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Forum: Weekly Photo Challenges 2 Hours Ago  
Weekly Challenge Weekly challenge #526
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 1
Views: 55
Weekly Challenge #526 - Transportation in B/W

Challenge #525- Flowers in B&W produced such an impressive set of small subjects in a classic B&W mode I'd like to stay with that mode but open the subject matter to much larger subjects in their recognizable environments and in a broader category and see where that leads.

I propose all types of transportation -- land, sea and air -- in B&W with emphasis on framing, composition and technique that reflects the age and the environment of the subject. I.e., a horse-drawn carriage or wagon in the rural or urban setting in which it's at 'work'. An auto, aircraft, boat, bicycle in its present condition. Something that says "That's where that vehicle belongs" and in B&W as well.

The challenge closes on Saturday, March 6th.

The fine print:
Every week, a new theme is picked and judged by the winner of the previous week.

1. Post ONE photo.
2. The photo must portray an interpretation of the theme.
3. Post your single picture in this thread and explain what motivated you to take the picture and/or how you feel it represents the weekly theme (especially if it's not obvious).
4. The challenge is interactive. Any response is welcome.
5. The judge will pick the WINNERS and choose one of them to be the judge for the next week.
6. This challenge runs for 7 days plus an additional day for the judge to choose the winners.
7. Any Pentax camera can be used.
8. Pictures can be from any time frame, not just within the week of the current theme.
9. In case the winner of a challenge is unable to become the judge for the next challenge, they will PM the #2 winner for that person to be the judge.

A few examples:
Forum: Weekly Photo Challenges 3 Hours Ago  
Weekly Challenge WINNERS-WEEKLY CHALLENGE #525-Flowers in B/W
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 8
Views: 256
These images are each a wonderful example of why B&W is a classic way to present interpreted imagery. Individual flowers are a striking choice of subject material to showcase that presentation. Excellent submissions all and very thoughtful commentary from Noel.

H2
Forum: General Talk 6 Days Ago  
Anyone following the Perseverance (Rover) Mars landing -- less than 40 minutes to go
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 18
Views: 491
Nope. It's the arrival of the first wave of politicians that scares me. :(
Forum: General Talk 02-19-2021, 03:34 PM  
Anyone following the Perseverance (Rover) Mars landing -- less than 40 minutes to go
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 18
Views: 491
That was an impressive display of technology.

But I'm waitin' to see people on the moon again . . . having been there long enough to have to use a lunar outhouse . . . after a festive burritos an' beans celebration. Now that'll be truly superior, all-things-considered, zero-defect engineering at its very best ! ;)
Forum: Weekly Photo Challenges 02-16-2021, 10:25 AM  
Weekly Challenge WEEKLY CHALLENGE #525 - Flowers in B/W
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 18
Views: 1,054
Lily rev
Forum: Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 02-03-2021, 10:33 AM  
Dented lens thread
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 9
Views: 677
What's your tolerance for cosmetics? Here's a field expedient repair of a war-worn Nikkor-s from the '60's. Still serves today.

Cut/file away the distorted portion of the threads. (Dremel tool is quick) The remaining undamaged threads will secure a filter or step-up ring.

If the gap-toothed effect is too unsightly, remove the glass from a cheap filter and secure it in place (super glue?) as new filter attachment threads. Or shot through a UV?

- Notes: The ring extension may have a slight affect on lens hood coverage and/or if using diopter filters.

Lots of unused color filters to scavenge today. (With post processing only POL and diopter filters are useful anyway; color can be tweaked in PP- IMO .)

Fm Catfish: "Forcing a step up ring on ... allowed the use of slightly larger filters.' That works too and saves surgery if it will fit, but no requirement to step up, just fit a new empty ring and continue to use existing filters.
Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 01-16-2021, 09:19 PM  
Advice about teleconverters
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 19
Views: 1,178
A few years ago I had the HD Pentax DA 1.4x AW AF, two Tamron Pz AF 1.4X MC4's, and two Tamron Adaptall 01F TC's along with the Pentax DA* 300, Tamron 70-200 F2.8 Di LD and Adaptall SP 300 F2.8 (360) and SP 80-200 F2.8 LD.


In practical use in the field I could tell no difference in the product of any of the TC's. Shot-to-shot technique and environmental variables were by far the noticeable difference in all images.

I found no advantage to using the Pentax AF in the field with manual focus lenses as I was constantly manually verifying the focus solution.

The 'crop-ability' of high MP sensors has largely taken the place of TC's in my shooting except when using a TC to enhance minimum focus distance.

If a TC is used as a tool to solve a problem with no other option any perceived image quality difference becomes a moot point. I've found no apparent optical difference in MY four Tamron 1.4X TC's not attributable to the age of the older Adaptalls.
Forum: Mini-Challenges, Games, and Photo Stories 01-09-2021, 08:56 PM  
Lets see Bridges
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 2,183
Views: 193,943
Mississippi River at Chester, IL
Forum: Mini-Challenges, Games, and Photo Stories 01-09-2021, 08:54 PM  
Lets see Bridges
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 2,183
Views: 193,943
Deception Pass, Whidbey Island, WA
Forum: Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 12-31-2020, 10:33 PM  
Using heavy lenses with straps
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 26
Views: 1,347
A few years ago I needed a secure means of carrying a K5+DA300 and 70-200 in the field for a coupl'a of days. Don't have pix but you can envision the solution using an arm sling purchased at a convenient Wally-world for less than $10. Augmented the camera strap.

Sometimes a camera and lens was in the sling, sometimes a second lens in the sling. Good relief from the weight and convenient. Didn't interfere with a back pack. Just don't try to include an arm with the gear.
Forum: Site Suggestions and Help 11-19-2020, 09:16 PM  
Question Adam: Loyal Site Supporter renewal?
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 14
Views: 658
Like Carol, I'm thoroughly confused. What is the actual, current status of my donation account(s?)/status? It appears I have three accounts - not my intent.
Forum: Photographic Technique 11-08-2020, 05:29 PM  
Eyes wide open?
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 45
Views: 2,327
Just make one -- so many options and materials. It isn't a critical situation. If action's such you need a eyeball finder, bore sight alignment and a good feel for the FOV is a good as it's gonna get.


I've badly missed the ideal FOV frame on occasion and still come up with unexpected keepers I wouldn't have otherwise. I'd probably not even taken the shot while fumbling with a VF.

Don't let the quest for 'perfection' spoil good enough for a fine image.


Remember: It don' have to be perfect to be awesome.
Forum: Photographic Technique 11-08-2020, 01:04 PM  
Eyes wide open?
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 45
Views: 2,327
That's like the old wire-frame 'sports finder' technique -- goes far back to at least the TLRs -- Try trackin' action on a reversed-image, ground-glass focusing screen -- and Press Graphic days.

Works with the Q too with a l'il Kentucky windage eyeball calibration.

A zero-cost OVF for the Q's - PentaxForums.com
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10-22-2020, 05:05 PM  
Sunny 16 rule with Kodak Tri-x 400
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 64
Views: 3,049
Getting there? Certainly seems so. You're asking the right questions. Hang in there - experience counts.

I've often wished that Kodak film boxes had never published the Sunny Sixteen guide because it suggests that somehow bright sun and f-16 are the critical point of the matter. SS is nothing more than a memory aid that aperture and shutter speed have a reciprocal relationship and that offers a generic description of daylight conditions perhaps more appropriate to the family Kodak Brownie box camera of the '50's than modern cameras.

Let's break down your question a bit. First, where you're standing has no bearing on the matter, it's all about the light on your subject and how you evaluate it as applied to your goal(s) for the image. Within reason, it's your goals that define 'a correct exposure'. Did the end result accomplish what you intended? (And, yes, after post-processing too, whether in digital or a wet darkroom.)

As a caution here, we need to recognize that the term 'incidental' (incident) lighting has a very specific meaning for metering. Briefly, incident light is when you meter facing the light source(s) compared to reflective light which is metered as it's reflected from the subject itself. Both types have their uses.

Using SS is a personal evaluation of the light, the desired result, the gear used and combined with experience. It can be the perfect solution . . . or not.

Then we must take into account the four possible types of electronic metering in use.

Light meters come in many forms, incident, reflective or combined, hand-held and TTL. Each of them have but four modes.

- Spot metering which may vary from about a 15 degree cone to a 1-degree pencil beam. Using it require metering many critical points in the scene and compiling a desired average exposure that, hopefully, neither clips highlights or shadows. Spot metering arguably requires the most experience.

- Averaging which samples the entire scene and provides an indiscriminate average exposure recommendation. If not tweaked, it may be less useful than an educated SS guess.

- Center weighted averaging which gives more weight to selected zones within the scene. Not a bad choice for many scenes. It often biases the top quarter of the image and the corners as appropriate for snapshots, landscapes and 'family group' photos in consumer level auto cameras. This is most like your K1000.

- Multi-zone 'auto intelligent' metering which samples many discrete zones in the scene, recognizes typical patterns of light, and biases exposure on its best guess of the scene. Sort'a like face recognition. That's typical of most modern auto-TTL metering bodies. When it's right it equals expert SS decisions.

Modern electronic metering may also allow you to bias the exposure to favor higher shutter speed for action or smaller apertures for depth of field as for landscapes. This is simply automatically applying SS reciprocal exchange settings in the camera. (that's what Scene Modes do, too; they apply recommended biases and tweaks to 'normal' exposure settings)

As for your question, yes, the K1000 would provide a meter reading for a reflected (not incident) light solution for the scene. BUT... it would be a center averaged reading of ALL the light seen TTL. That may average out OK for you - maybe not.

A better solution would be to close in and meter off of only the primary subject and manually lock that solution before recomposing the scene. Or, if that's inconvenient, meter off of a nearby equivalent subject in similar lighting.

Any modern DSLR serves as a fine handheld meter with the dual advantage of an immediate image preview with histogram and 'blinkies' assistence. Matching film shots one-for-one with digital images is a great learning tool. You have twin images with digital EXIF data for comparison - something not available with film.

You do need to first calibrate all gear and meters to the same standard. A clear or hazy mid-day north sky works well as a cross-calibration light source. Cameras may be synced by tweaking the ISO dial or, on bodies that read the cassette matrix, just use a calibration cheat-sheet. This may take some homework before hand.


[ One really nice, comprehensive resource is Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure" -- often found used on Amazon books ]
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10-21-2020, 11:34 AM  
Sunny 16 rule with Kodak Tri-x 400
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 64
Views: 3,049
Other SS tricks:

There's a natural tendency to focus on the LIGHT. Pay attention to the SHADOWS. Just as there's a difference between 'crispy' light and hazy light, there's also a difference in the shadows that they produce. There can easily be a half- to a full-stop of exposure compensation revealed in the type and presence of shadows and they're often more subtle clues to exposure adjustments than direct light.

In open lighting conditions you will see 'crispy' shadows in 'crispy' light and 'fuzzy-edged' shadows in hazy light. (Or multiple shadows from more than one source, but that's a different topic.)

In open shade, or not in direct light, like under a tree on a sunny day, your subject may have enough incidental or reflected illumination to cast a shadow . . . or perhaps not. (Reflected light can unexpectedly screw with color balance too)

[ Exercises? Easy. Just start paying attention to shadows. After years of practice you'll be able to judge exactly how old a shadow is or how many hours ago it left the scene. ]


Also, there are situations where it will be more convenient, or perhaps even necessary, to estimate (or meter) an equivalent scene.

Given the same lighting conditions, a similar subject will require the same exposure whether near at hand or at a distance. A uniformed player on the sidelines will have the same exposure as one across the playing field or court. The basic exposure will not vary unless the light does so there's no need to 'meter' every shot unless something changes.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10-20-2020, 07:51 AM  
Sunny 16 rule with Kodak Tri-x 400
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 64
Views: 3,049
Two thoughts on working with Sunny Sixteen:

Just in case you haven't noticed, the aperture and shutter speed clicks' on your lens and camera are not 'whole stops', but are typically 1/3-stop intervals. It's sort of like knowing the multiplication tables; if you're not familiar with 'em it's very easy to make mistakes in selecting equivalent exposure intervals. A search on 'f-stop charts' offers many cheat sheets like these.


There's a useful exercise that's a PITA on film but becomes a quick and inexpensive project with digital camera technology. Build a comprehensive Sunny Sixteen matrix using whatever variables factors you prefer on paper -- that helps to stay organized and to troubleshoot and understand the inevitable mistakes.

E.g., a chart that fixes the ISO or light conditions and steps through equivalent apertures and speeds. Or one that fixes aperture and/or speed and changes ISO for a given light condition, etc. Each question you have about exposure can be expressed as a charted exercise.

With film, the delay in darkroom processing before seeing the results was frustrating. Opening an SD card in a browser with side-by-side image comparison and histogram cues is immediately enlightening.

Don't be surprised if supposedly equivalent exposure settings aren't absolutely exact, especially at the far ends of the dial; the mechanical monkey-motion of camera innards isn't always precise. Discovering those variances in your gear and building individual calibration charts for bodies, lenses and light metering systems is part of the 'fun'.

Use mid-morning north sky light on a clear day as a good light calibration reference for metering systems of all sorts. Old selenium cell light meters often have a mind of their own regarding light conditions but can be used effectively if calibrated to a personal standard.

The key to all is having a WRITTEN PLAN before you start. Without that you'd best add a white cane to your gear bag.
Forum: Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10-19-2020, 01:05 PM  
Sunny 16 rule with Kodak Tri-x 400
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 64
Views: 3,049
An important note: With film you're stuck with the loaded film's ISO. Tri-X wouldn't be a good choice of film if anticipating a bright, sunny day. Better to chose a film with a lower ISO to regain more versatility in speed and aperture settings. ISO 100 might be a better choice. Or carry a (mmm, 4-stop?) neutral density filter as recommended above.

If planning to shoot in varying lighting conditions choose film cassettes with 12 or 24 exposures so you can respond to changing conditions without wasting (too much) film. You can also 'hand-load' short cassettes from bulk film. There are tricks for swapping film in mid-roll but . . . you'll only try THAT once! :hmm:

The ability to change ISO at will is one economical advantage of digital cameras.
Forum: Pentax Lens Articles 09-15-2020, 02:18 PM  
Beware cheap "circular" polaizers
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 22
Views: 59,191
A good summary and highlights the economy of high grade filters. A well chosen and intelligently used economy filter can make a notable difference in results and certainly beats not having the too-expensive, gold-plated model in hand.

Three investments one can make in filters (and all other gear) that are free of monetary cost.

1) Research the materials available so as to understand the inherent capabilities and limitations of the device -- RTFM. [ Such as 'The Photographer's Guide to Using Filters', Joseph Meehan. Amphoto Books ]

2) Spend a pleasant hour or more of well informed and dedicated experimentation with a filter involving its anticipated use. Instant review, histograms and comparison frames are wonderful learning tools.

3) Slow down. Spending an extra ten seconds specifically planning intended results and verifying the camera settings before shooting avoids most disappointments when working within the capabilities of one's gear. (That 6-P's thing.)

I don't recall ever snap-shooting something while using special filters or having a linear PL filter screw up focus or exposure while shooting mindfully with gear I understood.


To borrow sage aviation advice: Never let your camera go somewhere your mind hasn't already been. (Works for life too.)
Forum: Pentax Lens Articles 09-13-2020, 10:59 AM  
Beware cheap "circular" polaizers
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 22
Views: 59,191
One thing to keep in mind when using any PL filter; the polarizing effect varies with the angle relative to the sun/light source(s). Using a relatively wide angle lens perpendicular to the direction to the primary light will produce variable polarizing effects across the broad image.


Some folks bad-mouth PL's simply because they use them in adverse conditions. A little thoughtful experimentation with that filter will produce better, and more consistent, results.

Used properly, an economical non-CPL filter will often produce satisfactory results outdoors.
Having said that, a PL filter is one of the few effects you can't reasonably duplicate in post-processing. (The other is a neutral density filter's effect on shutter speed versus motion.)
Forum: Monthly Photo Contests 08-10-2020, 12:40 PM  
Over
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 4
Views: 73
I would like to nominate this photo
Forum: Monthly Photo Contests 08-10-2020, 12:39 PM  
sunset on wrecks
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 3
Views: 105
I would like to nominate this photo
Forum: Monthly Photo Contests 08-10-2020, 12:38 PM  
Phishing the last light
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 9
Views: 240
I would like to nominate this photo
Forum: Winners' Showcase 08-10-2020, 12:33 PM  
July, 2020 Runner-up: Days End
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 109
Views: 1,122
I would like to nominate this photo
Forum: Monthly Photo Contests 08-10-2020, 12:32 PM  
Sunset
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 22
Views: 325
I would like to nominate this photo
Forum: Monthly Photo Contests 08-10-2020, 12:32 PM  
End of another perfect Sydney day
Posted By pacerr
Replies: 48
Views: 660
I would like to nominate this photo
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