat surface. Put hotpack ontop of it.

Leave for half an hour or so, probably longer for that stuff by the look of it.

Take off hotpack. Et voila, perfectly flat film.

It's the only thing I've found that works, consistently, with any film. Doesn't damage it.

Every other bloody method people use is either voodoo or only applicable if you develop your film in the right part of Gloucestshire, UK, and only if you shoot the right type of film.
I tried that! It worked for about 15 minutes and then the film sprung back up! I then parked the sheet under a stack of heavy books for several days. Same result. I am going to send a copy of this photo to Freestyle and to Mahn/Maco and get their take on it. Clearly there is a manufacturing issue or the film they sold is not as spec'd in their data sheet.

Steve
12-20-2009, 07:32 PM   #19
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Steve. I really enjoyed reading your OP and I must say that those images look great to me. So sharp and so much detail. The tones seem spot on to me. I have considered that film myself.
Thanks for sharing and again saving US work as you did with the Ektar 100

12-20-2009, 07:34 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote
Wow, thanks Steve! Where did you get that book with the grayscale? ...
It just occurred to me that there might also be a printable JPEG of a gray scale available somewhere online.

Steve
12-22-2009, 09:45 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
It just occurred to me that there might also be a printable JPEG of a gray scale available somewhere online.

Steve
Thank you Steve. I have one of these which is nice, but the swatches are too small to effectively spot meter. Those big patches could come in handy.
12-29-2009, 01:59 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I tried that! It worked for about 15 minutes and then the film sprung back up! I then parked the sheet under a stack of heavy books for several days. Same result. I am going to send a copy of this photo to Freestyle and to Mahn/Maco and get their take on it. Clearly there is a manufacturing issue or the film they sold is not as spec'd in their data sheet.
Steve
Patience is the key. Half an hour really is the minimum.

If that still doesn't work, then, try "annealing" it. Instead of waiting for half an hour, try instead leaving it until the film and the hot pack is completely cool, which forces it to cool flat. Might take a few hours, might take overnight. Often the shock of going from warm to cool causes the film to re-buckle.

Granted, this method works best for curl caused by the emulsion...if the film base is naturally that curly, I don't think it'll work very well.

If you're impatient about the long period of cooling, after half an hour of having them under the hotpack, place them immediately in between the pages of the heaviest hardcover book you've got. They'll cool down quick, yes, but hopefully the book will force them to cool flat.

Just to say, though, this is the best bloody tip I've found to do with DIY processing. It works. It's fairly fast, and it definitely works with mainstream films, and it solves one of the biggest darkroom problems.
12-29-2009, 06:42 PM   #23
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Many films curl in a similar fashion. I wouldn't call that excessive.

Most enlarger negative carriers would flatten that out pretty well.
Stopping down and careful grain focusing would produce a uniformly sharp print.

Are scanners unable to cope with that degree of negative curl? Flatbed or film?

Chris

12-29-2009, 07:18 PM   #24
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My flatbed has a spring mounted anti-newton glass lid that sandwiches the film tight between itself and the bed. Most flatbeds don't work that way and have to use carriers that are really poor at keeping the negatives flat. The Nikons, which I believe Steve uses, also have a a really hard time keeping film flat without resorting to a glass sandwich. It really is a big problem for scanning and is one of the reasons the Imacons and drum scanners hold the film on a curve.

edit: I've never worked in a darkroom before, but I'd imagine enlargers wouldn't have as much of a problem because they project the whole image at one time, but a scanner is like a microscope and has to focus at the micron level with very little DOF.

@Steve
Have you looked into one of the glass holders available for the Nikons? May solve your problem without messing with the fuss of trying to get them to stay flat.

Last edited by Vertex Ninja; 12-29-2009 at 11:08 PM.
12-29-2009, 09:45 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Many films curl in a similar fashion. I wouldn't call that excessive.

Most enlarger negative carriers would flatten that out pretty well.
Stopping down and careful grain focusing would produce a uniformly sharp print.

Are scanners unable to cope with that degree of negative curl? Flatbed or film?

Chris
The negative carrier on my enlarger would work fine. The scanner is another matter. The strip SR-21 strip film adapter for the Nikon Super Coolscan 5000 ED is picky about film curl. More than 6mm curl across the strip or less that 30mm curl longwise and the feeder is liable to jam. There is also risk of damage to the film. The solution is to use the FH-3 film holder to scan one frame at a time. Unfortunately, the FH-3 is flimsy and difficult to use with badly curled film.

In any case, I am pleased that the RR 100 has relaxed considerably with the return of higher humidity.

Steve
12-29-2009, 09:51 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote

@Steve
Have you looked into one of the glass holders available for the Nikons? May solve your problem without messing with the fuss of trying to get them to stay flat.
I am unaware of glass carriers from Nikon for the 5000 ED, though I believe that there is an aftermarket kit that allows modification of the FH-3 for wet mount with a cover glass and mounting fluid on the base side only.

Steve
12-29-2009, 11:11 PM   #27
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Yeah, I misspoke. I looked around and couldn't find any for the 35mm Nikons just the 8/9000.
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