Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
05-25-2010, 05:49 PM   #46
Inactive Account




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 207
QuoteOriginally posted by ragamuffin1171 Quote
Okay. I'm still waiting on light seal kit, but in the meanwhile, I was playing with my spotmatic f and trying to focus manually. Even with full aperture, I had hard time focusing (especially indoor) and sure miss my AF function on my dslr (or more advanced film camera). Would I just need a lot more practice or is there something that will help me, like a magnifying eyecup or different types of focus screens or some other trick? I'm specially having a hard time focusing a distant object.
When fiddling with the focusing of your SP-F, remember that what you see is at full aperture (open aperture focusing).

Having set the focus to the best of your ability, check "the camera's view" of your scene by using the stop-down lever. You will be surprised how much sharper it looks at the "taking" aperture.

For scenics and candids, when shooting outside in reasonable light (using "normal" or "wide angle" lenses), set a smallish aperture (f/8 or smaller) and use it in conjunction with "hyperfocal focusing". You will find everything from a few feet away to infinity will be "in focus". This virtually eliminates the need for fussy focusing. The "wider" the lens (the shorter the focal length), the greater the depth of field. With a 28mm lens (or shorter) and a smallish aperture, it virtually behaves like a fixed-focus lens.


Last edited by Banjo; 05-25-2010 at 05:59 PM.
05-26-2010, 08:27 PM   #47
Senior Member
Painter's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 275
What else am I going to put in my cameras

Perhaps it is nostalgia but I really like the design and engineering of old cameras and film gives me an excuse to use them. People react very differently to an old rangefinder vs having a DSLR pointed at them and it can be a conversation starter. As others have said film still has it's place but it certainly is a much smaller one that is shrinking. So for me I shoot film because of the cameras and not for what film provides.
05-27-2010, 06:30 PM   #48
Senior Member




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 268
QuoteOriginally posted by Painter Quote
Perhaps it is nostalgia but I really like the design and engineering of old cameras and film gives me an excuse to use them. People react very differently to an old rangefinder vs having a DSLR pointed at them and it can be a conversation starter. As others have said film still has it's place but it certainly is a much smaller one that is shrinking. So for me I shoot film because of the cameras and not for what film provides.
I 100% agree - I was at a local market the other day using an old Yashica, and I got quite a few questions asking about what sort of camera I was using, which led to some interesting conversations.

If I want convenience, then I will use a DSLR, if I want to take photos for the sake of taking photos, then I like to use film.
Although a longer process and far less convenient, there is something about using film that makes me feel more part of the process, and not just an observer snapping away.
05-28-2010, 08:34 PM   #49
Veteran Member
Jools's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: SW Wisconsin by way of Venezuela
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,383
QuoteOriginally posted by Painter Quote
Perhaps it is nostalgia but I really like the design and engineering of old cameras and film gives me an excuse to use them. People react very differently to an old rangefinder vs having a DSLR pointed at them and it can be a conversation starter. As others have said film still has it's place but it certainly is a much smaller one that is shrinking. So for me I shoot film because of the cameras and not for what film provides.
QuoteOriginally posted by MattC Quote
I 100% agree - I was at a local market the other day using an old Yashica, and I got quite a few questions asking about what sort of camera I was using, which led to some interesting conversations.

If I want convenience, then I will use a DSLR, if I want to take photos for the sake of taking photos, then I like to use film.
Although a longer process and far less convenient, there is something about using film that makes me feel more part of the process, and not just an observer snapping away.
I read both your responses and it echoed with me.
Film photography seems to have reached some nostalgia/exotic status these days.

Perhaps it's because in our current age things have to happen super fast... an instant response on a monitor or memory card.

And while I value the speed and the instant result dslrs can offer, in the end the understanding of the given situation being photographed should never be underestimated. That is why film photography is still essential. The mental process of analyzing a certain situation is extremely important. And there is something to say about the older days of waiting for the development and printing of one's captures. It all has gotten lost. It's like we have no patience any more.

Everytime, I get this worked up I look at the past photographers. Geez they did awesome stuff with what most today would consider as basic. And the funny thing is that it can still be done today by the adventurous.

06-04-2010, 07:51 AM   #50
Inactive Account




Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: TN
Posts: 24
Original Poster
LBA & CBA...need to stop

Okay. Since I joined this wonderful forum back in April (a little less than 2 months ago), I've compiled 4 screw mount cameras (sp-f, mamiya/sekor 1000dtl, fujica st701, vivitar 220/sl), and 12 m42 lenses (s-tak 55/2, s-tak 135/3.5, vivitar series 1 70-210 v.1, panagor 28/2.5, vivitar 35/2.8, mamiya 50/1.4, mamiya 55/1.8, fujinon 55/1.8, sigma 28/2.8(I broke it), yashinon dx 200/4, and a couple of lesser known vivitar zoom lenses), flashes, filters, etc.
I've put in new light seals on 3 of 4 cameras and I think I'm ready to shoot and stop to this buying addiction. If my emptying wallet can't stop it, my wife's stare sure will put it to a halt.
So far, I really like the IQ of all lenses that I acquired. Thank you all for the wonderful reviews on lenses.
People constantly ask me why I'm shooting with film camera, and I just tell them that I now think before I shoot.
06-05-2010, 01:29 PM   #51
Veteran Member
octavmandru's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: somewhere around
Posts: 615
There's a good reason:
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-dslr-discussion/103583-auto-iso-do-you-use.html

Ask people a question and they'll find a way to offend each other.
Octav
06-05-2010, 01:47 PM   #52
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 6,988
I don't know how may can relate to this but in college taking math and engineering courses the books in the first few years had the answers in the back to most the problems. You'd work the problem and no sooner than being done flip to to the back to see if you got the answer right.

Well, then came the junior and senior years. The books didn't hardly have any answers in the back. At first it was frustrating not knowing and I was saying this is BS! But after being forced to develop other skills, you didn't need to see the answer. You knew if you got it right almost all the time. Similarly with film shots. I know before I develop the film which shots are going to be decent. Now and then one will surprise me as being better or worse than I thought it would be. And with my Pentax 67 only having 10 frames and Hasselblad having 12 frames per 120 roll, I find it difficult to even shoot up the roll in a single outing these days because I have become so selective.

Yeah, I'm sure I've missed a few opportunities by thinking too much but, hey, this is only a hobby and fortunately I don't have to feed the kids from photography; otherwise, they'd starve

Last edited by tuco; 06-05-2010 at 02:23 PM.
06-06-2010, 02:39 AM   #53
Site Supporter
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,607
The latent image makes you a better photographer.

Chris

06-20-2010, 11:43 PM   #54
Loyal Site Supporter
Pioneer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Elko, Nevada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,203
It is Addictive!!

Is there any good reason to shoot film over digital? Not really. In most situations digital will provide you with results that are just as good, and a lot faster. But there are lots of situations where speed and convenience may be your enemy, not your friend. I use digital cameras and I enjoy them. But shooting film can be addictive and most of the time I prefer it.

Just like others who have already posted, I have lots of reasons for enjoying film.
A - Handling and using those old manual cameras.
B - Batteries are optional, and they last for years (unless I forget to replace the lens cap) since they are only powering the light meter.
C - I think a lot more about exactly what I'm trying to capture with each picture when I'm using film.
D - When I get a great shot with my manual cameras it is all mine. Likewise, when I get a bad shot, it is also all mine.
E - I learn a lot more from my bad pictures because most of the time I look them over carefully trying to figure out what I did wrong.
F - I have yet to lose a single negative when my computer hard drive crashes, and I've lost a few hard drives and pictures over the years.

But the real reason that I prefer using film over digital is that I am lazy.

I often feel that digital has been a big step backwards. I don't develop my own film, I send it off so someone else can develop it. I have a lot of respect for you guys who do develop your own film, but that isn't my thing. It is really, really nice to finish a day of shooting, stuff my rolls of film in an envelope, put it in the mail, and then forget about it until it gets back. I can spend an entire week shooting film and never have to look at my computer once. While someone else is doing the work to develop my pictures I can spend time with my wife, watch a little TV, do just about anything I want. It may take me 15 or 20 minutes to put the rolls of film in an envelope for mailing and after that I'm free. With digital it can take me 15 or 20 minutes just to start the computer and get ready to start downloading my pictures. For every hour I spend taking pictures with my digital camera I probably spend at least two more hours at my computer. And there is usually so many pictures to go through that I find myself just scrolling through them. I am definitely not as selective or contemplative when I'm using my digital SLR. And I'm usually scrolling through the pictures on the screen too fast to learn anything. When I get a good picture I feel great, but I'm hardly ever learning anything from my bad ones. I try sometimes but, instead of carefully looking them over trying to figure out what I should have done, I'm usually just hitting the delete key. Or worse, I'm spending time in Photoshop trying to fix them. A bad picture manipulated in Photoshop is still almost always just a bad picture when I'm finished.

I am not really a Luddite. I do enjoy my digital cameras and I use them a lot. And in some situations they are a huge improvement over film. It is really nice to shoot hundreds of shots at a high school football game without having to worry about changing film or paying to get them all developed. I can happily "rip" shots as fast as my buffer can offload them to my memory card. Likewise, when I'm out shooting snapshots just for the fun of it, I set my digital camera to record lower quality jpegs and just go have fun. My only worry is how much juice the battery has or how much space is left on the memory card. And finally, if I am traveling by air, I refuse to try hauling any of my film cameras along anymore. I have decided that I have better things to do with my time then trying to explain to some of TSA's finest what film is and why it isn't a good idea to put it through the x-ray machine.

Face it, there is just something wonderful about popping open that beautifully engineered 6x9 medium format folding camera from the 30s and making a few beautiful pictures. Or carrying that hopelessly out-dated Pentax K1000 into the mountains on a week long camping trip and not worrying about how you are going to charge the batteries. But be careful, once you look through that viewfinder and carefully adjust the focus, or fire off a few frames of film with that crisp, mechanical shutter, and then flip through those 4x6 pictures when they get back from developing, you may get hooked. If you aren't careful it can be addicting. Don't say you haven't been warned.
06-21-2010, 07:55 AM   #55
Inactive Account




Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: TN
Posts: 24
Original Poster
too late

Pioneer,

I'm already addicted. I'm constantly looking for a reason to take out my camera to shoot (sometimes without film in it, just to hear that shutter click). Question is which camera, lens, and film to use...dilema
06-21-2010, 10:13 AM   #56
Senior Member
pontusadefjord's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Uppsala
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 111
QuoteOriginally posted by Pioneer Quote
A - Handling and using those old manual cameras.
I recently shot my first rolls of film (not counting the ones I took with a compact camera ~20 years ago when I was a child) for this reason only. If there was a digital MX I'd buy one right away...
06-21-2010, 11:00 AM   #57
Site Supporter
GeneV's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Albuquerque NM
Photos: Albums
Posts: 9,767
QuoteOriginally posted by octavmandru Quote
There's a good reason:
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-dslr-discussion/103583-auto-iso-do-you-use.html

Ask people a question and they'll find a way to offend each other.
Octav
Even if you don't use auto ISO, changing ISO is a whole lot easier on a DSLR.

That being said, I just came back from a trip shot mostly in Digital with a K-x (which I enjoyed), but I also brought along an old XA2. Ratio of keepers from 5 rolls of film: 40%. Ratio of keepers from thousands of digital clicks: 15%. Somehow, there just seem to be a lot of wasted shutter clicks along the digital way.
06-21-2010, 06:25 PM   #58
Veteran Member
goddo31's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,295
QuoteOriginally posted by GeneV Quote
Even if you don't use auto ISO, changing ISO is a whole lot easier on a DSLR.

That being said, I just came back from a trip shot mostly in Digital with a K-x (which I enjoyed), but I also brought along an old XA2. Ratio of keepers from 5 rolls of film: 40%. Ratio of keepers from thousands of digital clicks: 15%. Somehow, there just seem to be a lot of wasted shutter clicks along the digital way.
I'm like this too. I wish I could match the film keeper ratio on digital! I'm currently trying to slow down my digital shooting, in the hope of getting better pictures
Plus having 300 photos to sort though after a good day of shooting gives me a headache.

In regards to the film addiction, just like the lens addiction, it's way too late for me...
06-21-2010, 09:56 PM   #59
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 6,988
QuoteOriginally posted by goddo31 Quote
I'm like this too. I wish I could match the film keeper ratio on digital! I'm currently trying to slow down my digital shooting, in the hope of getting better pictures
Plus having 300 photos to sort though after a good day of shooting gives me a headache.

In regards to the film addiction, just like the lens addiction, it's way too late for me...
That's why they make applications like Aperture and Lightroom to make photo proofing easier?
06-22-2010, 02:59 PM   #60
Site Supporter
GeneV's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Albuquerque NM
Photos: Albums
Posts: 9,767
QuoteOriginally posted by goddo31 Quote
I'm like this too. I wish I could match the film keeper ratio on digital! I'm currently trying to slow down my digital shooting, in the hope of getting better pictures
Plus having 300 photos to sort though after a good day of shooting gives me a headache.

In regards to the film addiction, just like the lens addiction, it's way too late for me...
I've gone back and revised that a bit, I think I'm up to 20%. For one thing, it is very easy to keep the K-x on multiple exposure and end up with two exposures every time you press the shutter.

I just spent more than an hour cleaning the sensor. I thought of this thread.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
dslr, film, reason, slr
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
K100D; Good first DSLR? ckusnierek Pentax DSLR Discussion 36 04-11-2010 05:10 AM
Is the K-7 a good choice for my first dslr? Mike829 Pentax DSLR Discussion 20 08-03-2009 07:58 PM
Good reason NOT to use photo sites like FLICKR MRRiley General Talk 37 07-07-2009 06:00 PM
Dynamic Range - Film or DSLR ? knumbnutz Photographic Technique 3 03-24-2009 08:42 PM
Pillow fights are a GOOD reason for weather sealed cameras inferno10 Post Your Photos! 10 02-19-2009 12:39 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:57 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top