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06-24-2010, 11:25 AM   #61
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QuoteOriginally posted by ytterbium Quote
1.)Shooting film is a direct archival - with DSLR i have to write DVD's think of backup prints etc.
2.)You can get fully featured (nice 55/1.8, all functions) film gear very cheap - i use it for unsafe areas/street shooting.
3.)Fully mechanical camera, loaded with iso400 - a true ever-ready - newer runs out of batteries, bullet proof etc.
4.)For most decent film SLR's viewfinders ar better and brighter - desirable for night shooting.
And someone else is paid a small fee to do your post-processing.

The time I have spent in front of the computer screen as opposed to behind the viewfinder...

06-24-2010, 11:36 AM   #62
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with film you don't have to mess with damn white balance
06-24-2010, 11:47 AM   #63
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QuoteQuote:
1.)Shooting film is a direct archival...
Eh, not really.

You have to use archival storage media in a controlled environment. And, using a sharpie marker on your transparency/negative pages defeats the entire process.

Plus, you have to create some kind of catalog system...
06-24-2010, 11:54 AM   #64
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablom Quote
with film you don't have to mess with damn white balance

Substitute...cannot mess with damn white balance (with big tears)


Selectable white balance is one of the huge strong points of shooting RAW digital.


Steve

06-24-2010, 12:43 PM   #65
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Speaking of WB with film, I have a color enlarger. At one time I was doing color prints. Getting the WB correct was a pain of trial and error without a color analyzer. So I broke down and purchased one. It had to be calibrated. With this one you basically made a print until you said, yes, that is "correct color" and dialed the analyzer into that.

It did cut down the number of attempts to get a good color print. If you've ever done BW prints before, you know you have to get the time right or it will be too dark or too light. Now add in another variable of setting the color filters into that mix. Well, anyway, after spending days making prints to calibrating the analyzer I was doing okay for awhile. Then one day the light bulb burnt out in my enlarger. I put in a new one and, surprise, I had to recalibrate it all over again!

I don't do color prints anymore. The chemical shelf life is short and you have to do it in volume to make it half-way economical. So, yeah, you do get to mess with the WB on film prints if you roll your own and of course you use filters on the camera to correct the WB on the film under different light temperatures.
06-24-2010, 12:55 PM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Speaking of WB with film...I don't do color prints anymore...

Ditto...Give me the figital or pure digital workflow any day of the week over the pain of optical color prints.


Steve
06-25-2010, 02:58 PM   #67
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Ditto...Give me the figital or pure digital workflow any day of the week over the pain of optical color prints.


Steve
Therefore, I do end up messing with the white balance--in fact, with many films, far more than I do for pure digital.
06-25-2010, 07:30 PM   #68
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Gotta agree with the last 4 or so posts. Even if you're scanning, color balance is a b@&*h. However, when I scan B&W the colors always seem to come out perfect!

06-26-2010, 01:29 PM   #69
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablom Quote
with film you don't have to mess with damn white balance
I think that with film WB is called filters...or live with it.
06-26-2010, 04:45 PM   #70
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There isn't one set of compelling reasons to use a film camera over a digital camera. I'll reiterate what I tell all of my friends: you pick the best tool for the job. If I am in the city where I can drive around, and I need fast turnaround, and I have ready access to electricity, digital is where it's at. If I want something small, light, and mechanically reliable, I use film.

Personally I have three main (small format) camera outfits: Canon film SLR for action/sports where I need fast-fast-fast AF and can afford to wait to process film, Canon dSLR for convenience (dSLR AF is much slower than the AF in my EOS-3), and my Pentax gear for travel/general walkaround gear. A day's worth of Pentax gear (LX body, 3 prime lenses) weighs LESS than my Canon EOS-3 with a single zoom lens. Weight is a big factor!!
06-26-2010, 05:51 PM   #71
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QuoteOriginally posted by tendim Quote
There isn't one set of compelling reasons to use a film camera over a digital camera...
Yes... there are many! However, there are probably just as many reasons to use digital over film too.

For me,

Serious reasons:
Potentially more exposure latitude and dynamic range.
Ability to make large prints from a single shot that continue to provide real detail on very close inspection (Med format digital can do this too, but at a price).
Nice viewfinders.
Great prices on larger format gear.
Potentially smaller and lighter gear.
Personal, but reasons that probably sound silly to everyone else:
Tangible things. Opening the foil wrapper on a new roll, the slight smell, the sound of the film winding or winding myself, manual controls; aperture ring, cocking the shutter on a large format lens, etc., seeing chromes on a light table, the smell of wood and bellows on a large format camera... All those little things that add up to make it an experience and not just a means to an end.
The ability to physically develop the film at home.(not the same as developing a RAW file.) Cont...
Pulling a freshly developed roll from the tank.
Prolonged anticipation.
Potentially very slow process.(sometimes a '+', sometimes a '-')
A ton of variations by just switching film, developing differently, or both.


#1 reason for me... I just like it!
06-26-2010, 08:10 PM   #72
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QuoteOriginally posted by Simian Summit Quote
I think that with film WB is called filters...or live with it.
Actually, as others have pointed out, you still may end up dealing with during the scan or in the wet darkroom.
06-27-2010, 08:30 AM   #73
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Welcome. Glad you weren't deterred by those posting here who prefer digital.

Chris
06-28-2010, 12:54 AM   #74
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I've spent the last couple of weekends shooting film only and I must admit to having enjoyed it as a process more than with my digital. Something about the old cameras and only having a finite number of shots.

A big thing for me is that I'm more comfortable in the city with the film cameras, people seem not to mind them as much as a big dslr getting pointed at them! Was in York and felt quite nice with my nice old Pentaxi surrounded by flash Canon's and Nikons's and the rather amusing look I got from a Canon Dslr owner when he saw my film camera! DOn't think he understood.......

Film does have operating costs involved, but then I've just had to put the K200 in for a senser clean........
06-28-2010, 01:09 AM   #75
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I have a film camera I use in daylight or with flash indoors.

Advantages: FOV for landscape shots, DOF control, feeling of film

Disadvantages: time to see results, cost of prints and scan, imposibility to tweak WB (and no intent to mess with filters)
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