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Forum: Photographic Technique 5 Days Ago  
Landscape Hyperfocal / landscape focus advices are wrong
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 38
Views: 1,438
Should you really need or wish to use a DoF calculator there are two that I can recommend:

Lumariver DoF (Android and iOS) - Has many customisation settings including airy disk and or pixel pitch and of course CoC. Anders Torger also has an excellent profile designer
Lumariver Depth of Field Calculator
And
True DoF. iOS only
Intro to TrueDoF-Pro

Then there is Harold Merklingers method not using hyperfocal
DoF Merklinger
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-27-2019, 01:57 AM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
This paper is not silver photo paper C type it is for inkjet printers.
No point comparing back of print the Baryta coating only on one surface.

The best advice I can offer you at this time is to do a little more study of colour management if you are keen to match print to screen. You could do worse than read one of these

https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-Color-Management-Bruce-Fraser/dp/0201773406/r...gateway&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Color-Management-Photographers-Techniques-Photoshop...gateway&sr=8-2
Forum: Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 05-26-2019, 10:26 AM  
Canon Removing Universal Hot Shoe Pin? No 3rd Party Flash Compatablity?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 2
Views: 387
The ‘removal’ of the pin seems strange as that pin is the trigger pin on every flash I have come across. The other pins function as Quench, Ready, ETTL and AF assist.

https://i.stack.imgur.com/6zha4.png

Anyway only a matter of time until someone posts an adaption or third parties introduce their own
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-26-2019, 04:01 AM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
So you have effectively given up on colour management in its real sense. You sent them an sRGB and handed over to them the task of managing your data to make what to them would be a nice print. There is no way that they could possibly see what you see on your monitor that would represent your edits through their profile. The only way to get close is for you to make your edit using soft proofing through the ICC profile for the printer and hope that their colour management up to the task.

You cannot correct for paper base white differences. Paper white is just that the white of the paper and this may take on bluish or warmer casts. If a paper has OBA's then it is likely to appear more blueish than a non OBA paper.

What process, papers and equipment did each lab use? Were they the same?


The good thing for you is that you have at least identified where not to send for prints


---------- Post added 26-05-19 at 12:35 ----------


And what standards did you settle on for:

White Point ?

Black Level ?

Gamma ?

Luminence ?

---------- Post added 26-05-19 at 12:39 ----------

You cannot correct paper white it is fixed and no printer other than specialist uses white ink
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-26-2019, 12:32 AM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
You have already made errors in the way you think the print process works and PPI vs DPI and I am afraid you are also making errors with the following assumptions. However I will try but it is going to be difficult as you are not actually in control of the process passing to certain labs

Providing ICC profiles is only the start, they need to actually encourage you to use and embedd the profile in your edited image where you will also have chosen a rendering intent. Did they tell you to do this or just ask you to supply an sRGB JPEG?

No surprises there then as they probably do not follow colour management practices preferring instead to send 'acceptable' prints






QuoteQuote:

- For the two companies that provide ICC profiles, only one inkjet print is close to what the ICC soft proofing give to my display (my display is calibration over 4 hours, 100% matching of sRGB volume), the inkjet print from the other company contains a magenta tone. I've filed a customer complain sent them a shot with a gray card in front of the print to show the difference, but they didn't care much, they offered me a voucher for ordering more prints.(more B&W print with the same tone shift? laughs... I get the customer support lady did not understand my concern).



Display calibration of over 4 hours makes zero sense. Display calibration should not take long at all once you have set your required display standards. You monitor may be capable of displaying the full sRGB gamut however you do not calibrate to sRGB you calibrate to standards e.g. White Point (D65), Black Level, Gamma and luminence. The latter based on your ambient light and print viewing conditions including correct illumination of the print.
As a matter of interest what standard values are you using?
What is your ambient editing environment like, consistent, variable, dull, bright?
When viewing print next to monitor, how are you illuminating the print?






QuoteQuote:

- The third company using silver base print , but provide no ICC profile , give the best B&W print with not tone shift, and their prints are cheaper...



If they were using C type photo paper then AFAIK this is still a colour process requiring equal RGB values to produce a neutral depending on paper substrate colour it should be easy to achieve



---------- Post added 26-05-19 at 06:51 ----------







QuoteQuote:

The problem of soft proofing is that it relies on monitor calibration and viewer appreciation, which is very subjective. I've found another way to evaluate prints, using my camera with WB calibration on X rite gray card, and shooting an 18% gray print under the same light at the same moment, the histogram clearly show the tone shift but is it not possible to fully correct for it with inkjet if the tone shift come from the paper because ink will only correct the color in areas of prints where there is a lot of ink... That's why I wrote that the silver process is better.



There is nothing subjective about soft proofing if your colour management is working quite simply soft proofing works, unfortunately yours at least from what you say is broken

---------- Post added 26-05-19 at 06:58 ----------


Inkjet prints can exceed areas of Adobe RGB
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-25-2019, 02:34 PM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
Sorry but the very purpose of ICC profiles IS to accurately describe a printer, ink and paper combination. A good profile will do this and give you a very good print to screen match in a properly colour managed system using soft proofing. This includes evaluation of the print under proper conditions of illumination - many miss this important step.

Initial print illumination for evaluation is probably best using Soloux 4700k or similar, however if you know the exact end viewing conditions you can mimic this
during print run.

There really should be no issue printing C type or inkjet in B&W, these are colour materials.

The biggest problem most face in trying to match screen to print is that they are not printing themselves and many labs pay lip service to colour management. A good lab will supply an ICC profile and also allow you to soft proof and embedded the paper profile and importantly select the rendering intent in you data file
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-25-2019, 07:51 AM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
Viewed in isolation either high gloss or matt print should look good for many subjects - just don't try to compare them side to side. As you have already identified glossy finish paper usually offers a greater Dmax and can appear to resolve more detail than a matt surface. My preference tends to be for semi gloss, lustre finishes as viewing angles and lighting not quite as critical as high gloss


If your lab offers icc profiles for its range of papers then you may get some idea of the contrast loss by soft proofing if you own a suitable application (PS or LR)
Forum: General Photography 05-23-2019, 03:32 AM  
This Airport Made Fence Holes for Planespotting Photographers
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 16
Views: 974
What a helpful idea. They may need to rethink the hole size for some of you though :D

https://i1.wp.com/pixelpluck.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/sigma-200-500mm-lens.jpg

Our nearest airport is Manchester and they do have viewing areas but AFAIK not made any holes, yet! I do not envy the people that live in the houses at the end of one runway. Aircraft seem to be so low on landing passing the rooftops by an insane distance then crossing the road just before the runway end. Should imagine that there would also be a good deal of noise from aircraft positioned for take of on the same runway.
https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/incoming/gallery/worlds-biggest-pass...ne-a380-781980
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-23-2019, 02:04 AM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
Thanks for the confirmation which now suggests the image chosen as a 'correct' exposure is actually two stops from clipping the red channel. So effectively losing 2 stops of DR !
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-22-2019, 12:12 PM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
Just a quickie to show an image of a very red jumper capture 645z deliberately over exposed showing clipping in Rawdigger of the red channel only.

Looked worse on initial import into ACR due to Adobe applied adjustments but red channel still clipped. Fairly straightforward correction to pull back to look the same as the more conservative 'correct' exposure. The ACR colour represents the jumper colour fairly accurately on a wide gamut monitor and can be reproduced closely on some colour print materials

More severe clipping may be recoverable with some work in PS. Just to be absolutely clear I AM NOT advocating exposing to clipping point on the contrary get it right in camera has got to be the best advice.
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-22-2019, 06:35 AM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
That is clear and you also seem to want to move the goalpost. My image not corrected but showing that you do not have clipping or full saturation in LR and confirmed in Rawdigger. Your posted 'corrected' images bear no resemblence to your original screenshot and in the process of editing you have lost the yellow/gold thread next to the dark blue, this may or may not be intentional!

This is not as much about image colour as approaching saturation/ clipping and yet you still choose to ignore the evidence in Rawdigger as it contradicts you theories. Presenting as proof your image file in DCPU is flawed as you are still not getting it - you are not looking at the raw data you are looking at a rendering of that data in DCPU and in this case the rendering chosen favours the look of clipping and yet I bet that if you actually edit the image that you will see that the red channel has not hit a wall

I did say that:This is purely an editing issue but with a full unclipped file should not present any problems

Below first is your orignal image in your editor with your newly edited version below. You have made a huge change to the reds, but that is your perogative!
Second image is a quick edit in ACR not wasting any time trying to match your edit in any way but showing again that there is no clipping.
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-22-2019, 12:59 AM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
Just the one image that you claim overexposed (assume by this you mean from the metered reading?). From what you said about your method of placing red value to the right in camera histogram (you are increasing exposure) then subsequently you are increasing exposure by +0.3EV your value of +2EV is probably actually close to +3EV as shown below


Shows zero signs of clipping either in Rawdigger of ACR - I have never seen clipping without an associated histogram climbing the wall. See attachment of a view of your raw data for this image. You may also note that the red value is nearly at +3EV and you may also wish to check back what I said about taking a meter reading of a specific area and increasing the suggested exposure by +3EV which may get you very close to saturation - this represents a meter calibration point of 12.5% which may be representative of your system, there may be even a little more at a pinch

As already hinted the raw editor application of profile can make a huge difference to how the render appears and this will be reflected in the histogram. The attached gif once again showing no clipping even with one of the Adobe standard profiles or the Pentax embedded profile in place. Bearing in mind this not taking into account the fact of adjustment by the editor under the hood.

Now should the colour or any other aspect be wrong in your opinion then it should be obvious what you need to do to correct in your application. If not then you may indicate a ROI that must be a particular colour and supply the values for that area. I suggest Lab values as then there is no colour ambiguity when using different working spaces

There is no guessing here. And as you seem to want to be mildly agressive I will reiterate that your testing and conclusion appear to be flawed.

Including this nonsense which does not deserve an answer.
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-21-2019, 11:43 PM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
Have you examined the posted images? If so apart from normalising The rendering what exactly needs recovering

---------- Post added 05-22-19 at 12:36 AM ----------

That is indeed a theoretical value and not all cameras will reach it may only get to 16000 or so. But unless the Pentax is a special case scenario once saturation point hit I have never seen a case yet where the data does not hit the wall and climb in one of several shapes. If this is the case for Pentax so be it and I stand corrected, my 645z does not exhibit the behaviour of a gentle tail off when saturated the wall is there.

I was under the impression that you actually intended to post an image with full well saturation?
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-21-2019, 03:27 PM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
Well I am going to turn in now but suggest you check your testing methodology as it seems quite flawed from the very first post.

There is no red stuck at full saturation in your images and there is no sign of hitting the brick wall that is clipping. In short there is nothing that is outside of recovery
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-21-2019, 02:12 PM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
GUB, thank you for the images.

Only had time for a cursory glance but you do seem to be on another planet there is no red clipping even in the lightest image it is well under clipping point examining in RawDigger and LR. In any digital capture there are a finite number of levels, for your K1 the numerical value for saturation is 16383 for the RGBG channels. The value for your lightest image for red channel in the mid 15000’s so not reached full well capacity. Obviously all other channels well below saturation.

There is a difference in WB and an obvious hue shift but not what you so far have described and all very easily corrected to match. Please send me a clipped one :D

I will check properly tomorrow
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-21-2019, 11:29 AM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
😄 I am not surprised that you are not surprised about grey card reading with modern DSLR’s 😉. They have their place perhaps under certain special circumstances and in ‘their day’ served as a useful central pivot point in a 10 stop analogue B&W world, with the caveat that 18% needed correction to 12.5% by +1/2 stop. Shooting reversal film I never found a grey card of particular use although I did use palm of hand to meter off and increase exposure accordingly to prevent blown highlights.

I would not want to be too prescriptive about ‘proper’experimental conditions but there are limits as I know that you know. I think inadvertently this post has actually proved a point I was trying to make ( labour !) 😩 here and in the other thread - I will wait for further reply rather than expand now.

A comment was made about no recovery from clipping a channel and this to a large degree is correct, but only if the channel truly clipped and that confirmation can only be had in a program that reads the values in the RGBG channels without applying correction.

A further suggestion that recovery not possible from a clipped channel. This may also be the case but is far from the rule in my experience if photo restorations.

To answer your question directly, a raw with a full saturation of reds would be interesting as would one showing definite clipping in any channel. No promises of miracles of course 😉😁
Forum: Photographic Technique 05-21-2019, 05:02 AM  
Undies,Histograms,Reds,and Clipping.
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 26
Views: 2,274
The meter cannot see anything other than luminance values. Spot metering will be the most accurate/consistent method of reading luminance values. It may or may not be more/less sensitive to certain colours

Meters are not calibrated to 18% they never have been since standards introduced. Average calibration point will be around -3EV from sensel saturation = 12.5%. Try it yourself meter something with texture and from the indicated exposure make several more increasing 1/3 stop each time until you are at least +3.67 EV from meter reading. If meter is 12.5% you will have hit saturation at +3EV, if meter calibration is 18% then you will only have +2.47EV to saturation.
Important to note you will not see accurate clipping response in any (AFAIK) raw editor due to the way images are rendered as covered in a previous post. Adobe add BLE and also add exposure, contrast and black level over their previous standards. Others may differ! You will need ot examine your file with Rawdigger or similar to get a proper indication of clipping

The colour sensitivity of the meter may be less than even across all colours but it is the lack of red and blue sensels (1/2 that of green) that really make a difference and is one of the winning points with pixel shift systems.

With respect your conclusions appear to be founded on several misunderstandings:

1. That camera exposure meters calibrated to 18%. Generally this is not the case with 12% being more normal. The difference representing 0.5EV i.e. meter a so called 18% grey card and for a 'normal' subject you will need to increase the indicated exposure by +0.5EV or angle the card so that it is 45 degrees to the light - same effect.

2. 18% grey is actually the middle grey of exposure and should be close to RGB values of 128. There is no colour editing space in common use where 128 represents a mid point. Use L*a*b* to get a measure of mid tone set 50,0,0 and you will find that values change for instance I usually work in Prophoto with raw files and middle grey is about RGB =100, Adobe RGB is RGB=118 and sRGB close enough

3. Not familiar with your raw editor but there is no information about what it adds to raw to first render and image but one thing is certain it does not provide you with a real view of your raw data just its rendering and resulting histogram

4. You cannot rely on the EV controls in a raw converter to mimic what happens with exposure changes in camera. Your camera is an analogue capture device with an A/D converter turning photon count into digital numbers in a linear space. Your raw editor must apply a number of adjustments including, demosaicing, finding white and black points, finding a decent White balance, and importantly apply a gamma curve. When you apply exposure correction in your raw editor you are applying through a TRC (gamma curve) which will roll of highlights and shadows very differently from your original capture.

5. Clipping in JPEG? If you have not clipped in raw then your conversion to JPEG shows clipping then that is an error in your editing. Perhaps I have misunderstood the relevance of mentioning JPEG as the discussion really is raw capture

You may or may not be correct that your cameras meter is a little hot but I would expect that you will get similar if you care to shoot a bright blue subject.

In the other thread I asked if anyone was prepared to actually post a link (dropbox maybe) of red problem for us to look at the actual data - that offer is still open :)
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-21-2019, 01:22 AM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
Are you suggesting this image clipped?
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-20-2019, 11:31 AM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
Masking and channel chops works very well but is not infallible and of course cannot be accomplished in a raw editor without the ability to mask and play with channels individually.

This thread has only become complex due to specific questions raised and not getting any answers therefore responses may have been too generalised

I think that anyone viewing this thread outside of Pentax fold may get the impression that there is a fundamental issue with Pentax and reds - I do not think that this is the case but....

As yet I have not seen any signs of overexposure in any posts here (to the point of clipping) on the contrary I have seen some very nice red images (my subjective view of course) without issue (but no indication of exposure)

I have seen comment on reds too red, but that is entirely subjective and rather difficult to judge as there is no indication of how the reds are being viewed e.g. raw editor, editor camera profile, on monitor or print, sRGB or Adobe RGB coverage of monitor and print gamut, calibration state of monitor, or print and what the print settings are, paper type, profile etc.

Entirely possible that you will see clipping indicator on monitor where it will not be on print so view the soft proof with a good paper profile

I have also seen comments about red channel being truly clipped and while I agree recovery may not be possible but as yet no one has offered a raw image to demonstrate the problem and open up avenue to others to explore to see if it can be solved - any one game enough to post a problematical raw?
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-20-2019, 05:14 AM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
It is possible that lowering the red primary saturation or even hue will not necessarily open a colour cast in the rest of the image as it is primarily 'correcting' an over enthusiastic interpretation of red which may include areas outside of the ROI, albeit much less affected.
My preference however would be to go directly to the HSL/Colour tab in ACR and LR where you can individually adjust all parameters for Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Aqua, Blue, Purple and Magenta. Using this method appears to limit the affect to just the selected colour without too much change to other areas globally. You can even use this method in PS with the advantage of being able to mask precisely where you need to apply changes


While we should all endeavour to get it right in camera, which means expose so no clipping and applying the correct profile that may 'tame' certain colours that need it, we have to accept that sometimes we may miss an unrepeatable shot. But we should not necessarily give up as it is sometimes possible to recover an image that is clipped in one channel by applying some post work in an image editor (not a raw converter). If there are at least two good channels of information then even a raw converter can do quite a lot, however there is a limit. An application like PS may be able to combine/refine/repair channels that are clipped with a little work

For example and I hope the OP does not mind taking his red flower image (not overexposed imo) even though JPEG the reds can be tamed to allow some detail to be brought back - just an interpretation and proof of concept rather than a good example
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-20-2019, 04:53 AM  
K1 in print test
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,418
The comparison is still valid, just different method and media using the same principles of PPI and DPI

Cost of printing differences may well be much lower (depends on the skill and service level of the lab!)

There is no particular reason for any printer to follow 300 - 360 PPI as input resolution (other than it is close to calculated visual acuity figures (20/20 vision) for seeing a contone image from dots)

The point is that for a specific file its native pixel count will allow you to print at a maximum certain size depending on printer and prior to any interpolation. So for a 6000x4000 ppi image resolution for different printers you will get a different maximum print size:

300 PPI printer e.g. Canon/HP = 20" x 13.3"
360 PPI printer Epson = 16.6" x 11.11"
400 PPI Durst Lambda (C Type) = 15" x 10"

Now of course we may require a print much larger or smaller than the max sizes quoted. In that case up or down sampling required resuting in lower or higher PPI figures. C Type or inkjet it does not matter as the current native resolution ppi will be up/downsampled to what the printer needs. DPI applied relating to quality settings


If you examine the specifications of C type printers you will find that they quote two resolutions. The first may be called the optimum input resolution 200-300-400 ppi (they may use confusingly dpi). This is the same as inkjet in as much as a particular printer requires a certain amount of pixels per inch to offer the best quality. The second figure is the output resolution as RGB continuous tone and these figures may be over 4000 dpi but quoted as equivalent (compared to inkjet). This is similar to an inkjet printer squirting many dots of different coloured ink to form a particular colour on paper, but in this case it will be shooting coloured light of varying intensity R, G, B to form the colour image of a pixel to the photographic paper.
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-17-2019, 05:55 AM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
Easier maybe and yes experience will count. But if you wish to aim for optimal probably best to investigate a little more to understand what is happening at each stage of workflow.

Bottom line is that most of the time you will get perfectly acceptable images just accepting what the meter and the raw editor shows you. But be aware that you are not seeing the truth just someone elses interpretation rendering your raw data to look good, just the same as the camera manufacturers comittee have decided how raw images should be rendered and the variations they may offer in camera presets.

An example already posted of an underexposed image of how it looked OK in the raw editor (and similar on camera screen). Truth is that this image under exposed probably around -2 2/3 EV compared to an optimally exposed image and losing nearly 3 stops DR and an increase in noise characteristic. In this case I could not care less but in other circumstances it may have helped to understand and attempt to get things right in camera

1. JPEG in camera settings obviously affect JPEG only but include the look and histogram seen on the camera LCD - maybe helpful or not as once you observe clipping then you have more headroom in the raw data, probably over +1EV.

2. If you are using your camera histogram to try and see close to raw you could use UniWB (if you can stomach the green look) or set the lowest contrast an most neutral picture settings for JPEG to get closer to clipping point

3. Find out your own camera clipping point for metering with some practical tests. Spot metering being easiest. Spot read an area containing texture and make a series of exposures based 0.3EV apart. As it is likely your meter calibrated around 12.5% (about +3EV from sensor saturation) you may want ot start at +2 1/3EV and increase up to +3 2/3 EV. Once you have found the point of saturation in the field (assume you found +3EV) you will know when you meter a specific ROI then you can apply up to +3EV without clipping and still retain texture. Now in the unlikely event that your camera meter is calibrated to 18% the theoretical point of saturation will be +2.47EV from meter suggestion (spot or possibly centre weighted are the best candidates for this)

4. You will not see a raw histogram in most image editors. So unless you evaluate using similar to RawDIgger or change your editors processing to mimic as shown above your really do not know what your data represents, other than in most cases and adjustment to make a pleasing first rendition that will need further editing to taste.
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-17-2019, 03:44 AM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
If your really want to override the highlight headroom and other raw editor additions BLE is only a starting point. Adobe process versions have changed over time to accomodate what Adobe feels represents an 'good/acceptable starting point'

A -0.5 BLE value to exposure (note this value may change with ISO) is not enough to give you a clear picture of what Adobe have changed in process versions. To look at the data closer to what was added you will need to make changes to the tonal curve and adjust Exposure to -1.0 + BLE, i.e. new Exposure slider value will be -1.50. WIth Contrast and Black sliders adjusted to -33, +25 respectively.

These adjustment figures will bring you closer to what would be seen in RawDigger and some other raw editors such as RawTherapee. The image below I think illustrates the 'problem' quite clearly. Initial capture relying on the cameras matrix metering, reveals an OK exposure in ACR with indications of more exposure headroom. Wait for the image change to reveal BLE compensation and exposure, contrast and black level nulling from previous versions and we have a totally different story a pretty much underexposed image IMO. Please forgive the banding that has been caused by dropping image straight to GIF

All editors must add their own interpretation of raw data as you really would not like what you see viewing actual raw data i.e. a flat and dark image prior to rendering to what someone deems as acceptable. An example of raw data dump up to demosaicing. Someone has to apply a rendering to this to get an acceptable looking starting point. Unless there a specific needsf or data to be shown in a certain way then rendering interpretations will look different between editors and other subjective views.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/attachments/6-pentax-dslr-discussion/439...awdataview.jpg
Forum: Pentax DSLR Discussion 05-16-2019, 12:31 PM  
How red is your red ?
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 84
Views: 3,917
Question to Lotech
Your last response 6 days ago. Are you any clearer on your red issues?

As you know I suspect that your issue is not clipped reds (likely I think processing) but if you think it is AND you are capturing raw then why not post a download link so we can take a look
Forum: Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 05-15-2019, 03:30 PM  
LR Lens Correction Profiles FF vs Crop
Posted By TonyW
Replies: 11
Views: 512
You could edit the file to display that or any name but there is little point as the lens design is for crop.

Just for fun!, here is a Nikon FF capture with 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor, selecting your Pentax 20-40. By no means horrible (lens profile that is not image content :lol:), apart from small, incorrect, but not objectionable distortion correction, it lightens the corners correcting for vignetting that is not actually there.
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