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Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 1 Day Ago  
My K5iis will not power on
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 9
Views: 395
Glad you're back up and running. Sometimes an older battery will measure the proper voltage (when charged) but the internal resistance has become so high that when one attempts to pull current from it, the voltage falls and is insufficient to power a camera. Ordering a new battery as you indicated is a good idea and will probably renew your K5II's clicking days. Batteries have limited lifetimes and sometimes the only way to find the limit is to have them fail.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 2 Days Ago  
LiveView Shows Different Focus Point
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 24
Views: 637
When I stated that Liveview is the best way to focus, I was referring to manual focus and not AF. Liveview AF does have its issues, however with manual Liveview focus using magnification, there are no focusing servo problems. This too has issues in that it's a subjective visual judgement just where the best focus is, and it can be hard to set the best point using a focusing ring on a lens this way.
Forum: Welcomes and Introductions 2 Days Ago  
Moon shots with K-70
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 9
Views: 243
Manual exposure = manual focus & manual f-stop (probably what I should have said:))

---------- Post added 09-17-2021 at 09:51 AM ----------

Best to use the Looney-Tooney "histogram" which will show overexposure if you're going for capturing the full range of brightness (well, that's close to impossible but "more of the full range"). Short using a histogram, bracketing around a good looking exposure will help.

Then, there's HDR which is another topic and best left for another thread.
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 2 Days Ago  
Any way to invert live view?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 13
Views: 660
You can buy glasses which have inverting prisms in them (used for research purposes - and fun). Popping these on would give you the upside-down view you need and then you can take them off before you kill yourself trying to walk:)

amazon.com: The UpsideDownChallenge Game for Kids & Family - Complete Fun Challenges with Upside Down Goggles - Hilarious Game for Game Night and Parties - Ages 8+ : Toys & Games?tag=pentaxforums-20&
Forum: Welcomes and Introductions 2 Days Ago  
Moon shots with K-70
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 9
Views: 243
The moon is an object lighted the same as a daylight lighted object here on Earth. This means that you would start with an exposure near what you'd use for something in a daylight situation (about 1/100s, 100 ISO, & f16 or the equivalent thereof, probably a higher shutter speed and a mid-f stop value for your lens to improve sharpness). The moon adds some complexity in that it's very contrasty and it's easy to blow out the highlights, so you might want to underexpose slightly and then adjust in post-processing. Many autofocus systems are dumbfounded because they see the bright object against total darkness; hence, manual exposure is probably best.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 2 Days Ago  
LiveView Shows Different Focus Point
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 24
Views: 637
He was saying he wasn't observing as good a focus with a taken picture as with Liveview (assuming this is on the LCD screen). I know this to be well and true since Liveview uses video peaking which makes a Liveview image appear (considerably) sharper than the same on the screen right after taking a photo. This can be made up for in post. Secondly, he states that the VF focus doesn't agree with the Liveview. This could be due to diopter issues if using the visual sharpness of the VF image for a reference, but it is most likely due to variability in the VF focusing system (if using AF) which may be reading the "sweet spot" differently than Liveview, the latter of which is absolutely correct since it is taken directly from the sensor. As AstroDave suggested, the OP should be using manual focus and is better off using Liveview as a reference.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 3 Days Ago  
LiveView Shows Different Focus Point
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 24
Views: 637
Liveview will show the image just as the sensor sees it so it's the ultimate in obtaining correct focus. If the focus through the viewfinder differs, then your camera is not focusing where it should using the VF system. It could be that a camera adjustment (backfocus adjustment) for individual lenses is allowed (e.g. the K-1) which would address this.

Focus peaking is often used in Liveview so the image will appear sharper on the LCD screen while focusing than it will after the shot is taken. This can be handled in post-processing by enhancing some of the details using sharpening, so no worries.

For the purpose you describe, Liveview is definitely the way to go and use magnification if you have it to get a critical focus.
Forum: Welcomes and Introductions 5 Days Ago  
New To Full Frame Digital
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 11
Views: 227
Well what else would you buy coming from a youthful exposure to the full-frame film format? Know what, your arms will grow in strength with the K-1 if you use it. It's great exercise and it takes pretty good pictures too. You're not daft nor crackers, and are entitled to the full bragging rights this purchase will deliver. The more this camera gets to know you, the more it will perform, the stronger your arms will become, and you'll start running out of wall space for the great photos! Best wishes on a cherished friendship with this new partner (no offense to any other partners, they'll just have to put up with your new friend). By all means, take it out the front door and introduce it to the world.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 6 Days Ago  
Prism desilvering
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 5
Views: 471
Even a used K1000 isn't that expensive to steal a prism from (or just replace your existing camera), assuming you get one which doesn't have the same issue.

PENTAX K1000 35mm SLR Film Camera with 50 mm lens Kit + Extras 27075045002 | eBay

Also see: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/8-pentax-film-slr-discussion/318347-k100...questions.html
Forum: General Photography 6 Days Ago  
Photographing artwork
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 14
Views: 581
How is the color appearing on your LCD screen? Is the blue missing there also? If not, then the camera is "seeing" the color properly - just not getting it to the final image as it should. If the blue is missing on the LCD screen, you can play around with camera settings to see if you can fix the issue there. There are some pigments and colors which are very difficult to image correctly and it may the case for this issue.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 6 Days Ago  
Monitor black
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 15
Views: 660
If it's like the K-1, you have options in the info menu. Hitting the info button twice will bring up screen options and for the K-1, it's the third option to the right ("screen off"). If you hit info, your screen should not blank but allow you to see these options. You want the first option to the left and not the third which is probably the cause of your black screen. Not sure if it's the same for the K3 III.
Forum: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 09-11-2021, 04:40 PM  
Old Flash Units - Can Trigger Voltages Harm User?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 19
Views: 773
Thought some here might find the explanation interesting. There are a lot of older flashes laying around which have nearly the same circuit. Note that the high voltage from the main capacitor should not be available at the flash trigger contacts (well, actually it is the same voltage value-wise, but it's across a 0.02 microfarad capacitor and not the main cap, the latter of which would pack a much larger wallop should one access that).

Zeners are available up into the 200 volt range and are made by connecting lower value Zener elements in series. In the case of this flash circuit, the Zener is used to drop the high voltage so it won't appear at the transistor circuit which disables the oscillator (which would destroy Q3, and possibly Q1, and Q2). This works as long as a small current is pulled through the Zener (always used in reverse breakdown mode, hence we're dealing with a negative voltage on the right side of D2 relative to its left side).
Forum: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 09-11-2021, 08:23 AM  
Old Flash Units - Can Trigger Voltages Harm User?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 19
Views: 773
This is a classic "old style" flash circuit. The left portion of the circuit is an oscillator which produces a high voltage on the right side of the main flash transformer (more of a pulse type waveform rather than a sinewave). Resistance in the transformer and current limiting by the oscillator circuit produces only a certain amount of current out of the transformer (capacitor C1 also has a role in limiting current). This is rectified by the left facing diode and the main capacitor (C2) charges over time. This circuit is totally dependent on the firing voltage of the (neon) lamp for its final flash lamp voltage. When that (neon) lamp fires, a negative voltage (limited by the Zener) is fed back to transistor, turning it on and killing the oscillator which stops the charging process. That (neon) draws very little current and will stay lighted until the main capacitor voltage falls significantly, at which time it will go out and the oscillator will again begin charging the main capacitor until the charging lamp again lights. In the meantime, the trigger capacitor (C3) charges through the 1 MegOhm R2 resistor to the same voltage as is on the flash lamp. When the flash contacts are closed, C3 discharges through the trigger transformer primary (R2 is essentially and open circuit during this time), producing a much higher voltage within the flash lamp which creates an ionizing path for the main discharge. Of course, that turns off the (neon) lamp and the charging process starts all over again until the (neon) lamp fires. I've seen a lot of these which run the flash lamp at 300 Volts or thereabouts, but more powerful flashes can run the flash lamp at considerably higher voltages. High speed flashes use a smaller flash capacitor to get the high speed so they must run the flash lamp at 1000 volts or more to get adequate output (and the flash lamp must be designed to take the extreme mechanical shock of the discharge). Newer circuits have greatly improved on this old classic, but the charging process is similar. New designs can stop the flash lamp discharge before it completely discharges the charge capacitor, meaning a saving of energy, and controlled length (output) discharges. This also allows very short discharge duration but at lower outputs compared to flash systems designed for high speed use.

Note: I placed (neon) in parenthesis because this is a special lamp designed to fire at higher voltages than a typical neon lamp which can fire as low as 50-60 volts. The gas mixture and electrode spacing is modified to get a higher breakdown voltage for the lamp used. As the lamp ages, it's trigger voltage will typically increase causing the flash output to increase - not that reliable a control over flash output, but it worked in "those" days.
Forum: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 09-10-2021, 07:10 PM  
Old Flash Units - Can Trigger Voltages Harm User?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 19
Views: 773
One thing which greatly reduces any hazard (if there is one to begin with) is that touching exposed contacts, discharges the current through one's finger or hand and the current isn't routed through the heart. Electrocution often occurs because the path is hand to hand, hand to foot, or foot to foot (often the case for lightning). Inter-pinkie isn't a heart stopper under normal circumstances, and with 300 Volts on a 0.02 microfarad capacitor less than 1 milli-Joule of energy), not much to worry about. I've had a finger discharge (450 Volt microwave power supply) which left a small entry hole charred in the finger, yet no electrocution because it exited my watchband (same hand, and yes the hole did heal up over time). Still, does one like being stung by a hornet????
Forum: General Photography 09-09-2021, 01:21 PM  
Poll: How large does everyone here print?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 33
Views: 884
To clarify my vote. I have printed all the way up to 16 x 20 inch prints but I have those done for me since my printer is limited to around 11 x14 inches. However, I have printed 8 x 24 inch panoramas on quite a few occasions since my printer will handle those. I think they also qualify as "large" prints. Most of my prints are in the 5 x 7 to 11 x 14 inch range so don't take my response as 16 x 20 inch prints being the only size I print (and I do send the occasional electronic prints to others as well). I could have checked all the boxes up to and including the 16 x 20 size (but not the third choice) if given that option.
Forum: General Photography 09-09-2021, 07:42 AM  
Will Pentax use the 43 MP Sony APC sensor for the next K-3?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 53
Views: 1,921
Articulated: "two or more sections connected with a flexible joint"

I think the K-1 screen qualifies. If you are referring to "articulated with forward looking capability", then the K-1 is not included.
Forum: Pentax Full Frame 09-07-2021, 06:28 PM  
Crop Focus Mode in K1 ll
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 16
Views: 619
APS-C lenses will work fine on the K-1 as long as they have a Pentax mount. In crop mode and Live-view, the LCD screen will "stretch" the image to full coverage of the screen. Through the viewfinder (in VF & crop mode), you have crop marks which appear, indicating the crop field (and the periphery of the viewfinder will fade to black due to the less than FF coverage of the APS-C lens unless it happens to cover FF). You'll have a reduced file size in crop mode compared to a FF lens and FF mode (fewer pixels).

An option with the K-1 is you can shoot in FF mode even with a APS-C lens and then crop the image in post. Some APS-C lenses have coverage beyond the official APS-C range and this will allow you to make use of that extra. In this case, you get the full-size FF file size which will be reduced in size when you crop in post. It can be advantageous to shoot in crop mode since the smaller file size for each frame will allow more (frames) on an SD card, but that's usually of secondary importance given the huge storage size of today's cards.

Note: You can also do the reverse and use crop mode with a FF lens, in which case you get a smaller file, and the APS-C portion of the FF field. However, you permanently lose the extra part of the FF field as it is not saved to the card.
Forum: Pentax Price Watch 09-07-2021, 02:31 PM  
K 50mm f/1.2 at Samy's Camera in California for $175
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 7
Views: 352
Forum: Photographic Technique 09-07-2021, 07:56 AM  
Under-exposure with "Sunny 16" rule
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 79
Views: 2,446
The "Rule" will also depend on your lens and the loss of light as it travels through it. F-stops don't take this into account whereas T-stops do (and is one reason they are used on cinematic lenses and the like). Although lens coatings reduce light lost at each lens surface, some is still reflected or absorbed, and doesn't reach the film or sensor. This probably doesn't account for all of your exposure discrepancy, but may contribute to it, and as mentioned, this rule is a rule of thumb and not a solid guide you can absolutely depend on.
Forum: Photographic Technique 09-06-2021, 07:27 PM  
Macro Tips for nighttime photos of spiders under streetlights?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 9
Views: 536
I played with the last shot using levels and contrast, and it isn't too bad. The only issue is washed out whites. I would suggest you use some exposure compensation to prevent the highlights from washing out (the spiders' bodies to be more specific). The in post processing you should be able to pull more out of the photos. If you have anything which can make a diffuser out of (like a stretched piece of white cloth) and get that between the spider and the light source, it might help. Also you might use some aluminum foil to make a reflector and get some light from a different direction on the spider of interest. The foil will help diffuse the light some while you're at it. Just my two cents.

Great looking arachnids!! Wouldn't want one of those down my neck:)
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 09-06-2021, 07:21 AM  
light leak, developing error, or even x-rays?
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 8
Views: 433
Are you developing your own film. If so, you can try the daylight exposure of your camera (once you load and advance the film to the first frame) and then in a darkroom or film bag, take a snippet off the roll of film and develop that to see if you have any fogging. It will show up on unexposed film and this way you don't have to wait for a whole roll of film before you're able to analyze it (which might be fogged).
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 09-05-2021, 04:15 PM  
Pentax FB-10 compact binoculars alignment
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 2
Views: 288
That might be a factory job because in most high quality binoc's they fill them with dry nitrogen (or another inert) gas to prevent internal condensation and fogging in cold weather. If you open them, you'll lose the gas charge. A factory repair will fix your alignment, check the seals and refill the gas as part of the service.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 09-04-2021, 11:03 AM  
Help with soccer photos that aren't sharp
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 52
Views: 2,246
Again, your photos don't look that much less sharp than the comparison photo you provided. I'd try a little sharpening on your photos in post-processing and submit:)
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 09-04-2021, 08:43 AM  
Help with soccer photos that aren't sharp
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 52
Views: 2,246
It could be a combination of things. Your first shot indicates your lens was working pretty wide open due to the narrow depth of field it shows (your subject is relatively sharp but the foreground and background are out of focus). Being wide open will decrease lens sharpness and particularly at the long end of the zoom range which I assume you were using.ISO can make an image appear less sharp due to noise but It doesn't appear to be a factor here. Motion blur is not visible in any of the shots so you might make a compromise and shoot at a slightly lower shutter speed (or a bit higher ISO) so you can close the lens down a bit. That should improve the sharpness (and gain you some depth of field which comes in handy if you miss your focus point by a small amount). A good way to do this is with aperture priority. If you find an aperture which lets you reach the shutter speed desired with a given ISO, you can use that for many of your shots. On the other hand, sometimes you want to blur the foreground and background to draw attention to the subject, so you can dial the aperture to a lower value but perhaps at the cost of some sharpness. Your second posted photo, really isn't that bad and unless printed to a large size, is pretty acceptable.

Shooting sports is challenging and there are a lot of experts in this forum who can chime in and give you better advice than I can offer, but I think using a little smaller aperture will help your image quality.
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 09-03-2021, 06:05 PM  
Rokinon??
Posted By Bob 256
Replies: 11
Views: 711
Thanks Steve. That was part of my interest so I could compare it to the Pentax 35mm. Your responses and the others fit the bill for my curiosity.

And by-the-way, Nikor did make enlarging lenses which are highly regarded. One of those in the box would be appreciated:)
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