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K 400/5.6 on ebay - No bids yet @ $150
Posted By: jhaji, 08-25-2015, 01:30 PM

K 400/5.6 (Ex) on ebay

Would've much rather had this than the 3rd party ones that I picked up.
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09-03-2015, 06:46 PM   #31
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It's only a bad market if you're a seller.

09-04-2015, 02:52 AM   #32
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I have mixed views on the pricing of legacy lenses.

Good quality stuff is either very hard to get or is selling at high prices. Take for example the Takumar 35/2.3 or Pentax 30/2.8 lenses ..... $350 easy.

Takumar 50/1.4 eight element lenses also sell well at good prices.

Less glamorous stuff is either not selling or is doing so cheaply.

End of day, supply demand will dictate. Artificial factors such as 'saving' in advance for the Pentax FF might also be having an effect (i.e. selling lenses / not buying lenses). This dynamic might push prices down. Ultimately, I think we will see a bounce in legacy lens prices once FF is out and people have bought the camera.

Cheers
09-04-2015, 04:03 AM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wild Mark Quote
I have mixed views on the pricing of legacy lenses.

Good quality stuff is either very hard to get or is selling at high prices. Take for example the Takumar 35/2.3 or Pentax 30/2.8 lenses ..... $350 easy.

Takumar 50/1.4 eight element lenses also sell well at good prices.

Less glamorous stuff is either not selling or is doing so cheaply.

End of day, supply demand will dictate. Artificial factors such as 'saving' in advance for the Pentax FF might also be having an effect (i.e. selling lenses / not buying lenses). This dynamic might push prices down. Ultimately, I think we will see a bounce in legacy lens prices once FF is out and people have bought the camera.

Cheers
I've always thought there was a mountain of FF lenses waiting for the FF to come out - and that prices would drop when they all hit the market at the same time.

If it's a $1,600 camera - in range of the average consumer - Ricoh won't sell many $2,000 lenses b/c the camera buyers will scarf up legacy lenses on eBay. If it's a $2,600 camera the average consumer will pass, pros and enthusiasts will look, and if the SYSTEM is good enough Ricoh will have another 645z event. But legacy lens prices will continue to drop.

We shall see.

Last edited by monochrome; 09-04-2015 at 07:06 AM.
09-04-2015, 06:58 AM   #34
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This K400/5.6 has been for sale at this store for a couple years now, it's at a much higher price of 650 EUR. It's also basically new, but will it ever sell?

Pentax K 400/5,6 SMC Pentax - 35mm K-Mount Lenses - Pentax

Phil.

09-05-2015, 09:08 AM   #35
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I've never understood the allure of old, manual lenses; Why buy a manual lens when modern lenses have AF, much better coatings, and in some cases improved optical design??

The build is generally nicer (all metal in most cases) but that also means added weight... at a loss as to why go for old, manual lenses?
09-05-2015, 09:41 AM - 3 Likes   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by mee Quote
I've never understood the allure of old, manual lenses; Why buy a manual lens when modern lenses have AF, much better coatings, and in some cases improved optical design??

The build is generally nicer (all metal in most cases) but that also means added weight... at a loss as to why go for old, manual lenses?
For me, anyway, photography is a hobby, not an avocation or profession.

Part of my hobby is collecting 60's and 70's Pentax cameras and lenses, specifically (I'd start with an F2 or F1n but I don't want to be tempted to buy all those lenses in a new mount). Collecting things for the sake of collecting them appeals to me - specifically 70's manual Pentax lenses.

Part of my hobby is using the items I have collected - I enjoy the actual experience of using manual cameras and lenses - and the lenses on digital cameras. I understand that's hard to grasp for some people - consider owning and driving a 1963 Fuelie 360HP Corvette Coupe contrasted with a 2015 Z06 as an analogy for manual cameras and lenses. I appreciate the actual human work that went into engineering them to last for decades, and imagine rows of Japanese company men sitting at tables in front of parts bins assembling them. I actually hold and use the output of that personal labor. Some anonymous, probably dead person actually built this beautiful instrument. That appeals to me in a quasi-spiritual sense.

Part of my hobby is producing images. I personally prefer the warm, evocative look and rendering of the older lenses' output. I think our more modern taste for absolute sharpness at pixel-depth - the flat rendering edge-to-edge - is cold and clinical.

I get the pride of ownership, experience and images I want from older lenses. That I must manually meter, focus and expose them is the price I must pay - and is itself the benefit I receive - to get what I want.

It isn't a competition, with rules and scores and website rankings.

It's just a choice.
09-05-2015, 10:07 AM   #37
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And then there's cost. $179 shipped for a really decent K-mount 400, which I'll only use for moon shots, ground mammals, butterflies and easy birds is really astonishingly inexpensive.
09-05-2015, 10:15 AM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by mee Quote
I've never understood the allure of old, manual lenses; Why buy a manual lens when modern lenses have AF, much better coatings, and in some cases improved optical design??

The build is generally nicer (all metal in most cases) but that also means added weight... at a loss as to why go for old, manual lenses?
Much of the allure is economics - my used Tak 200/3.5 cost 1/10th as much as a used Tamron 70-200/2.8 yet provides me with similar image quality - and I prefer the Tak's bokeh.

There is a practical aspect, too: if I switch camera brands, Takumars and K-mount lenses with aperture rings are usable on most any ILC camera, unlike some more modern lenses which lack aperture rings.

Also, as monochrome stated, there is pleasure to be had in owning and using something that is a beautiful instrument. There is also a pleasure in the process of making a photo that enhances the feeling of the final result.

And, finally, older lenses simply render differently (again as monochrome stated) and sometimes that is enough.

---------- Post added 09-05-15 at 01:20 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
And then there's cost. $179 shipped for a really decent K-mount 400, which I'll only use for moon shots, ground mammals, butterflies and easy birds is really astonishingly inexpensive.
I'm genuinely envious.

Here's one of my more recent "ground mammals" shot with the smc Tak 300/4:



09-05-2015, 10:47 AM   #39
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Actually it is competition of the highest form Mono. Appreciation and Acquisition of the Manual Arts is a skill that you've described eloquently.
As the always visionary Mr. Natural said………

"At home or work, Get the Right Tool for the Job."
09-05-2015, 10:47 AM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
For me, anyway, photography is a hobby, not an avocation or profession.

Part of my hobby is collecting 60's and 70's Pentax cameras and lenses, specifically (I'd start with an F2 or F1n but I don't want to be tempted to buy all those lenses in a new mount). Collecting things for the sake of collecting them appeals to me - specifically 70's manual Pentax lenses.

Part of my hobby is using the items I have collected - I enjoy the actual experience of using manual cameras and lenses - and the lenses on digital cameras. I understand that's hard to grasp for some people - consider owning and driving a 1963 Fuelie 360HP Corvette Coupe contrasted with a 2015 Z06 as an analogy for manual cameras and lenses. I appreciate the actual human work that went into engineering them to last for decades, and imagine rows of Japanese company men sitting at tables in front of parts bins assembling them. I actually hold and use the output of that personal labor. Some anonymous, probably dead person actually built this beautiful instrument. That appeals to me in a quasi-spiritual sense.

Part of my hobby is producing images. I personally prefer the warm, evocative look and rendering of the older lenses' output. I think our more modern taste for absolute sharpness at pixel-depth - the flat rendering edge-to-edge - is cold and clinical.

I get the pride of ownership, experience and images I want from older lenses. That I must manually meter, focus and expose them is the price I must pay - and is itself the benefit I receive - to get what I want.

It isn't a competition, with rules and scores and website rankings.

It's just a choice.

Oh I see. Much like some people (usually those who grew up with it) tending to stick to clunky, analog, reel-to-reel recording equipment versus the clean, high SnR, high frequency range digital equipment today. Some say there is an obvious warmth to the old, analog stuff but I think it is largely in their heads. But that is ok too.. we all have our hobbies.

Thanks for taking the time to explain!!

I come from a different mindset where I'm looking to get the cleanest, sharpest, richest (colors) images with the least noise possible from the least amount of lenses possible (for the least amount of money). I see the older lenses as largely cumbersome with many more flaws than modern designs. I guess this is a case of how you see the flaws -- asset or hindrance. And I'm not much of a collector.. different worlds. But it is interesting to see the different viewpoints and how that alters the type, style, and, in general, the photos produced.

Someone could probably author a photo book on this.. take X number of photographers (of all ages and experience level) and hand them an SLR with period lenses... let them loose. Then, later, take the same photographers and hand them each a DSLR with period lenses.. let them loose once more. Collect and compare the body of images produced. I'd be interested in seeing if there were any patterns as a result. Not necessarily in lack of proper exposure or focus, but more to WHAT was photographed and HOW it was framed and displayed in their images.
09-05-2015, 10:53 AM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
For me, anyway, photography is a hobby, not an avocation or profession.

Part of my hobby is collecting 60's and 70's Pentax cameras and lenses, specifically (I'd start with an F2 or F1n but I don't want to be tempted to buy all those lenses in a new mount). Collecting things for the sake of collecting them appeals to me - specifically 70's manual Pentax lenses.

Part of my hobby is using the items I have collected - I enjoy the actual experience of using manual cameras and lenses - and the lenses on digital cameras. I understand that's hard to grasp for some people - consider owning and driving a 1963 Fuelie 360HP Corvette Coupe contrasted with a 2015 Z06 as an analogy for manual cameras and lenses. I appreciate the actual human work that went into engineering them to last for decades, and imagine rows of Japanese company men sitting at tables in front of parts bins assembling them. I actually hold and use the output of that personal labor. Some anonymous, probably dead person actually built this beautiful instrument. That appeals to me in a quasi-spiritual sense.

Part of my hobby is producing images. I personally prefer the warm, evocative look and rendering of the older lenses' output. I think our more modern taste for absolute sharpness at pixel-depth - the flat rendering edge-to-edge - is cold and clinical.

I get the pride of ownership, experience and images I want from older lenses. That I must manually meter, focus and expose them is the price I must pay - and is itself the benefit I receive - to get what I want.

It isn't a competition, with rules and scores and website rankings.

It's just a choice.
@monochrome - So nicely put. We should pull this quote out whenever anyone wonders about the use of older lenses. Though I shoot primarily with new AF's, I do enjoy the handling and rendering of older lenses as well.
09-05-2015, 11:03 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kath Quote
@monochrome - So nicely put. We should pull this quote out whenever anyone wonders about the use of older lenses. Though I shoot primarily with new AF's, I do enjoy the handling and rendering of older lenses as well.
@Kath - TYVM. Yeah, sure, I have the FA Limiteds and the basic FA AF lenses and I use them very often when I want the convenience of AF (and the special characteristics of the Princesses) - but I really enjoy using manual focus lenses.

I just read your wonderful post on your new Wimberley head. I had commented upthread that I imagine my lucky 'savings' on this lens will be spent on a gimbal head so your post is timely and a very practical share!!
09-05-2015, 11:27 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
@Kath - TYVM. Yeah, sure, I have the FA Limiteds and the basic FA AF lenses and I use them very often when I want the convenience of AF (and the special characteristics of the Princesses) - but I really enjoy using manual focus lenses.

I just read your wonderful post on your new Wimberley head. I had commented upthread that I imagine my lucky 'savings' on this lens will be spent on a gimbal head so your post is timely and a very practical share!!
Interestingly, though I mostly use AF lenses, I often use manual focus on them if my subject is still. With the longer lenses, as you know, focus can get out of hand pretty easily sometimes, and there is something very visually satisfying about focusing in on a target by hand.

I had noted your gimbal reference. Happy to oblige!
09-05-2015, 11:46 AM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by luftfluss Quote
Much of the allure is economics - my used Tak 200/3.5 cost 1/10th as much as a used Tamron 70-200/2.8 yet provides me with similar image quality - and I prefer the Tak's bokeh.

There is a practical aspect, too: if I switch camera brands, Takumars and K-mount lenses with aperture rings are usable on most any ILC camera, unlike some more modern lenses which lack aperture rings.

Also, as monochrome stated, there is pleasure to be had in owning and using something that is a beautiful instrument. There is also a pleasure in the process of making a photo that enhances the feeling of the final result.

And, finally, older lenses simply render differently (again as monochrome stated) and sometimes that is enough.

Thank you for your response. Definitely different worlds, but it is nice to know!
09-05-2015, 01:36 PM - 1 Like   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kath Quote
Interestingly, though I mostly use AF lenses, I often use manual focus on them if my subject is still. With the longer lenses, as you know, focus can get out of hand pretty easily sometimes, and there is something very visually satisfying about focusing in on a target by hand.

I had noted your gimbal reference. Happy to oblige!
I concur. I find often when trying to single out a single item in a crowd of others, both near and far, auto focus can take longer than I do with manual focus. Then again, I'm a product of the manual focus world, so having to use it occasionally doesn't tend to bother me. Kind of like arguing the merits of auto transmissions vs. manual. They both have their places.
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