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Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-18-2020, 12:35 PM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
Pretty funny. Sounds like that 0.1% hard at work.

But we're behind the times here in Ontario. The campgrounds have yet to outfit all trees with outlets to plug in our slide projectors.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-18-2020, 09:38 AM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
What I was implying, in a roundabout kind of way, is that Kodak isn't going to be bringing back the Carousel projectors because nobody would want them. While there's interest in transparency film, with a belief it brings something special to the experience, nobody's really planning on projecting them up on a screen anyway (yes, there will be a few diehards out there who seek out an old projector that still works, and a screen that hasn't gone yellow). The last 10 years I shot slide film, pretty much none of them went inside my projector - they all got scanned and enjoyed on a computer screen, or turned into nice inkjet prints. I face the fact that I could have more easily shot negative film, and still scanned and printed. Any special qualities my transparency film had, could likely have been equaled by colour, saturation, etc. adjustments in Photoshop.

What the newbie millennial photographer imagines they will get from cracking open a box of re-minted Ektachrome baffles me. Their images will be scanned and put up on a computer screen 99.9% of the time.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-11-2020, 09:42 AM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
Yes, and one thing often overlooked is that digital bodies are often much more durable than their film predecessors. I'd be surprised if a basic camera like the *ist and others in its class back in the mid-'90s-2000's were designed to last much more than an average of 20,000 exposures or so.

That doesn't sound like much today, but that was at least 500+ rolls of film, and the average customer of cameras like that would probably never shoot more than 20 rolls of film through it a year. If you shot more than that, you probably had more than one camera body. At that rate, the camera would last 25-30 years, perhaps (and we all know of plenty that have died before that level of wear and tear). Plastic gears, and other inexpensive, lightweight assemblies couldn't be expected to go the distance like a bigger, heavier, more costly pro-oriented body (for the photographer who would shoot five rolls a film a day).

Early digital bodies wore out their shutters and mirror mechanisms pretty quickly, even if they didn't have to transport film, and were expected to go 50k exposures - because their owners were literally shooting ten times as much as they did with film. Fortunately, those buyers didn't gripe much because they were quickly moving on to higher megapixel, better featured new offerings. But the manufacturers quickly realized they had to come up with more efficient ways to make shutters and mirror boxes last 80-100k exposures.

Those lessons could be transplanted onto a newer issue film body, although there's been no comparable development of film transports for better reliability - and that's where many of the low cost film bodies fell down.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-09-2020, 10:40 AM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
While the *ist must have had its fans, they were few and far between. Lightweight plastic build, dim and small viewfinder, buzzy and noisy AF - Pentax at that time seemed in a race to the bottom with Minolta. To be fair, Nikon and Canon were at that time fishing in their waters with low cost models that carried their higher profile brand names: "Hey, I can buy a Canon for the price of that Pentax ..." Minolta seemed to come off the worst for it, with models that built reputations for unreliability.

And Pentax didn't really seem too fussed that their SLRs weren't topping the sales charts - they were doing really well with their Espio series that appealed to a much, much wider audience.

All the lower cost SLRs from that era are pretty much gathering dust these days. From my experience, nearly all those looking to pick up film photography are looking for a classic, chrome and leatherette, knobs and dials experience.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-05-2020, 02:28 PM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
Uh, not really. When I had my Hasselblad a few years ago, I came across a Polaroid back for it. Suddenly inspired to do something great with it, I got some of the Fuji peel-apart film for it (FP-100C) still available at the time, and took it on a short photo safari in a local park.

Yeah, the back is big, and the film has an image area of about 72x94mm, but I somehow failed to realize that the film gate of a 'Blad is about 55x55mm. For a final print, that's pretty darned tiny, and my plans to "do something" with the images amounted to nothing.

I suppose some avant garde photographer could (and probably has) take one of the tiny images, and frame it inside a giant 24x36 inch frame and hang it in a gallery, forcing the viewer to get really close and personal to the work to see what has been photographed, and get their mind blown by the sense of scale that implies (glass of gallery champagne in hand, of course).

Polaroid backs for medium format and 35mm cameras were never really intended to be anything other than exposure and lighting checkers for commercial photographers. You looked at the instant image with a magnifier to be sure all was good, before putting the real film into the camera. Even if it cost a couple of bucks, the Polaroid got tossed in the trash, but was worth it to make sure you didn't have to come back and re-shoot the location because you screwed something up in the lighting.

Many of the ones custom built for 35mm bodies used a short fiber optic stack to pipe the film plane image a few millimeters back to the film pack. This, of course, means the image was actually just a cluster of pixels with the resolution of the fibers. Not high quality, and not intended for anything other than exposure checking.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12-04-2020, 08:33 AM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
Yeah, I don't quite get the interest in resurrected slide film. It's not like Kodak's going to bring back the Carousel projectors to go along with it. While we can all recall our preferences for a particular slide film, or negative film, over another, most of these differences in colour balance, saturation, etc, can be minimized in the scanning and processing these days. The main reason I was a slide film fan when I first got serious about photography was that my images came back as I intended them. If I went for some underexposure, the lab couldn't brighten it up in printing. If I used a light blue filter for a cooler image, the lab couldn't warm it up in printing. But these benefits disappear when you stuff your negative or slide into the scanner.

And as for the comment that the webverse wants the K1000 back at $200 or so, I might point out that's what the pre-China K1000s cost back in 1980. By the time they were discontinued in 1998 or so, the Chinese ones were selling for $499 locally. Reverse adjusting for inflation, a $200 K1000 today should have cost about $80 back in 1980.

If we're going to dream, I'd like Ricoh to buy up the design for the Contax S2 and bring it back with a K-mount on it.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 11-28-2020, 08:49 AM  
Has Pentax ever decided to...
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 105
Views: 4,151
I think Pentax would be between a rock and a hard place if they ever decide a 35mm film SLR would be a good addition to their lineup.

The kind of camera for which there would be the most demand would be a traditional manual SLR like the good old K1000. Trouble is, a mechanical body like the K1000 needs lenses with an aperture ring - and Pentax no longer makes a full lineup with them.

So, do they re-introduce lenses with aperture rings to support a niche film body? Or do they go electronic body control so the camera could work with all D-FA lenses, and end up with a camera with much less retro appeal?

Neither option works until all those lovely vintage film bodies wear out and demand for new ones spikes heavily.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 11-07-2020, 09:24 AM  
Spotmatic F wiring for front plate
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 7
Views: 566
I took the cover off a Spotmatic F I have here. It is wired, from the bottom: white, orange, black then grey.

However, I notice yours has the grey wire on the third contact - but since that's connected to the fourth contact anyway (see the tiny jumper trace that connects the two behind the retaining hook) they could be wired in either way with no difference.

So, it looks like in your camera the black wire came loose from the fourth contact from the bottom - the one between the retaining hook, and the pressure switch.
Forum: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio 10-28-2020, 10:03 AM  
Where did Hammerhead Flash Go?
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 13
Views: 900
I would tie the demise of the hammer handle flash with the rise in ISO of typical colour films, and the arrival of more efficient shoe mount units.


When the hammer handle ruled supreme in the hands of the event photographer, many colour films were ISO 64 or 125. A big blast of light was needed to get any distance to the subject. Also, their bigger batteries offered quicker recycling than AA-powered unit.


By the 1990s, films were typically faster, and event photographers were being groomed to abhor the edge shadows produced by a side-mounted flash. Brackets like the very popular Stroboframe were used to keep flash units above the lens and shadows down behind the subject at all times - no exceptions. And the bigger units mounted up on top of such a bracket were generally powerful enough to do the job with the newer films. They also recycled much quicker, given newer battery tech.


These days, I see wedding photographers mainly using flash as a fill light, given the high ISO performance of recent full-frame cameras. They don't bother with brackets any more, and just use the hot shoe.

A camera, or flash specialty company, could certainly re-introduce a powerhouse hammer handle flash unit today - but it would sell very poorly.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 10-20-2020, 08:21 AM  
Pentax medium format 2021
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 16
Views: 1,845
I remember when first hearing of the 645D that I thought it was a wasteful move for Pentax. Spending resources on developing a camera that would become a flagship almost no one would ever see, and few would be aware of. I really wanted to see Pentax grow their DSLR lineup to better compete in the APS-C and eventually FF market - but no, selling tens of MF cameras was considered more important.
I get it. Pentax had their pro-camera cred when they had their 645 and 67 lineups competing with the likes of Mamiya, Bronica, and Hasselblad. But MF these days is a very, very tiny share of the market. And now, that tiny share is being dominated by the drive to mirrorless, only just after Pentax launched their much improved 645Z. I think Pentax can be forgiven for letting MF slide and get on with trying to make their DSLR lineup more relevant in a "only mirrorless is cool" world.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10-20-2020, 08:10 AM  
Sunny 16 rule with Kodak Tri-x 400
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 64
Views: 2,883
Yes, Sunny 11 is often closer to the mark under most sunny day conditions. To get a full f16 over the shutter speed closest to ISO rating, you have to have an absolutely clear day, with very clear atmospherics. And the earth has to be at its closest to the sun - which is actually in January, I am told.

Around here, in Ontario, with a very clear crisp January day, I can get my light meter to show a fully Sunny 16 reading. About any other time, a half stop to a full stop is usually required.
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 10-07-2020, 08:28 AM  
Pentax Lens Application Idea
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 14
Views: 1,059
But if this was implemented, and worked well, what would we wonder about in bed awaiting sleep?
Forum: General Photography 10-01-2020, 08:33 AM  
Polarizing Filters: Bell's Theorem
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 16
Views: 2,891
Aha! I think I have figured it out. With a bit more internet research, it turns out the third polarizer doesn't come after the first two, but must be inserted between them. I didn't get that from the initial video - which I think to most of us made it look like the last polarizer undid the cancelling actions of the first two.

So, to be clear, polarizers A and B are set to cancel each other out, then polarizer C is inserted between them at a forty-five degree angle and light is passed through.

However, this does seem a bit underwhelming - and not the "mind blowing" effect I thought I was seeing in the video.

Logically, polarizer A and C are at forty-five degrees, and so you get a half polarizing effect. Polarizer B at the back is another forty-five degrees rotated (at 90 to polarizer A) and you lose more light, but not all.

So, half of a half, is a quarter, and that looks like about what you get after the third polarizer.

I know, I get it. Theoretically, the rear polarizer should cancel out the front one entirely, but doesn't when there's another one in between. Still, it's a lot less magical than how it is presented in the video.

My gallery opening for landscapes taken with quantum entangled light has been cancelled.

---------- Post added 10-01-20 at 11:35 AM ----------



Actually, that's all a variable ND filter is. The trick is putting them into one thin frame so they don't vignette a wide angle lens.
Forum: General Photography 10-01-2020, 07:49 AM  
Polarizing Filters: Bell's Theorem
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 16
Views: 2,891
I think I'm ready to call hoax on this. The video looks convincing, but I can't replicate what they're doing on my light table with three regular linear polarizers. Circular polarizers don't work at all for cancelling each other out.

And it makes some sense. Universities have spent big money firing single photons through slits in dark rooms to explore the quantum nature of light. If all they had to do was play with three ordinary polarizers to see quantum entanglement with the naked eye ... well, why wouldn't they?

Also, how have we not heard of this before? If all we had to do was stack three polarizers in front of our lenses - the front one at zero degrees, the middle one at ninety degrees, and the rear one at forty-five degrees, we could all have been making magical photos with quantum entangled light. I can see the gallery brochure now ... "Quantum Landscapes".

How would our pet photography look, or the leaves on our backyard trees look (favourite Pentax lens test targets) if our sensors were recording only quantum filtered light?

Sorry, but I just can't make it work. I put it out there to other Pentaxians to "peer review" the video and see if they can replicate the phenomenon. Is there something extra special about their setup? The polarizers are touted to be ordinary camera ones (again, circular polarizers cannot work in this experiment - but I tried them anyway). Is there something special about their light source? Or their camera?

But again, I come back the realization that I've been mucking about with polarizers for years, and I think I might have noticed if a third one cancelled out the effects of two others.

If anyone can enlighten me (or their polarizers) without video special effects, please let me know.
Forum: General Photography 09-30-2020, 11:18 AM  
Polarizing Filters: Bell's Theorem
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 16
Views: 2,891
Well, I took three polarizers and tried this experiment on my light table.

Can't figure out what I'm doing wrong, but I can't get it to work.

Once the first two are fully polarized, the third polarizer doesn't make anything lighter.

So ..... ?
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 09-24-2020, 08:25 AM  
Rear element, A*135f1.8
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 3
Views: 826
Yes, best send it to someone with equipment and experience.

As for the "spot" not affecting image quality, I think it actually might.

Defects on the rearmost elements seem to be more detrimental to image quality than spots, dust and scratches up front. It's especially terrible on a wide angle, where a mark really scatters light on its way to the sensor or film, but I would a think a fast telephoto would benefit from a clarity in its rear elements as well.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 09-11-2020, 09:59 AM  
K1000 jamming when advancing film
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 9
Views: 544
The one quirk I've found with the K1000 over the years, is that it's possible to load the film with the cartridge lips catching behind the pressure plate, and that causes stuttering film advance - and more than a few scratches on the resultant film.

I usually show beginners with the K1000 to make sure the film cartridge is sitting flat, with the film smooth across the film gate, before closing the door. Even experienced owners can make the error every once in awhile, and close the door with the cartridge up in the air a bit. Most cameras will press the cartridge down flat, but the K1000 can snag it behind the pressure plate.


However, the OP has had the camera some time, and is probably aware of this. So, yes, a rough film advance suggests service is needed, and hard-to-find parts may be needed.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 09-01-2020, 01:21 PM  
Regular Marks on Negatives
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 19
Views: 1,104
I don't think agitation explains marks that only appear at frame edges. From what I can see from the one example shown, I might suspect a light reflection from the edge of the film gate. You also get similar things showing up on the very edges of prints made with a negative in a shiny edged film holder.

Interior surfaces in a camera need to be as non-reflective as possible - matte black, or flocked black surfaces help. Shiny black metal is still shiny. If you see a shiny surface or two right at the film gate (lock the shutter open on bulb to inspect it - not easy on a medium format camera. Multiple exposure mode can help) then reducing shiny surfaces with some matte black paint may indeed help.
Forum: Photographic Industry and Professionals 08-25-2020, 01:31 PM  
Curious about new T mount lens from Tokina
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 3
Views: 1,281
Back when 500mm f8 reflex lenses were very popular it was typical for the aftermarket companies to make them in T-mount, as there was no need for any couplings for metering or aperture on most cameras. If your camera was manual or aperture priority a t-mount lens was pretty easy to use. Some autofocus Minoltas needed some tricks to get them to operate in stop down mode (you usually needed to hold down a couple of buttons while switching it on).

The OEM's made their mirror lenses with fixed mounts for their own cameras, of course, but it was easier and cheaper for the aftermarket makers to go T-mount. Easier for the retailer too. Keeping only a few lenses in stock, but with a drawer full of inexpensive T-mounts made it easy to make owners of less popular cameras happy.

Tamron, of course, had their 500mm mirror in their adaptall mount for years, long after AF cameras took over.

So, yes, it makes perfect sense for Tokina to go T-mount with their new reflex. One lens and a box of T-mounts and you can fit it to every DSLR and mirrorless model on the current market.

You could certainly go that route for the cinema lens crowd, who don't need AF, or any aperture couplings, but for most of us a T-mount lens without modern conveniences is going to be a bit less useful.
Forum: Repairs and Warranty Service 08-07-2020, 09:38 AM  
Komaflex S CLA/repair - any suggestions?
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 4
Views: 499
Leaf shutter SLRs are a nightmare for repairs. With spare parts nonexistent for most, there's not much for the repair tech to work with.

The Zeiss Contaflex series of cameras apparently sold well back in the day, given the large number of them I see. However, pretty much none of them work properly any more - despite looking like they work. Most often the leaf shutter fails to close in that instant before the mirror rises. When the mirror's up, it goes through the motions and closes finally. But the end result will be overexposure.

The thing is the springs that snap the shutter shut before re-opening get weak and sticky. I've serviced them to get them working, only to see them fail again after a month or two. New parts would be needed.

The reason your tech won't touch the Komaflex is simple. To get it working reliably new parts would be needed, but aren't available. Fiddling with the existing parts will take three days on the bench, for which he'll only want to bill you for one day. And six months later, there's a good chance it will be faulty again.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 08-06-2020, 10:29 AM  
Pentax 67 200mm f4 with 2x rear converter minimum focusing distance
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 6
Views: 529
While element size is a factor in determining the effective aperture of a simple lens - such as a single element or doublet lens - it's only part of the formula of a complex lens.

The actual size of the aperture diameter is a bigger factor in deciding light gathering - but again, that varies depending on the formula of the lens. Telephoto lenses employ their design to package more magnification and aperture in a smaller barrel than a simple long focus lens would deliver.

Take for instance the latest crop of super normal lenses. Today's Pentax D-FA 50mm 1.4 needs a 72mm filter size to surround its whopping front element of the 15 element total. The older FA 50mm 1.4 fits its front element inside a 49mm filter mount. Both are 1.4 lenses, but one has a much larger front diameter than the other - a more complex formula with more corrections offered by many more elements (15 vs. 7).

However, if you were to pull both lenses apart and measure the actual largest diameter the aperture mechanisms opened up to, I expect you'd find they'd be pretty close.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 07-31-2020, 07:34 AM  
Pentax 67 200mm f4 with 2x rear converter minimum focusing distance
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 6
Views: 529
It should be the same as the lens minimum distance without the converter.

Neat things about teleconverters; they increase the magnification, lose some light, but don't change the focusing.
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 07-14-2020, 02:01 PM  
Repair for a Pentax FA 80-160
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 3
Views: 396
Yes, the Pentax 645 lenses work backwards to most. The aperture has to be pushed closed by the camera body's linkage, otherwise the lens wants to be wide open for viewing and focusing. What you're experiencing is the lens is being closed down when it's not supposed to - it's only supposed to close at the moment the picture is taken. That happens when the tab at the right side of the mirror box presses the lever on the back of the lens downward - and this is happening normally on your 45-85.

So, again, something's amiss with your 80-160. It shouldn't be closing down when off the camera. The lever at the 3 o'clock position (when looking at the lens rear) should not move when turning the aperture ring. The aperture should only close when you press that lever downward (clockwise).

Compare that with your 45-85 and you should see the lever hold its position, regardless of aperture position. Pressing the lever will close it to the set aperture, or all the way down when set on "A".
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 07-14-2020, 07:53 AM  
Repair for a Pentax FA 80-160
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 3
Views: 396
If I read your description correctly, it appears the aperture isn't being held open by the camera body when mounted. The tab on the right side of the mirror box should engage the linkage on the back of the lens.

A simple fix might be all that's needed if the lens tab is bent out of alignment. If it's missing because someone removed it or cut it (not impossible in this world of re-purposing lenses for cine use) then that's a problem.

If the linkage is intact, but isn't operating the lens aperture (with the lens off, flick the lever up and down and see if it operates the aperture) then the problem is inside the lens and it will have to come apart.
Forum: Pentax Medium Format 07-10-2020, 01:35 PM  
Pentax 6x7 underexposing
Posted By Ontarian50
Replies: 8
Views: 573
Yes, if the aperture is working properly then the shutter is the issue.

Being an electronically timed shutter, there's a chance (a good chance) the timing solenoid is not delaying the second curtain.

With the lens off fire the shutter at all speeds. If below, say 1/60th, you can't see a noticeable delay in the second curtain, then it needs service. If set at 1s, and it still looks and sounds like 1/125th, then that's your issue.
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