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01-05-2010, 01:02 PM   #16
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Thanks everyone for the replies. The use of filters was very helpful. As of now, I am just going to shoot with the film and see what I get. I have most of the filters you all recommended though, so I will experiment with those later.

02-22-2010, 08:39 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
In short: no adjustments necessary for exposure. Chromogenic films such as BW400CN and XP2 behave like color print films, and 'real' b&w film has a very wide latitude when it comes to exposure.
All of the tips on the filters were very helpful (as was the ominous photo of parliament), however I have another question about the actual film. You mentioned that the colour developed behave different from true B&W films, when I last at Black's I picked up a roll of each but I haven't been daring enough to load them in my camera. Can you expand more on what I should expect. For example should I expect the B&W to be more contrasty?

Thanks for your help
02-22-2010, 09:45 PM   #18
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Ok, I was unsure of 'fake' B&W film. Here's a scan directly from the minilab (no contrast adjust or sharpening), taken with a Pentax-M 50mm f/1.4 at about f/8... no filter... basically, it's a standard shot with a standard lens.

Oh, the film is Kodak BW400CN BTW.

02-22-2010, 10:14 PM   #19
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Here is a third option b&w slide film. This Fompan R100 is a true reversal film, processed with dr5 Chrome.



I’m going to try some Efke negative film next and have it processed in dr5 Chrome, so it ends up a reversal slide.

02-22-2010, 10:26 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Simian Summit Quote
All of the tips on the filters were very helpful (as was the ominous photo of parliament), however I have another question about the actual film. You mentioned that the colour developed behave different from true B&W films, when I last at Black's I picked up a roll of each but I haven't been daring enough to load them in my camera. Can you expand more on what I should expect. For example should I expect the B&W to be more contrasty?

Thanks for your help
I would recommend just doing some test shots (pick a subject/theme you like) with these two rolls of film and try a few filters. Mark down all the info you can for each shot, so when you get the films processed you will remember the camera settings & filters you used. It’s a perfect way to see which film & filter effects you prefer. Don’t worry about wasting pictures, practice makes perfect!

Good luck & have fun!!

Phil.

PS Welcome to the forum!
02-23-2010, 04:45 AM   #21
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All I meant to say: the 'fakes' behave more like color film when it comes to latitude, under expose and you get a lot of grain. The grain looks a bit different than 'real' b&w film grain.


Excellent fire truck by the way, it has a medium format look to it. And a good example of what BW400CN can do.

Last edited by Nesster; 02-23-2010 at 04:52 AM.
02-23-2010, 06:21 AM   #22
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As a rather blunt, if accurate way, of answering the original question:

ISO 100 is ISO 100 is ISO 100 is ISO 100.
ISO 400 is ISO 400 is ISO 400 is ISO 400.
ISO 800 is ISO 800 is ISO 800 - you get the idea.

That "ISO" stands for International Standards Organisation, so it means Kodak Ektachrome E100G has the same sensitivity as Ilford Delta 100 which has the same sensitivity as Fuji Superia Reala, technically speaking.

So, no, no changes or adjustments to your camera are necessary. Just remember to change the film rating on the ISO dial on the camera if you're shooting one of the old-school, pre-DX encoding cameras.
02-23-2010, 09:04 AM   #23
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Don't use color filters blindly. You don't always need them. And sometimes they can hurt your shadow detail. No filter in this shot. Using one would have made the challenge of getting detail in the dark areas even more difficult. Capturing detail outside the window and detail in the darkest area was exceeding the range of the film. I barely made it on the outside but lost a little in the darkest area. And you'd know this in advance by using a spotmeter.


Kodak 320TXP, Pentax Spotmeter V



Last edited by tuco; 02-23-2010 at 09:23 AM.
02-24-2010, 04:41 AM   #24
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Wait until you use InfraRed film !!!

QuoteOriginally posted by lithos Quote
How Photography Has Changed Me #182: I will walk through a lush tropical rainforest and think, "Man, this place is yellow..."
02-25-2010, 03:38 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
All I meant to say: the 'fakes' behave more like color film when it comes to latitude, under expose and you get a lot of grain. The grain looks a bit different than 'real' b&w film grain.


Excellent fire truck by the way, it has a medium format look to it. And a good example of what BW400CN can do.
My experience has been that the chromogenic films have the same or better lattitude than the traditional BW films, and they do so without changing the processing. Like traditional BW, grain and contrast are increased with underexposure (though grain comes more in underexposed traditional film when pushed), but, as you said, the grain is different. For years, XP1 was my film of choice for cameras with a broken or no light meter.

Last edited by GeneV; 02-25-2010 at 06:23 AM.
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