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Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 22 Hours Ago  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
I agree completely. Gigapixel AI is likely to produce false textures and unnatural looking results with files from more recent digital cameras over about 12 megapixels, but give it a jpeg from an ancient 3 or 4 megapixel sensor and the results are truly amazing -- huge improvements in detail and sharpness that usually look completely natural.

And as you say, it can work wonders with film, giving 35mm originals an almost medium format look. Film purists are likely to howl at the idea, but personally I'm running my 35mm negatives through Gigapixel routinely nowadays. I haven't actually tried it on any of my old Kodachromes yet, so I think I'll have to give that a go too.:)
Forum: Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Other Camera Brands 4 Days Ago  
The Auto, the Jpg and The Dunning-Kruger Effect
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 52
Views: 1,329
I've been out showing some visitors around Dartmoor today, so I shot jpegs in full auto and uploaded them to facebook as soon as I got home for everyone to enjoy.

That's because an intelligent, skilled, experienced photographer uses the best options for the particular task at hand. Someone who thinks that they've got a one size fits all solution that they have to use in every possible situation is suffering from. . . well. . . the Dunning-Kreuger effect. And if you are serious about your assertion that all photograpers should always use an A1 print as their reference standard, then yep. . . Dunning-Kreuger it is.
Forum: Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Other Camera Brands 4 Days Ago  
The Auto, the Jpg and The Dunning-Kruger Effect
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 52
Views: 1,329
Let's imagine a photographer called Fred or Freda looking at a scene.

Now Fred/Freda might think: Okay, the range of tones in this scene all integrate to mid grey, so autoexposure can handle it no problem. And I like the look of the jpegs that my camera produces, so I'll use jpeg and autoexposure. Fred/Freda is demonstrating skill and experience.

Or Fred/Freda might think: Well, this scene needs a very wide dynamic range to capture the full range of tones. The scene is beyond the limits of my camera's autoexposure system and jpeg engine, so I'll use manual exposure and raw. Again, Fred/Freda is demonstrating skill and experience.

My reading of Eddy's video is that he's saying that having the ability to make an educated choice between raw or jpeg, auto or manual, is in itself a sign of skill and experience.
Forum: Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Other Camera Brands 6 Days Ago  
The Auto, the Jpg and The Dunning-Kruger Effect
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 52
Views: 1,329
People who use Sunny 16 know that the best exposure is the one that will capture the range of tones in the negative or raw file that they need for the finished photo, and in many cases that's a long way from the supposedly "accurate" exposure that a through-the-lens AE system will guess at. So yes, in many cases, the human eye and brain relying on Sunny 16 will do a better job than even the most sophisticated through-the-lens AE metering system.

And Takumar users often employ zone focusing, which gives them absolute confidence that they will get the end result they want and is faster than any AF system.
Forum: General Photography 06-17-2022, 05:27 AM  
Bokeh..just a load of balls?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 127
Views: 4,745
Are the people in Vietnam who work on the assembly line paid enough to buy one of the cameras themselves?
Forum: General Photography 06-17-2022, 01:40 AM  
Bokeh..just a load of balls?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 127
Views: 4,745
It could be argued that obsessive buying of new gear actually does have a negative effect on everyone in some ways though. After all, there's an environmental price to be paid for the raw materials and worldwide shipping of every camera. I'm actually quite happy to see the camera market shrinking with fewer and fewer new releases, and I'd certainly be happy if more photographers stuck with the same camera for five to ten years rather than wanting a new model every season. People in rich countries really need to think a bit more about the global impact of all their consumer goodies.

Sorry for the rant. It's not aimed at you personally. I know you're a thoughtful and ethically aware sort of guy. And yes, I know that talking in my previous post about deliberately wrecking gear makes me look like a hypocrite. In my defence, it's always used gear and at least it doesn't end up as landfill.
Forum: General Photography 06-17-2022, 01:24 AM  
Bokeh..just a load of balls?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 127
Views: 4,745
I think they were more interested in an overall soft focus, low contrast look, and for me they went a bit too extreme with the effect.

As for scratching up a cheap lens, I can highly recommend it. A few years back I sandpapered the front element of an 18-55mm to simulate a few decades of cleaning marks and was very happy with the result. My theory was that some of the character of vintage lenses comes from the wear and tear that the glass has received over the decades, which is why two copies of the same classic lens will never give you exactly the same results.:)

Back on the thread topic, I'm now wondering which modifications to a lens might really have an effect on this bokeh thing that some people seem to care about so much (although I don't myself). Reversing elements should do something, and completely removing the aperture blades might be worth a try. In the past I've experimented with homemade single element lenses too, and you can get surprisngly sharp centres surrounded by some serious blurriness with that method.

I think I'll pop down to the charity shops in town to see if they've got a 5 sacrificial victim lens to do some dastardly bokeh experiments on.:lol:
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 06-15-2022, 01:40 PM  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
I'd never heard of any of them (except perhaps I've seen some Bellocq somewhere along the line). But I promise I won't drop the course, and thanks to Google Images I now think that Les Krims might soon be one of my all-time favourite photographers.:)

Don't want to be a criminologist though. Never could stand the sight of blood.:lol:

(Speaking of criminology, sorry about the thread hijack Mike.)
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 06-15-2022, 12:18 PM  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
Reading that "nature of reality" stuff again after eating dinner, it occurs to me that I might need to adjust my meds.:lol:

Edit:

Although. . . I actually do think there was a stereo (solid) reality there when I took the photo. I don't know what that reality really was, but there are various ways that I can justify saying that my photo of it has got a certain amount of truthiness to what it might have been.

Yep, definitely need to tweak the meds.:lol:
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 06-15-2022, 11:24 AM  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
That's an excellent point. For myself, I use multiple layers exactly as you suggest. Usually Lanczos for the bits of the photo where that works and Gigapixel where it works. Reality is that which existed independently of what we thought about it when we took the photo. A truthful photo is one that comes as close as we can get to the thing that was real.:)
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 06-15-2022, 10:24 AM  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
Somewhere, Bishop Berkeley is applauding you. Personally, I'm a Peircean pragmatist.:)
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 06-15-2022, 10:01 AM  
THIS is why I don't trust AI image processing software...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 50
Views: 2,128
What method are you using to upscale the K3 photo in this example? Up to (and including) Lanczos resampling your example might be true. But if you are using Topaz Gigapixel for the upscaling then artefacts could be generated that might result in visibly false information. I've seen enough of those artefacts myself from Gigapixel to know that they can ruin the upscaling results.

It's not for me to speak for @BigMackCam, but my reading of his original post is that it's things like the false textures that Gigapixel can produce that he's concerned about.
Forum: Post Your Photos! 06-14-2022, 03:32 AM  
21mm Photo Contest Summer Days
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 3
Views: 137
This one is genuinely a great photo. Composition, light, mood and meaning, just perfect. One of the best I've seen on this forum for a long, long time.
Forum: Post Your Photos! 06-14-2022, 02:39 AM  
21mm Photo Contest Technology becomes obsolete while nature endures.
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 2
Views: 168
K1000, Tamron 28mm, Ilford XP2.

Forum: Film Processing, Scanning, and Darkroom 06-14-2022, 02:24 AM  
Developing advice please!
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 6
Views: 543
Give it standard processing. I shot a roll of ColorPlus 200 a couple of months ago and deliberately metered it as ISO 100 because I always shoot C41 a stop slower than box speed. The results were quite fine grained with good colours (naturalistic and not oversaturated) with a pleasing similarity to the Kodak films that I remember from the eighties. A lot like the old Kodak VR emulsions, which I always used to enjoy using.

I shot the last few frames at box speed just as a comparison and the results were noticeably grainier with more muted colours.

A couple of samples from that roll metered as ISO 100:




Forum: Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 06-12-2022, 02:42 AM  
Super Takumar 35mm F2 Infinity adjustment
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 3
Views: 400
As Mike (@BigMackCam) says, if you're using an adapter on a non-Pentax camera that's the most likely cause and a better made adapter is the solution.

If you are using a Pentax camera then we'll need to know which of the two versions of the 35mm/2.0 you've got. The first version is a big heavy lens with a 67mm filter ring, and the second version is much smaller with a 49mm filter ring. Adjusting infinity on the smaller second version is pretty straightforward, but that big first version can be a nightmare to work on.
Forum: General Photography 06-09-2022, 09:37 AM  
Why bother rangefinder ?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 21
Views: 859
Size, weight and simplicity are important factors too, at least for me. I'm tired of big heavy cameras with big heavy lenses.

Nowadays I'm happy with a digital compact for casual snaps, and I'm also in the process of switching to a rangefinder for film because my K1000 plus a couple of lenses is more weight than I want to carry anymore. I used an Olympus XA as my go-to camera for most of the 1990s, so I'm very aware of the high quality that a small rangefinder can produce.

Pentax actually made some reasonably good rangefinder style compact cameras back in the film era (although they were autofocus rather than actual rangefinders). Given that Pentax is dedicated to keeping optical viewfinders alive, I think it would be wonderful to see them release something like a digital version of the Espio 24EW, complete with optical viewfinder. Just look at how well Fuji has done with the X100 series.
Forum: Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 06-07-2022, 09:23 AM  
Any recommendations for a fully manual rangefinder with a 35mm lens?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 38
Views: 1,308
Thanks for that, it was interesting reading. The thing that has really struck me in this thread is how few rangefinders offered a fixed 35mm lens over the years. Personally I'd realised by about 1985 that it was the focal length that worked best for me, and ever since then I've wondered why lenses in the 40-50mm range were usually chosen. Was it really so hard to make a camera with a 35mm lens when the registration distance in the average rangefinder was so short?

The reason why I'm now shopping for an Electro 35CC after asking the question in this thread is almost entirely because of its 35mm lens.:)

Edit: Surely the extra depth of field of a 35mm lens was useful because you could make a compact camera with a shorter rangefinder baseline? Because accurate focus wasn't quite so important.
Forum: Pentax Q 06-07-2022, 09:09 AM  
Is the Q still relevant?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 27
Views: 967
I'd be using a Q without hesitation if they would just make one of the darn things with a viewfinder of some sort. Just give me a 35mm full frame equivalent lens and a clip-on optical viewfinder to match and that'll do for me.:)
Forum: Mini-Challenges, Games, and Photo Stories 06-07-2022, 08:46 AM  
Thematic Moody, minimalist and abstract landscapes and seascapes
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 13
Views: 520
I've always loved a bit of moody minimalism.







And here's one from just last week. Lighting the beacon for Her Imperial Majestyness's Unobtanium Jubilee:



All shot with cameras and lenses.:)
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 06-06-2022, 03:04 AM  
The CCD Sensor Cult. I mean Club...
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 2,026
Views: 122,243
Some snaps from the Torbay Airshow yesterday.

You'll have to imagine the Red Arrows zooming around in the sky in this one. They probably would have been doing something amazing right then if they hadn't been cancelled because of the weather.



And in this one the Lancaster, Spitfire and Hurricane would have been looking all historic and heroic if they hadn't also been cancelled because of the weather.



So it was a pretty depressing day, which is why I decided to sit down on the railway tracks and end it all. But then the train got cancelled.:)



All taken with the Optio W30.
Forum: Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 06-03-2022, 01:42 AM  
Any recommendations for a fully manual rangefinder with a 35mm lens?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 38
Views: 1,308
After overnight consideration and some review reading, I've decided it's going to be the Yashica Electro 35CC for me. I know I said I wanted fully manual, but there's something about that one that's calling out to me and the price is right.

That's the great thing about a thread like this -- you end up discovering that what's right for you isn't actually what you thought you wanted at the beginning.:)

Thanks again to everyone for all the advice. The depth of knowledge and experience on this forum is a joy to behold.:)
Forum: Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 06-02-2022, 09:19 AM  
Any recommendations for a fully manual rangefinder with a 35mm lens?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 38
Views: 1,308
I'm actually very tempted by this one. Do you happen to remember what the shutter defaults to with no battery in the camera? If it defaults to 1/60 then I could actually live with it as single speed camera for the sort of things I shoot. Or does the shutter not fire at all with no battery?
Forum: Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 06-02-2022, 09:14 AM  
Any recommendations for a fully manual rangefinder with a 35mm lens?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 38
Views: 1,308
Oh, I'm liking the look of that Zorki 6. And an auxiliary viewfinder would be no problem as most of the time I'd be happy with zone focusing.

Thanks for all the suggestions everyone. I knew the wealth of knowledge around here would give me plenty of options.:)
Forum: Film SLRs and Compact Film Cameras 06-02-2022, 01:22 AM  
Any recommendations for a fully manual rangefinder with a 35mm lens?
Posted By Dartmoor Dave
Replies: 38
Views: 1,308
Over the past few months I've settled on using a Lumix TZ70 digital compact for snapshots, and film in my venerable K1000 when I want some quality. But in general I'm tired of lugging around big, heavy interchangeable lens cameras and I'd much rather be shooting with something more compact. So my question is exactly as in the thread title: Can anyone recommend a compact rangefinder with a 35mm lens? Fully manual operation with proper shutter speed and aperture controls is a non-negotiable necessity, and I don't need a built-in meter as I prefer Sunny 16 or incident metering.

The obvious answer is the Olympus XA, and that's a camera that I used happily for most of the nineties and took some of my all-time favourite shots with. But my hands aren't as supple as they used to be, and nowadays the XA's controls are a bit too fiddly for me to use easily. Plus they go for stupid prices these days. (Edit: I've just remembered that the XA was aperture priority rather than fully manual So why do I remember it as fully manual? Must be encroaching senility, and in my defence I haven't used an XA since last century.):lol:

There's a part of me that likes the idea of one of the cheap Leica LTM copies like a Zorki with a decent lens attached (an actual Leica is out of my price range). Does anyone have any experience with one of those?

I'd settle for a 40mm lens if the price was right, but 50mm is a length that just doesn't suit me and 35mm has always been my ideal.

Thanks for any suggestions anyone's got, ideally not above the 150 mark.:)
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