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Forum: Photographic Technique 2 Days Ago  
Why stop motion car restoration is Youtube the hard way
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 5
Views: 290
I found this very interesting...
















You Tube




:cool:
Forum: Photographic Industry and Professionals 6 Days Ago  
Nodal Ninja moving operations...
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 3
Views: 308
I received this email today.....






QuoteQuote:

Closed in the US but NOT gone!

To our Friends, Customers, and Fan's,
It is with great sadness that today I am announcing our plans to close the Nodal Ninja operations here in the US effective Oct 28th 2019. Nodal Ninja will now be headquartered in Hong Kong under the control of Nick Fan of Fanotec International. All future orders will funnel through our authorized dealers.
I Reiterate
Nodal Ninja is NOT going out of business!
We are merely going through a transitional phase.

We owe you!
We are not like other companies when one day you wake up and find a company gone. Other panoramic hardware companies close the doors without so much as a goodbye to their customer base. We, on the other hand, feel a debt of gratitude is owed to our hard-earned and loyal customer base as well as the panoramic community. With that said I would like to expound on what brought us to this point. It is a little long-winded.

Why?
Sales in 360 panoramic hardware as been declining for some time. Many factors play into this to include:
  • 360 one-shot solutions. While it will be some time, if even possible, before these solutions will reach the output quality of DSLR's consumers are accepting the compromise in quality.

  • Chinese market. With the advent of more Chinese companies producing cheaper hardware keeping that competitive edge has become more challenging to maintain.

  • Inflation. Considering that over the last 10 years the US has experienced a 19.5% inflation rate while at the same time we have been lowering retail product prices is another challenge we faced.

  • New small business laws and taxes. Very complicated system but at the end of the year the numbers tell the tale. The result of which over the last couple of years has not favored us to the tune of about 7%.


Result.
We have reached the point in the US where we can no longer financially sustain our base of operations here in the US leaving us with 2 possible options.

Option 1:
Stop sales to all dealers and funnel orders through the US. Needless to say, this would be heartless and cold as many dealers rely heavily on the sales of our products, with many opting to only sell the Nodal Ninja brand. This would also be a great disappointment and inconvenience to international customers as well who currently bye from their local dealer.
Option 2:
Close operations in the US. This would force "all sales" to our international dealers which may actually result in a boost in their overall sales. Customers inside North America will purchase directly through B&H Photo.
The Decision.
Really a no brainer. In order to keep the Nodal Ninja brand moving forward in a positive direction, we have decided to make the sacrifice and close operations inside the US. Trust me this was not an easy decision to make, especially in light of the fact we have 2 super employees (Thuy and Jason) which are also affected.

What's next?
Many of our recent products have been produced with cross-market appeal in mind. The NN6 and M2 series both have a secondary market in that they can also be used as Gimbal Arms opening the door to Landscape and Wildlife photographers. No other product on the market doubles as a panorama head with upper and lower stops while having the ability to disengage stops and use as a free-wheeling gimbal arm. Our poles can be used for general photography such as over the cliff imagery (see Scott Highton's Home page - Virtual Yosemite) or rooftop real estate images.
And now we enter the field of robotics. Mecha is driving the company forward. Single-axis, dual-axis, slider rails with more surprises on the horizon. So please keep spreading the word about our great products.

IVRPA:

The IVRPA as been part of our history since 2007 and I personally feel a responsibility to the community to voice concerns and opinions surrounding its declining state of affairs and I understand if some may not agree. As a sponsor, we have invested in 9 and participated in 7 of the 14 or so IVRPA conferences. We have strongly supported the core values for which the organization once stood for but times have changed. Other members and sponsors have also shared concerns about how the IVRPA is handling things. I would encourage existing members and sponsors to evaluate your membership and participation against the stated benefits (Join The International Virtual Reality Professionals Association :: IVRPA).
With so many growing allegations it's quite apparent 360-degree change is needed from the "top" down.
Because we've lost passion and enthusiasm for the IVRPA we can no longer in good conscious recommend it to anyone considering joining, investing or sponsoring.

What will I do?

For me personally this is the culmination of a "15-year" journey. The conferences and events we have attended around the globe have rewarded us with memories that will last a lifetime. We have made hundreds of friends along the way. I may no longer be in the public face so much but I will stay on as a part-time advisor helping with this early transition and going beyond.
For Kim and me, the timing is right for early retirement. The next panorama you see from me might be from some tropical destination with feet in the sand and a beer in hand :-)

From the bottom of my heart, I thank everyone for everything - it's been a fun ride :-)

Cheers,

Bill
Copyright 2019 Nodal Ninja, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in on our Nodal Ninja website. Your email address will never be shared or sold outside Nodal Ninja.

Our mailing address is:
Nodal Ninja
3454 North San Marcos Pl Ste 9
Chandler, AZ 85225



Forum: General Photography 10-08-2019, 01:12 PM  
Photographer shot nine times by three teens who asked him for a photo
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 55
Views: 1,497
This is way toooo close to home. The Encanto park area is a nice part of town.
:cool:
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 10-08-2019, 01:04 PM  
Night Neon Photography with vintage lens Super Takumar 50mm f1.4
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 5
Views: 353















You Tube




:cool:
Forum: General Photography 10-08-2019, 12:52 PM  
Interior Designer with a $12Million Budget wants a free print for the wall......
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 30
Views: 941
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 10-05-2019, 03:12 PM  
Topaz "Gigapixel AI" is the best software I've bought in years
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 17
Views: 708
I've been somewhat considering their AI Denoise product for awhile, primarily for the landscape segment of astrolandscapes. With the small amount of light you are capturing in absolute darkness, you are going to get noise. It's just the fact of life. Having said that, I've found a way around the white dots of the K1 (Raw Therapee - impulse noise slider) and the rest of the noise can be substantially reduced, however it does appear that their denoise product potentially does a better job, without the artifacts after effects.
  • Has anyone else used their denoise product on K1 images captured in the pitch dark?

  • Also, does anyone know how the product handles the white dots from the K1?

I really need to spend an entire weekend moving images to my main system - cleaning up things, combining catalogues, and then ordering a new graphics card that denoise requires. I've just been so lazy. I also need to order a new monitor that will do a better job of displaying the images. Just gotta get my s**t together.

:cool:
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 10-03-2019, 03:48 PM  
Ensuring that night shots look like night
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 29
Views: 932
I shoot with a friend who has a K-70, which is his first camera (picked it up in April, 6 months ago) other than his smart phone. We shoot Milky Way landscapes, so essentially the same problem you are having for our landscape shots (without astrotracing).

I shoot with a K1 with a DA 15-30/f2.8. He is shooting with his K70 and my borrowed Sigma 18-35/f1.8. Essentially, we have found them very similar. The K1 has about 1 to 1.5 stop advantage over the crop sensor K70. However, the K70 with the Acceleration Chip picks up 1.5 stops, starting at ISO 600. What the K1 give up with a slower aperture (f2.8) lens the K70 picks up with a faster aperture (f1.8). So, what we have found shooting together over the last 6 months, is that the kits are pretty equal in terms of overall results.

The K70, with its Sony sensor is also ISO invariant. Which means that you can shoot, capture the light and then make your adjustments in post essentially loosing nothing. Actually, you can gain by shooting at lower ISOs which tends to limit the noise, while capturing better color (star color), and then boost in post. Now that does not mean that you will capture no sensor noise. Note - actually we have found that the K70 also has the same white dot problem as the K1 has.

Shooting off tripods, we crank up the ISO to whatever (51200) and shoot say a 2 to 5 second frame to check framing, levelness, etc. then lower it to ~800 for the rest of the shooting. For the landscape segments, a 1 to 2second exposure (sometimes 4 seconds) or several 2 second exposures stacked, yields some pretty nice results.

In post processing, you can then adjust your exposures to keep the sense of night, while bringing out some of the shadow detail (well in the dark of night, everything is in the "shadows"). But, the key is - with the sensor being ISO invariant, you have the latitude of adjusting the exposure in post to provide the overall sense that you are looking for.

Here is a shot at midnight (3 frames stitched). Actually this is a test shot, that I'm using to help me process a 27 frame stitch of exactly the same view. I'm trying to get the lighting right. This was shot at 15mm with the large stitch shot at 30mm which captures about 4x more light.


Here is shot - 18 frames stitched - that I want to reshoot again - trying to get the headlights to light up the canyon at night.


There is a lot of trial and error while you are shooting out in the field, but with some reasonable post processing you can get the overall look you desire. It's not like shooting during the day with a light meter, where you can meter the scene and expose for perfection. This is more hit and miss, getting a feeling for the location, and the overall darkness that you are dealing with.

:cool:
Forum: Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 10-01-2019, 11:31 AM  
Playing with Weird ULTRA WIDE ANGLE Lenses
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 3
Views: 256















You Tube





:cool:
Forum: Pentax News and Rumors 09-10-2019, 03:11 PM  
Newest Pentax Ricoh imaging catalogue
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 41
Views: 3,789
Well the point that I was inferring here was that for the K5IIs, it was a discontinued model (in 2014) that was very good, however at the price it wasn't going to be moving really any time soon (turnover).

In the case of the 645Z, the camera store has a very large rental business supporting the local state university (ASU), and they were telling me that their rental for the 645 was very good. Lots of old 645 lenses floating around, so the photography and fine arts students have a good selection to choose from.

Basically it appeared that they have a number of bodies supporting their rental business and one on display for someone to acquire.

:cool:
Forum: Pentax News and Rumors 09-10-2019, 12:49 PM  
Newest Pentax Ricoh imaging catalogue
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 41
Views: 3,789
.... ahhhh a new catalog just in time for the holidays. Pentax does not have to spend much, just supply the simple basics. Take some pages from guerilla marketing 101.

I was over at a local camera shop back in - April. I saw that they had a 645Z and an way overpriced K5IIs on the shelf. The sales person was telling me that with a bit of marketing on Pentax's part they could sell a lot more Pentax products. I then pointed out that I bought my K5IIs new for $425 (about 8 years ago), and with a price of around $1K on their shelf, was a real stretch.

:cool:
Forum: Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 09-09-2019, 10:37 PM  
Advice on some old Nikon gear I inherited
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 7
Views: 530
My first digital camera was the Pentax K100D which was the equivalent of the D70. I've had it since 2006 and it's still a very good camera which captures very nice images. From time to time I still shoot with it. I've kept it because of the CCD sensor, which tends to be a bit more saturated, with nice large pixels - it just does a really nice job. The images have a very nice "character" to them.

Over the years, I have upgraded - but I have found that the new equipment is great, fun to use and does a really nice job - but the old equipment can be just as capable, depending on what you use it for. It does have limitations for some uses like astrolandscapes, etc.

A number of years ago, right after I upgraded to the K5 (16MP), I decided one Saturday afternoon to take a run up to the Grand Canyon - just a little 5 hour drive to shoot the sunset. Tossed everything in the truck and took off. I got up there and was shooting, then all of a sudden my new k5 drained my two batteries (it turned out that the mirror motor had a short), so I went back to the truck and picked up my "old" K100D, and kept shooting. After getting home and comparing shots the next day, the K5 had nice detail, excellent image quality, colors - everything was excellent. But, the K100D also had really nice colors, saturation, nice detail - the K100 kept up really well.

I learned a valuable lesson that day - that old equipment when used right can be just as capable. There are limitations - you can't print as large, with CCD you are not going to have exceptionally high ISO values to use - but for a lot of your shooting you can still do really well.

:cool:
Forum: Welcomes and Introductions 08-26-2019, 10:28 PM  
Hi New to dslr photography
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 17
Views: 934
Welcome to the forums. It has been said that coming to a DSLR your first hundred / thousand images will be somewhat disappointing. Smartphones are designed to make photography very easy - especially in good light. Where DSLRs are going to excel, is in difficult situations. The moral of the story is to not get disappointed.

There are a number of items that may help you.
  • The first is a video tutorial on the K-s2
















You Tube



  • There is also a 5 part video tutorial on using the K-s2. Here is the first part
















You Tube





:cool:
Forum: Pentax Full Frame 08-13-2019, 01:57 PM  
K1 or Canon 5D Mark IV for a 645Z owner?
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 77
Views: 4,141
Well, I think I have a couple of answers for you....
  • In terms of mechanical/structural engineering, there are two points of view to consider. 1) the length of the plate to provide enough bite by the clamp (on the monoball) so that you do not introduce any "wiggle". 2) Probably at least as long as the a) lens foot; and/or b) the length of the clamp; 3) essentially the longest of the two. The rail would need to be able to hold the combined weight of the camera body and lens with out flexing.

  • If you are asking based on the length of the rail that Ewan Dunsmuir is using - as seen in his videos, he - I believe, is using a longer rail so as to get the front of the element over the nodal point on his tripod. In this way he is reducing / eliminating the occurrence of parallax in his images, so that when he goes to stitch, close objects that appear in both frames will stitch properly. Since he is shooting professionally, he really does not want to shoot frame that he is going to have to toss since they will not stitch well. This tends to be more of a concern with wide angle lenses with objects in the near foreground, but that does not eliminate the problem from the use of telephoto lenses, as items can also stick up into the two adjoining frames that might make stitching more difficult - but you will have more distance, and that will help reduce the problem.


:cool:
Forum: Pentax Full Frame 08-12-2019, 01:45 PM  
K1 or Canon 5D Mark IV for a 645Z owner?
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 77
Views: 4,141
I came across this youtube channel for Ewan Dunsmuir, who is a Scottish photographer living down in New Zealand, who shoots stitched landscapes with the 645Z professionally. He also prints large and very large.
:cool:
Forum: General Photography 08-12-2019, 12:52 PM  
Hacking camera firmware to plant ransomware
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 17
Views: 1,350
The bottom line value to this exploit is rather low if not zero. The real value that in this exploit is not on DSLRs or even MILC units, but on smartphones. Android uses MTP/PTP and if they utilize some of the more egregious capabilities offered in PTP (like updating the system firmware without user input). This update feature to my thinking has no real functional value, so why implement the capability - just stub it out (if not eliminate it altogether). With the amount of functionality and information folks retain on their smartphones today, that would be the real target for a substantial greater payoff.


In theory yes, but with DSLRs and MILCs, you need to infect the camera target (using the native executable of probably the arm processor) in order to store a payload (written in x86 native executable) in order to have any effect on a home network (Windows, Mac and Linux running on either Intel or AMD processors).


And that is the large question in play here. Internet of Things (IoT) devices are going to be the real threat, just because the developers take as little time to develop these items. Who needs security? The dirty secret is that a many of the best security practices are already built into the development tools (compilers, assemblers, debuggers, software analyzers/optimizers, etc.). For buffer and stack overflows, all the software engineer needs to do is to turn on (enable) the option to check for these conditions. The penalty is that the code will be slightly larger and run a tad slower, however this can be recovered in tightening up the executable code elsewhere. Just run an optimizer and you can recover the few percentages (and more) in a couple of days time during the unit test and module integration phases.


You point is well taken, and this goes back to the overall design process. Quite a few companies that design products, make use of licensed libraries - say for PTP (a make or buy decision), but that does not mean that you want to buy the entire capability. No user in their right mind would want their camera updated with new firmware while they are having lunch next to a wifi hotspot via PTP. Some of these capabilities/functionalities, just because you can perform them, does not make them a good idea for implementation or inclusion in the final product. Actually, they cost money in memory consumption, licensing, testing, documentation, etc., during the products life time. Just take it out. In fact, there are a vast array of security requirements (or controls) that go over all of these. You don't need to be a rocket scientist to think of them, just read the basic security practices, and they will pay for themselves over time.


For me it was something of an interesting read (along with the other article linked in the thread). Nothing really new, and this is what my team at work did both internally and externally for customers/clients. All the exploits/techniques were all too well known, just that they were applied to the DSLR/MILC device ecosystems. As pointed out earlier, doing a modicum of security during the product concept, initial architecture and design phases, actually saves time and money - easily paying for itself many times over - thereby producing additional profit margin.


I agree with you in terms of PTP "feature set". Just because you can do something, does not make it a good idea for implementation.

:cool:
Forum: General Photography 08-12-2019, 12:19 AM  
Hacking camera firmware to plant ransomware
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 17
Views: 1,350
Yes, we do agree on quite a few areas.


Just because there is a possibility of transferring vulnerabilities through the "data" via PTP does not guarantee successful infection of a target system. The "data" transferred via PTP would need to be handled by the target systems software in such a manner that would enable this transferred "data" to be successfully executed (and also stored in the flash of the targeted unit). Separation of instruction and data spaces has been around for quite a long time, and is enforced by every modern (in the last 30+ years) compiler/assembler. Also, the transferred "data" would need to be in the native machine executable of the target machine. Even with the wide use of the ARM processors across the various brands of camera's image processing chips, there are sufficient differences in the various versions of the ARM processors that native code running on one version of Canon's DIGIC image processor would have problems running on another version of the DIGIC image processor, let alone another camera brand.

One of the main reasons for the prevailing security problems in the PC world is the large homogeneous ecosystem (using the Intel x86 architecture of which the AMD processors also execute). The camera's image processing hardware is not nearly as homogeneous. The greater risk is using the camera units as a transport mechanism in order to infect a PC system with the PTP "data" payload being aimed at the WinTel ecosystem.

Also, I really do not see any individual or group spending a lot of time and effort in trying to utilize cameras as a means for infection or denial of service (which is what ransomware essentially does as a base concept). I really do not see the risk in terms of your camera instructing you to transfer 1/2 of a bitcoin to yourlocalhacker@payme.com to recover your pictures. Stranger things have happened, but the payoff was quite a bit larger.The larger overall problem is the IoT (Internet of Things) of which cameras are part of. Due to the size and its overall integration within the web, IoT will be a painful mess for years to come. It's the gift that will just keep giving and giving and giving.

:cool:
Forum: General Photography 08-11-2019, 07:24 PM  
Hacking camera firmware to plant ransomware
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 17
Views: 1,350
Yes, its DEF CON time of the year and there are going to be new reports of vulnerabilities across a potentially wide range of products, devices and systems. Security or more specifically Information Assurance (or some folks like to refer to this as Information Warfare) has been my business for the last 20+ years (but, I'm now retired and prefer to take interesting photographs).

No, this could not easily happen to any brand of camera.

You must actually execute on the platform in order to create an exploit. Each brand of camera has a different image processing unit - Sony has their Bionz, Canon has their own DIGIC, Fuji uses their EXR III or X Processor Pro, Nikon / Pentax / Sigma use their own priority versions of based on Fujitsu Milbeaut (Nikon the Expeed and Pentax the PRIME, with Sigma using their True - and the Fujitsu Mibeaut does include a version of the ARM processor embedded within their image processor), etc. Yes, there is some commonality across all of these (most likely the ARM architecture), but each uses a different embedded real time operating system (RTOS), each of which has differing protocols in terms of connecting executable code fragments / exploits. In order to "hack the firmware", you need to accomplish several actions....
  • introduce some software into the system

  • have this introduced software actually execute

  • and have this introduced software be stored (on the device) in order to survive power on/off reset cycles.

The reason why Canon was the target and specifically the 80D is just what @UncleVanya pointed out - the Magic Lantern software extension and the KNOWN method to link into the camera software so as to be able to execute the "unauthorized" software. Essentially this intrusion is somewhat of a low hanging fruit. Also, an intruder is going to have to expend a lot of time and effort in order to accomplish any of this.


Yup! Magic Lantern is a ready made vehicle for creating and introducing exploits into the Canon ecosystem. It's known, documented, open source, with and abundant supply of examples.



The first rule of security is to define the risk, so you can make intelligent assessments of how to defend the system. In this particular instance, a slightly different design rule applies - don't do stupid (in the first place), especially during the design of the product. All of these exploits are well known and thread bare. They are all easily fixed. The problem is that the camera designers never considered that their cameras might become 1) a target or 2) a transport vehicle to introduce an exploit into another system.

Cameras are power cycled a lot. In order to have a successful vulnerability, the exploit needs to survive a power cycle, which means that it needs to be introduced into flash memory in such a way that upon power up / restart, that it can find a way to be executed (become active). Transiting across / through USB or WiFi does not necessarily mean or entail successful execution on the targeted device.

Yes, the camera manufacturers need to tighten up their designs and do a better job at securing their products, from these types of exploits. On the positive side, you can't exploit a camera that is not powered on - unlike most desktops and laptops (and yes, when my laptop travels, it travels in a RFID sleeve).

:cool:
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 08-07-2019, 11:29 AM  
Tale of two lenses - DFA 15-30 and Contax 85 Sonnar
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 13
Views: 978
Yea, I usually pack more than I need, and the 15-30 usually is mounted for the night shooting. During the day, I've been sometimes too lazy to sway, or slow to sway - this time I actually fixed my crappy initial selection - and was much better off. The magic answer is - I don't have a clue. I need to pack a few and make some better selections along the way.

:cool:
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 08-05-2019, 04:53 PM  
Tale of two lenses - DFA 15-30 and Contax 85 Sonnar
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 13
Views: 978
As we parked and I pulled out the camera, I had the 15-30 on because we had originally gone up there to try to shoot the Milky Way, and I wanted to get some shots of the areas that we were considering. At this location, it was just the wrong lens. The 85 was a much better selection.


There was no foreground interest at this point. Everything was in the difference and you needed the focal length to shoot over the near stuff and get the far view.


That I made a stupid lens selection for the shot, and that I had forgotten just how good the old Contex was.....


Yes, the same location with the lighting and the AoV difference in the lenses. Cropping the wide angle and just happening to stitch the 85 provided pretty much the same view.


.... and I had not shot with it for quite a while and I was really happy with the results, as the post below captures it very well.


Yup!


I might just spend a bit more time with these and see what the results produce.

:cool:
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 08-03-2019, 08:37 PM  
Tale of two lenses - DFA 15-30 and Contax 85 Sonnar
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 13
Views: 978
Thanks! I now need to come back and spend a bit more time on processing that one. I took the single frame, then flipped the camera and then quickly took the 1 row pano, so perhaps 10 seconds between the single frame and the start of the pano, and maybe a minute to the end of the pano. The clouds were really moving.

There were a couple of guys there at the point taking long exposures trying for lightning, and about 5 to 6 other folks with DSLRs shooting just the landscape.

We were out scouting locations to try to shoot the Milky Way, if the clouds broke - which actually occurred.

:cool:
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 08-03-2019, 05:53 PM  
Tale of two lenses - DFA 15-30 and Contax 85 Sonnar
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 13
Views: 978
I was up in Sedona on Thursday doing some shooting with a friend. I just happened to shoot the same view with the DFA 15-30 (cropped) and an old Contax Zeiss 85/f2.8 Sonnar lens (pano) that I had converted mounts (C/Y to K with the Leitax.com remount kit). I didn't intend to make a comparison. Fair comparison - well not really, but the 30mm cropped shot and the pano, were somewhat similar - and the shadows were just really difficult. I just had not shot with the Contax in a couple of years and just wanted to try it again since I brought it along.

This just happened to be a pull out on the road that folks had make into somewhat of a view site over the years - of Cathedral Rock. The weather was blowing through, some rain along with some lightning. The overall lighting was drastically changing by the minute.

I was doing some quick editing and with the 15-30 at 30 I cropped the top and bottom off. Looking at the images from the Contax, I had a single shot, followed by a pano of 9 frames wide. I was just looking at the output from the two lenses - and for a 35 year old lens, the Contax has not lost anything at all. I have to use my two Contax lenses more often. I should probably re-edit these, but I have some unexpected Milky Way shots to work on first....
  • First - 15-30 @ 30mm

  • Second - 85mm single frame

  • Third - 85mm 9 frame pano


:cool:
Forum: Pentax Full Frame 07-31-2019, 02:02 PM  
K1 or Canon 5D Mark IV for a 645Z owner?
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 77
Views: 4,141
There are not really a large sampling of Pentax examples available on the web. I thought these were appropriate in terms of focusing and tracking. If you can catch an owl in flight, you should pretty much be able to catch just about anything moving, regardless the target, environment and setting. Yes, there is a difference in FPS, but again if you are judicious in shooting, you should be good.

The K70 and KP are reasonably close to the K1 in terms of dynamic range (especially with the Accelerator chip). The K70 and KP would provider higher FPS too.The APS-c will certainly get you closer, plus the 1.4x TC will work very well with both the bodies and the lenses.
_____

The 645z, K1 and K5 all have pretty much the similar pixel pitch. The K70 and KP each have a finer pixel pitch, and thus will provide a slightly better resolution across the sensor.

:cool:
Forum: Pentax Full Frame 07-31-2019, 12:28 PM  
K1 or Canon 5D Mark IV for a 645Z owner?
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 77
Views: 4,141
Here is somewhat of a comparison...
















You Tube



















You Tube


















You Tube




:cool:
Forum: Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 07-29-2019, 12:47 AM  
Canon rush to reassure investors as camera profits plunge 64%
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 68
Views: 2,586
Forum: Photographic Technique 07-13-2019, 07:16 PM  
Landscape Pixel Shift Comparison
Posted By interested_observer
Replies: 11
Views: 1,264
That's a real possibility. I didn't bring a full weather station with me, just some Kentucky windage.

:cool:
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