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Forum: Pentax Medium Format 1 Day Ago  
Pentax 67 focusing screen
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 3
Views: 251
Dunno. I've only ever wrangled the Pentax 67 and I'm loathe to interfere with anything given its critical importance in my production flow.

Perhaps fellow P6x7 / 67 member Desertscape can come out of hiding and chime in here? :p
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 3 Days Ago  
Can you help me identify these marks on my lens filter?
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 11
Views: 569
Fungal growth (?)
Forum: Welcomes and Introductions 4 Days Ago  
Hello from rural australia
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 14
Views: 272
A cheerful G'day, mate! from the dusty dirty burbs and heading for the bush asunder...

And the bush hath friends to meet him, and their kindly voices greet him
In the murmur of the breezes and the river on its bars,
And he sees the vision splendid, of the sunlit plains extended,
And at night the wondrous glory of the everlasting stars

[ IV, Clancy of The Overflow]

I think Mosquito Creek is near Lake Eppalock (?)
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 5 Days Ago  
Pentax 67 Wind lever and shutter shutter button
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 4
Views: 235
Ah, so! With film loaded, the wind-on accomplished and frame #1 reached, attention can be shifted to the shutter. I assume, too, that the shutter button is unlocked (no offence intended to you but many first-time people overlook this in waves of panic).

Next, see if you can activate the mirror lock-up button, right side of the camera mirror box (viewed from holding the camera position). This swings the mirror up with a quaint "CLOP" sound (to reduce inertia-induced blur by separating mirror slap and shutter travel). Press the shutter button (Bulb or a fast shutter speed, your choice).

If nothing happens, yes, move on to the "toothpick method", better known as the reset procedure! Press the recessed button, press the shutter button and wind-on. That is the reset. I would be concerned if, after this procedure, the shutter button still does not budge.

Note that with the mirror lock-up activated, it is using power from the battery; effectively, it is "waiting" for you to press the shutter. After that, the mirror should return to its normal position and wind-on can be accomplished.

See how you go with this.
Forum: General Photography 5 Days Ago  
Novice Light Meter Musings Cont'd (when using Live view )
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 6
Views: 287
No problem!
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 5 Days Ago  
Pentax 67 Wind lever and shutter shutter button
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 4
Views: 235
G'day from Australia, Laura,
A reset of the 67 would be my first suggestion.

Where is the lens?? Put a lens on, and then load a roll of film in the camera (get an el cheapo roll, just for testing), sorry, but this part will ensure the winding mechanism is actually engaging and running the film on. Dry firing may be entertaining to see what the beast does "under the hood", but it doesn't necessarily prove the system is working correctly. So load up the film (START on leader of film to green arrow under 120 on the film rail), wind and wind and wind until the camera (should!) stop and cock the shutter when frame #1 is reached. NO force should be exerted on the winding lever when frame #1 has been reached, and the lever should spring back to its resting (closed) position

Next bit. With the camera set to B and the aperture on the lens set to anything at all, fire the camera once. If the mirror stops half-way, reset as follows: get a toothpick and insert it into the recessed access on the left of the camera (viewed from the front). Press in once, press the shutter again and wind the film on, observing the frame counter lines up to 1. Effectively, this resets the shutter mechanism, the usual method when there is a weak or dead battery.

The nearest repair to you otherwise is way out far east (USA) where Eric Henderson is based and runs the pentaxs.com repair facility. Contact with him should be made if the instructions here do not make any difference to the camera.

Your camera shows a rare treat: a removable back. An alternative back with about 250 exposures (I think?) was at some time available for heavy duty applications. I don't see many Pentax 6x7 / 67 camera with removable backs.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 5 Days Ago  
Use Peak Design anchors on 645n strap lugs?
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 9
Views: 362
I do not use Chinese-made products on any of my cameras, and certainly not the well-documented failures that have been reported with the Peak Design QR anchors abrading and failing without warning. The heavier the camera, the more secure your strap should be, and this excludes the assumed 'convenience' of QR attachment points.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 5 Days Ago  
Old 6x7 Brochure
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 8
Views: 414
I think we're going back further in the time machine than my initial thoughts. If that is a Honeywell Strobonar flash, we are staring down the tunnel of antiquity. How is it attached to the camera body? I cannot discern this point from the photo.
Forum: General Photography 5 Days Ago  
Novice Light Meter Musings Cont'd (when using Live view )
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 6
Views: 287
The histogram on the camera has no relationship to the way the Sekonic observes the scene (especially a 1 degree spot!), or the way you have 'swept' the scene with it, where experience very much determines the outcome.

Traditionally with a spot meter, one meters a bright area, but not the brightest, then a neutral area (but neither black nor white; often termed the 'middle' grey or infamously displaced "18 grey", for all Sekonics are not even calibrated to 18% grey!) then lastly, a dark area, but again, not the darkest part of the scene. The meter is then made to average these measurements (the next trick is just how it averages!), with shifts input to account for changes in light (which your camera's meter will track, but not the Sekonic!) and any basal exposure shift (plus or minus), usually based on a lot of experience. A filter factor must also be entered into the Sekonic e.g. when using a polariser, the reading must be adjusted somewhere around +1.5 to +2.0 -- again, a shift that is reached through experience.

That said and done, your camera's matrix/evaluative meter will do a stirling job, which makes the Sekonic redundant unless you are getting down and dirty with profiling -- a deep-diving diversion which I view as quite silly in the broader scheme of things. Matrix/evalutive/multipattern meters do not see the scene in the same vein as a narrow-angle spot meter with is used to discern extremely small areas of difference in luminance and tone, while the camera meter operates on a much larger and complex scale, and is faster to boot. I agree it is an interesting experiment to use a spot meter parallel to a camera's own meter(s), but conclusions should not be drawn without intensive trial and error experience.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-20-2020, 06:31 PM  
Pentax 67 focusing screen
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 3
Views: 251
Beattie IntenseScreens are known to induce exposure errors of around 1.5 to 2.0 stops (+/-), variable because of their additional brightness; this is my experience with one that was installed in my EOS 1N in the mid-90s when they were quite the novelty and everybody wanted one! The errors were generally not predictable, and when they did occur, were unforgivable, so it was removed (I probably threw it out...). Beattie screen exposure errors may in some cases be worked-around when using SLRs with matrix/evaluative metering, but the Pentax 67 is rudimentary (albeit capable) in its metering (+2.5 / -2.5 from zero), and exposure compensation must be established through careful trial and error (EC is facilitated much easier using a separate hand-held meter). I do not know anybody who is actively using these screens now.

If the screen is thicker than the standard Pentax 67 screen (with the 3 parts assembled), you will encounter problems mounting the prism and light fall-off (vignetting), or the screws will run out, notwithstanding focus errors. The fresnel size faces down. Additionally after installation, the screen is likely to require collimation: checking for precise focus at 3 points around the central area for near and infinity. Some cameras have three screws to affect this adjustment, others have shims.


My opinion is that on balance of known and potential problems (such as metering errors), it's probably the best action to stay with the standard focusing screen.
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 01-19-2020, 06:48 PM  
Trying to bring one back from the dead....help needed
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 11
Views: 610
I am shocked you would use acetone. It is destructive. But more importantly, what you have discovered is that the fungal growth has etched into the glass, which is pretty much terminal.

Hydrogen peroxide drench and short bouts of focused heat is one of the methods I have observed (in a commercial repair setting) to treat fungal infection. But etching is effectively ruination; being a physical fault, means going through a whole process of removal of the element(s), treating the fungus, and removing the etching through surface refinishing, re-polishing and refinishing (which includes re-coating). On an old lens, this is hardly worth the expense or the hazard of introducing an active fungal infection to nearby equipment.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-17-2020, 06:09 PM  
Old 6x7 Brochure
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 8
Views: 414
Mmm. It's a gentle, nostagic tug at the forelocks of a bygone era, and a nice one!
MLU didn't come along until 1975 or 1976 I think, so the brochure is probably from the late 1960s.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-15-2020, 02:41 PM  
Strange Behaviour of 6x7 Batt Check
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 4
Views: 176
Good Lord.
Lithium batteries also do not 'report' the correct amount of life remaining in them by most modern cameras, which is why your Pentax battery check light, rudimentary as it is, behaved oddly; this because they have such a steep 'death curve': the point where power drops off, then vanishes abrubtly to nothing. If this happens in a camera that is for example rewinding film into the cassette, it could well stop somewhere along the line and jam. This has happened (years ago!) with my EOS1N running off 8 x AA lithium. The drive rewind slowed, made a disturbing noise then stopped, comatose. The film was jammed and no replacement battery or swearing fixed it. The camera had to be opened in the dark and the film physically cut out!
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-15-2020, 01:47 PM  
Strange Behaviour of 6x7 Batt Check
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 4
Views: 176
Neither the Pentax 6x7, nor later 67 were designed to use lithium batteries, only silver oxide or alkaline. Actually, the two cameras pre-date the development of lithium batteries by decades. I'd be concerned that a spike in voltage could potentially be harmful to what is rudimentary electronics 'under the skin' of the camera.
Forum: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 01-11-2020, 03:51 PM  
Sekonic L478D have I got it right?
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 12
Views: 427
Reviews and Youtube vids are no substitute for hands-on experience.
Any of the Sekonic multispot/duplex meters are neither toys nor fashion accessories for today's digital cameras, expensive as they are, this profiling bit is only used in applications requiring precise colour rendition e.g. medical and scientific, and requires much more knowledge than simply plugging in the meter to a PC. All of the professional-line Sekonics (e.g. L758D) have a stable, consistent baseline (factory) calibration, but with user options such as baseline shift and additional exposure shifts for such things as filter factors, additive/subtractive metering, centre-weighted or mean-average weighted and the most critical of all, exposure steps (0.3, 0.5 and 1.0) and method of averaging. These things are far more important than profiling, as they govern how the meter responds to the scene and illumination.

At a bare minimum, your skillset should comprise of a working knowledge of the Zone System (for traditional imaging and understanding placement of values, both of which have application in digital imaging) and digital colourimetrics for production (the matching of colour profiles from camera to PC to printer, your own or across a network). My L758D is bereft of external calibration -- not even a grey card [I use the palm of my hand] or a Macbeth CC [I use a psychedelic, tie-dyed sarong!]), yet neither I nor my clients would want anything more from the photographs.

Sekonic has made a hue and cry about the supposed essential usefulness of using a multispot meter (e.g. the L758D/DR among) for profiling a digital camera, but in active practice, it is not that simple, and today's camera's do not need it, nor will photographers actually benefit without the investment mentioned in skills, above. Thus, without significant investment in baseline working skills with a multispot meter, it is likely to be discarded somewhere along the way, even though in the right hands a meter can expose far better than the camera can, particularly analogue (film, any type, be it negative or transparency).

Digital camera metering systems have such complex metrics that a separate, undeniably expensive meter, is superfluous and an added (and likely undesired) layer of complexity. What is the objective with the meter? How, and in what way would it improve the camera's efforts?

The profiling bit of Sekonic meters is extremely small and seldom used in the wider scheme of their professional working application (it may be done once and once only in specific commercial or scientific areas), It's worth noting also that Sekonic multispot meters have a baseline calibration of 12.6% (reflected) spot and 16.2% incident; this variation alone from the gospel standard of "18% grey" should be sufficient heads-up of the complexity that awaits in those first steps of acquaintance.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 01-06-2020, 10:52 PM  
My beloved original K1000
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 11
Views: 585
A super trooper!
Old cameras have character, far removed from the digital do-it-all-for-you toys that are dominant forces in today's world.:)
Yes you can take the weather-beaten JCII sticker off now. Two of my XAs have the original JCII gold stickers on them.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-06-2020, 06:00 PM  
Battery for Pentax 6x7
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 11
Views: 292
Interesting. There are no 6v silver oxide batteries in Australia. They are all alkaline, and the two spares I have are alkaline, so it is assumed the extra-extra-long lasting 6v battery in Pentaximus, I is alkaline too.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-06-2020, 02:01 PM  
Battery for Pentax 6x7
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 11
Views: 292
The battery..!?
I forgot about that. Haven't seen or changed mine in the P67 for years and years...
PS: If the camera is the MLU version, tape over the MLU nib before stowing in the pack; there is nothing more infuriating than fetching the camera only to find that somewhere along the way it has bumped itself and conveniently flattened the battery. I do carry a spare (possibly two).
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-02-2020, 07:09 PM  
Breaking into medium and want/need advice
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 46
Views: 2,222
Nine times does seem a bit imaginative.
Most of us don't bother with number crunching, happy to go with the statement that 6x7 is a cheerful 400% bigger than the postage stamp-sized 35mm! :lol:
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-02-2020, 04:10 PM  
Breaking into medium and want/need advice
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 46
Views: 2,222
The major problem is that MF beginners, salivating at the prospect of getting their hands on a Hasselblad, where once-upon-a-time the sheer cost was something to behold from a respectable distance, are not, and probably will not be educated correctly as to the modus operandi necessary to fit a lens on and off the way intended. I have seen this situation countless times to the point where perfectly good Hasselblad bodies have been physically held into a bench vice (!) and the infuriated owner, a beginner, no less, wrenching the body to free the lens! The camera and lens are thusly reduced to nothing.


You're right, these situations won't occur when the camera and lenses are used correctly. But they very commonly are not! And repairers where I am see a steady stream of "faulty", "not working" or "plainly stuck lense [sic]" Hassies, some of which have been attacked by anything form a bench vice (mentioned above), pliers, vice grips, etc... Instructions must, must, must, must be supplied by sellers of Hassies to any person unfamiliar with these cameras with the added advice, RTFM!! ;)
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-01-2020, 10:00 PM  
Breaking into medium and want/need advice
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 46
Views: 2,222
There is a clear and meaningful distinction that must be noted between engaging leaf shutter mode and cocking the shutter - - two different, but essentially related actions. Engaging the leaf shutter is done by rotating the ring [on the LS lens] to a shutter speed marked; cocking the leaf shutter is physically pushing the lever down before each exposure. One thing cannot be done without the other, either way. The FP (camera) shutter must be set to 1/8s; any higher and it will not synchronise. Additionally note that the TTL meter is inoperative when and LS lens is operated in LS mode, nor can mirror lock-up be used.

I do not recommemd leaf shutter lenses for use by beginners with these cameras, because of the lack of clarity and understanding of their modus operandi and precautions in use (e.g. the 165mm LS cannot be used for multiple exposures as for the 90mm because of jamming, in some cases, irrecoverable). I see enough problems like this with Hasselblad users completely unfamiliar with and very often careless with them.

---------- Post added 2nd Jan 2020 at 04:09 PM ----------




A lot of my pics are 6x7, of course! But then I crop to the much-loved, Hasselblad-flavoured 6x6 format for added sexiness! :lol: Yes, you can do wonders with 6x7...
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 01-01-2020, 03:31 PM  
Tips on buying lenses for Pentax 6x7?
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 9
Views: 437
"The person I bought it from told me about the right way/order to mount and dismount the prism and lens. The light meter seems to work fine, but I will have to do some testing."

Yes indeed, especially if you are using transparency (slide) film, as the meter has a narrow (and perhaps erroneous) 5-stop range (+2.5/-2.5); this is well within tolerance for most transparency films but it still requires individual determinations to be made as to what is "too little" or "too much" when relying on the camera's meter, along with separate determinations when using a hand-held meter for exposures beyond the camera's limit of 1 second.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-31-2019, 09:52 PM  
6x7 film lever issue
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 7
Views: 333
Video proves this is a winding mechanism fault. - - > Service.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 12-30-2019, 08:10 PM  
Tips on buying lenses for Pentax 6x7?
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 9
Views: 437
The rubberised "cobblestone grip" on the later generation SMC Pentax 67-designated lenses is mightily more comfortable than what you will find on the antique Takumars, and yes, they may be listing as more expensive but you are actually paying for very worthwhile improvements, sometimes in cosmetic/handling and others in optical refinements (not many). A few of the old Takumars had quite awkward filter sizes to grapple with, particularly the 55mm; the newer lenses has a more agreeable 72mm filter diameter.

Ensure your camera is thoroughly tested with a lens -- any lens mounted, to ensure it is serviceable into the future. Also read up on one of the more irritating idiosyncracies of this camera (also the Pentax 67, the newer model):

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/58-troubleshooting-beginner-help/372838-...ter-prism.html


---------- Post added 31st Dec 2019 at 02:16 PM ----------



"Thorium", "Radioactive", "Yellowing". Yikes! Yep, Taks with thorium elements exist, and in some places they are highly sought after as curios! That aside, it makes a splendid conversation starter by the warm and cosy fire that you folks are jostling to get more of, while down here in Australia we're swimming virtually every morning and night to escape both the heat and the approaching bushfires (calls gone out to the US and Canada to send down firefighters to help!!)
Forum: Post Your Photos! 12-29-2019, 02:07 PM  
Kite Flyer
Posted By Silent Street
Replies: 13
Views: 335
Unfortunately, the image is underexposed. Regarding polarisers, these have no effect when the sun is directly in front of the camera. Because POLs reduce the amount of light coming in through the lens (1.5 to 2 stops, typically), unless compensation is made, it will contribute to underexposure.
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