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Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4 Review RSS Feed

Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4

Sharpness 
 9.0
Aberrations 
 8.0
Bokeh 
 7.3
Handling 
 6.7
Value 
 8.3
Reviews Views Date of last review
6 22,195 Wed March 5, 2014
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Recommended By Average Price Average User Rating
100% of reviewers $140.00 8.17
Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4

Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4
supersize
Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4
supersize
Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4

Description:
This lens is designed to be used exclusively with the macro bellows as it has no focusing mechanism of its own. The lens came in two versions witch were optically identical except for the lens coating: the latest version of the lens received multi-coating.

The lens was reissued in K-mount.

First version (see photo to the left):
Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Preset, 8 blades
Optics
5 elements, 3 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Plain
Max. Aperture
F4
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
Max. Magnification
Filter Size
49 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 16 ° / 14 °
Full frame: 24 ° / 20 °
Hood
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
54.5 x 36 mm
Weight
139 g
Production Years
1964 to 1971
Engraved Name
Bellows-Takumar 1:4/100
Product Code
360, 43600
Notes
The lens is for use with a bellows unit and has therefore no focusing ring.
Variants

1: Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4
2: Super-Multi-Coated Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4



Second version (see second photo):
Super-Multi-Coated Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Preset, 8 blades
Optics
5 elements, 3 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Plain
Max. Aperture
F4
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
Max. Magnification
Filter Size
49 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 16 ° / 14 °
Full frame: 24 ° / 20 °
Hood
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
54.5 x 36 mm
Weight
139 g
Production Years
1971 (start of production)
Engraved Name
Super-Multi-Coated BELLOWS-TAKUMAR 1:4/100
Product Code
43601
Notes
The lens is for use with a bellows unit and has therefore no focusing ring.
Variants

1: Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4
2: Super-Multi-Coated Bellows-Takumar 100mm F4

Features:
Manual FocusAperture RingFull-Frame SupportAdapter needed for DSLRsDiscontinued
Price History:



Add Review of Bellows-Takumar/Super-Multi-Coated Bellows Takumar 100mm F4
Author:
Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-6 of 6
Loyal Site Supportaxian

Registered: September, 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 417
Lens Review Date: March 5, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 6 

 
Pros: Sharp
Cons: Aperture blades are far from round, can be a hassle to use.
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 7    Bokeh: 4    Handling: 5    Value: 5    Camera Used: Multiple Canon EOS   

The biggest positive of this lens (in combination with a bellows) is the ability to focus from infinity to beyond 1:1 without changing your setup. Want to walk around a nature preserve and take a super close up of a flower followed by a shot of a far-off bird without switching any gear? This is a good combo for you. The second best attribute is that it's quite sharp.

Tip: Put the Asahi Pentax Variable Close-Up Ring and Extension Tube #2 on back of this and you've instantly got a lens that can infinity focus without all the bulk of a bellows.

Another reviewer mentioned that the aperture blades on this give nice stars (the star spikes peak around f7-10). If you want stars, great! Since this primary purpose of this lens is macro, and I usually don't want stars in my macros, this is a negative for me. If I want to induce stars, I prefer to stick an aperture mask on the front of a lens so I can precisely control the effect. It's all a matter of taste though, and some people will love it. Even though they have the same optical formula, I can definitely say you will get more bokeh 'flavor' with the Takumar-Bellows when compared with the S-M-C 4/100.

If you want a smaller, more convenient setup you might consider the S-M-C 100mm f/4 macro instead. I find it more practical, and if you need more than 1:2, you can always pop extension tubes on the back.
   
Pentaxian

Registered: July, 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,085
Lens Review Date: May 5, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 9 

 
Pros:
Cons:
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 7    Value: 10   

I used mine extensively on my spotmatic F. I used it as a short telephoto as well as macro. I was able to balance everything including a Rollie hammer head flash, focus and use the ring to stop down to the required aperture. My motivation was to outdo everyone else with their expensive nikon gear and hasselbads with their wildlife photos. The later was easy than you might expect because they had real trouble with the back ground composition.

Over the years I have taken some great shots, but my eyes are becoming dimmer and I depend heavily on autofocus. I still pull the lens and bellows out to do macro work. For some reason it seems a lot brighter in the viewfinder than my old takamar F5 50mm macro.

The lens and bellows is a lot of fun if you can get hands on them. I had a t mount that seemed to easily fit on the bellows.

Do not use the pentax m42 adaptor. It locks onto the camera and you won't be able to screw off the bellows.
   
New Member

Registered: December, 2012
Location: orbost victoria
Posts: 24
Lens Review Date: January 16, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: very sharp
Cons: slow to use
Sharpness: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: k7   

I know that using a bellows unit may be a bit a slow process, but as a studio tool in photography its priceless,
But for outdoor or hand held photography I think a Macro lens of the Pentax kind would be easier and just as sharp.
   
Senior Member

Registered: July, 2010
Location: Clermont-Ferrand, France
Posts: 221
Lens Review Date: May 22, 2011 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $140.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Star shaped blades (bellows), goes at more than 1:1
Cons: Bellow needed

I'm surprised that no one said something about the aperture blades of the Bellows : it gives a nice 8 peaks star that can be useful to obtain a great bokeh. I've used the lens up to something like 5:1 (two bellows + 2 extension rings sets) and it is quite sharp for a such reproduction ratio !
I recommend to use this lens with the Pentax "Bellows unit" : it will go a bit further than infinity, a bit further than 1:1 and it is light enough to use it handheld in macro.
Samples : http://kajiwara.weebly.com/takumar-1004.html
   
Senior Member

Registered: January, 2010
Location: Gothenburg, aka Göteborg
Posts: 211
Lens Review Date: January 14, 2011 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: nice lens
Cons: you need a Pentax bellows!

I bought this in the early 70's, and I got it with the Pentax bellows, and the slide copying addition. Nice lens, fully manual, screw mount! Gave it away, a few years ago, but I don't regret it a bit, as Tamron 90 is so much better, and as good as a macro lens! Plus much simmpler to use, than the Bellows 100!
   
Inactive Account

Registered: March, 2009
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: March 21, 2009 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Sharp, build quality
Cons: Practicality - needs bellows unit or extension tubes

This lens is rather difficult to review. Optically it is a great lens. It's the same as the 100mm f/4 macro. As such it deserves a similar rating.

However, you cannot use it as-is. It needs at least 37mm of extension to focus to infinity (minimum bellows length) and 138mm of extension to get to 1:1 reproduction.

As such you probably won't use it as a walkaround macro.

Now can you fault a Bellows-Takumar for needing a bellows unit?

I'm still not sure, but I've deducted 1 point to reflect this dilemma.

Particularly recommended for your (tabletop) studio work.
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