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Vello Timer $30 - good deal
Posted By: kcjonez, 09-17-2018, 04:53 AM

Today only B&H loss leader sale;

Deal Zone, Deal of the Day at B&H

I have this timer and it is easy to use and works great. Perfect for night photography, star trails etc. Camera battery gets used for shutter only and lasts much longer.

No, I don't get a kickback...lol
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09-17-2018, 10:19 AM   #2
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I use built in intervalometer ever since Pentax K-x. I was tempted to get one of these.. but the built in intervalometer servers me very well.
09-17-2018, 10:56 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by shardulm Quote
I use built in intervalometer ever since Pentax K-x. I was tempted to get one of these.. but the built in intervalometer servers me very well.
I use my intervalometers too shardulm. I use this when camera battery life is an issue.
09-18-2018, 09:38 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by kcjonez Quote
I use my intervalometers too shardulm. I use this when camera battery life is an issue.
So give me an example of the photo shoot where this device helped. As in you used this device so you could go on for 2 days vs without this it could go nly 4 hours or so (assuming you could not change the battery in between and restart the intervalometer or use AC power supply).

09-18-2018, 02:54 PM - 1 Like   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by shardulm Quote
So give me an example of the photo shoot where this device helped. As in you used this device so you could go on for 2 days vs without this it could go nly 4 hours or so (assuming you could not change the battery in between and restart the intervalometer or use AC power supply).
I'll step in here and answer this since I shoot about 4TB of timelapse footage a year.

Imagine you want to set up several remote cameras in hidden places around the city to shoot timelapses of the New Years Eve fireworks show. You set them up, set your exposure, and leave them in place - starting at noon, and wanting them to activate for the show. Try doing that with the built-in intervalometer.

With these, you put them on a delay, have your camera on, and let it fall asleep. At the proper time, the delay stops and the first exposure trigger wakes your camera back up. The rest of the interval shooting takes you through the end of the fireworks show. It stops, your camera goes back to sleep. You pick the camera up whenever. Last NYE I deployed 5 remote cameras, and used this exact method.

Another practical example? With this device, you can shoot a timelapse with the exact same interval that your camera can read out. Want to take it at 1.3 seconds? How about 1.7? You can do it with external ones. You can't do it with the internal. Want to take it for 10 exposures of 0.7 seconds, wait 10 seconds, then do 10 exposures for 0.7 seconds, repeat ad nauseum? You can do it with the external. You can't even come close with the internal.

Want another practical example? Say you're shooting timelapse with changing light throughout the duration of the exposure.

Using the built-in intervalometer, you can't change any of your exposure settings without disabling the intervalometer. So you disable it, change your exposure, and start the internal intervalometer again. You've missed at least one, maybe 2 images in your proper sequence. Also, every time you touch your camera and have to go through a button-pushing process, you're running the risk of nudging your frame. Do that over and over for the 35ish-to-45ish exposure changes of day into night, and your timelapse footage waves around... and still has missing frames.

With the external intervalometer, sure you still have to touch your camera wheel to change your exposure, but all that other touching is 100% avoided. You can also change your interval in the middle of shooting. Sometimes when I know sunset is going to be quick, I'll cut the interval in half when the clouds are orange and pink, then bring it back to normal speed when the climax is done. This extends the period of beautiful colors in your footage. You can do that all without touching your camera. Using the built-in, you've got to touch it to turn it off. Touch it a bunch to change the interval. You're missing frames now. Touch it again to resume the speedier interval. Repeat that to slow it back down.

Every time you touch your camera, you're risking changes in your framing. Played back at 24 fps, 30 fps, or 60 fps, those small changes are very noticeable. Those missing frames become very noticeable.

How about one more example. Want to catch a great frame or "decisive moment" photo somewhere in the series (though it doesn't line up with your interval shooting)? Mash the button on the remote. It takes a picture without interrupting your normal, set interval. You pull the photo out later as a still, and keep the rest of the sequence as a timelapse. You can't do that at all with the built-in intervalometer.

I've got a bunch external intervalometers, obviously. The Vello is the best of the bunch. The bower and neewer ones aren't precise in their timing like the Vello is. I almost want to buy a backup from the B&H Deal of the Day.

Last edited by disasterfilm; 09-18-2018 at 03:04 PM.
09-24-2018, 12:58 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by disasterfilm Quote
I'll step in here and answer this since I shoot about 4TB of timelapse footage a year.

Imagine you want to set up several remote cameras in hidden places around the city to shoot timelapses of the New Years Eve fireworks show. You set them up, set your exposure, and leave them in place - starting at noon, and wanting them to activate for the show. Try doing that with the built-in intervalometer.

With these, you put them on a delay, have your camera on, and let it fall asleep. At the proper time, the delay stops and the first exposure trigger wakes your camera back up. The rest of the interval shooting takes you through the end of the fireworks show. It stops, your camera goes back to sleep. You pick the camera up whenever. Last NYE I deployed 5 remote cameras, and used this exact method.

Another practical example? With this device, you can shoot a timelapse with the exact same interval that your camera can read out. Want to take it at 1.3 seconds? How about 1.7? You can do it with external ones. You can't do it with the internal. Want to take it for 10 exposures of 0.7 seconds, wait 10 seconds, then do 10 exposures for 0.7 seconds, repeat ad nauseum? You can do it with the external. You can't even come close with the internal.

Want another practical example? Say you're shooting timelapse with changing light throughout the duration of the exposure.

Using the built-in intervalometer, you can't change any of your exposure settings without disabling the intervalometer. So you disable it, change your exposure, and start the internal intervalometer again. You've missed at least one, maybe 2 images in your proper sequence. Also, every time you touch your camera and have to go through a button-pushing process, you're running the risk of nudging your frame. Do that over and over for the 35ish-to-45ish exposure changes of day into night, and your timelapse footage waves around... and still has missing frames.

With the external intervalometer, sure you still have to touch your camera wheel to change your exposure, but all that other touching is 100% avoided. You can also change your interval in the middle of shooting. Sometimes when I know sunset is going to be quick, I'll cut the interval in half when the clouds are orange and pink, then bring it back to normal speed when the climax is done. This extends the period of beautiful colors in your footage. You can do that all without touching your camera. Using the built-in, you've got to touch it to turn it off. Touch it a bunch to change the interval. You're missing frames now. Touch it again to resume the speedier interval. Repeat that to slow it back down.

Every time you touch your camera, you're risking changes in your framing. Played back at 24 fps, 30 fps, or 60 fps, those small changes are very noticeable. Those missing frames become very noticeable.

How about one more example. Want to catch a great frame or "decisive moment" photo somewhere in the series (though it doesn't line up with your interval shooting)? Mash the button on the remote. It takes a picture without interrupting your normal, set interval. You pull the photo out later as a still, and keep the rest of the sequence as a timelapse. You can't do that at all with the built-in intervalometer.

I've got a bunch external intervalometers, obviously. The Vello is the best of the bunch. The bower and neewer ones aren't precise in their timing like the Vello is. I almost want to buy a backup from the B&H Deal of the Day.


Thank you. That was convincing.
Although the auto exposure or even P mode will adjust to expose the image correctly without having to change any of the params unless you are shooting full manual. It even refocuses unless you leave it at manual focus.
I will try all the scenarios you mentioned (not that I ran into any myself but just for the sake of hashing out what can and cannot be done) to see if I really need an external intervalometer. I never felt the need for the scenarios that I use till date. And I never leave my equipment unattended unless it is inside the house shooting through the window.
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