Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Pentax Lens Review Database » Pentax M42 Screwmount Lenses » M42 Screwmount Wide-Angle Primes
S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5 Review RSS Feed

S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5

Sharpness 
 8.4
Aberrations 
 8.3
Bokeh 
 7.0
Handling 
 9.3
Value 
 9.3
Reviews Views Date of last review
48 277,245 Fri April 27, 2018
spacer
Recommended By Average Price Average User Rating
98% of reviewers $60.08 8.40
S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5

S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5
supersize
S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5
supersize
S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5
supersize
S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5 S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5

Description:
The Super-Takumar came in two models over time with different optics. The first model has a 58 mm filter size with the optical design shown in the leftmost diagram whereas the second model has a 49 mm filter size and the optical design shown in the rightmost diagram. Also, the first model features a slightly differently designed distance scale than the second model.

The final release of this lens was a Super-Multi-Coated model with improved coating but otherwise with the same optics as the second Super-Takumar model.

The two versions of the first model differ as follows: The aperture of the early version goes to F22 whereas the later version bottoms out at F16. The aperture ring of the early version has fine ribs, the later one has coarse ribs.

Pictured to the left is the first Super-Takumar model, early variant; in the center we show the second model of the Super-Takumar; to the right we have the Super-Multi-Coated variant.

Super-Takumar, first model, early version (first picture above and fist lens diagram):
Super-Takumar 28mm F3.5 (model 1 early)
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 5 blades
Optics
7 elements, 6 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Stop-down Pin
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F3.5
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
40 cm
Max. Magnification
0.09x
Filter Size
58 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 55 ° / 46 °
Full frame: 75 ° / 65 °
Hood
Circular push-on with fastening screw
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
60 x 47 mm
Weight
260 g
Production Years
1962 to 1965
Engraved Name
Super-Takumar 1:3.5/28
Product Code
348, 43480
Reviews
User reviews
Notes
First model, early version. Smallest aperture is F22. The aperture ring has fine ribs.
Variants

1: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, fine ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F22 (this lens)
2: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, with coarse ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F16
3: Super-Takumar with 49mm filter ring and new optics formula
4: Super-Multi-Coated with 49mm filter ring and new coating



Super-Takumar, first model, late version (see first lens diagram):
Super-Takumar 28mm F3.5 (model 1 late)
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 5 blades
Optics
7 elements, 6 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Stop-down Pin
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F3.5
Min. Aperture
F16
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
40 cm
Max. Magnification
0.09x
Filter Size
58 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 55 ° / 46 °
Full frame: 75 ° / 65 °
Hood
Circular push-on with fastening screw
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
60 x 47 mm
Weight
260 g
Production Years
1965 to 1966
Engraved Name
Super-Takumar 1:3.5/28
Product Code
43481
Reviews
User reviews
Notes
First model, late version. Smallest aperture is F16. The aperture ring has coarse ribs.
Variants

1: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, fine ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F22
2: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, with coarse ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F16 (this lens)
3: Super-Takumar with 49mm filter ring and new optics formula
4: Super-Multi-Coated with 49mm filter ring and new coating



Super-Takumar, second model (second piccture above and second lens diagram):
Super-Takumar 28mm F3.5 (model 2)
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 5 blades
Optics
7 elements, 7 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Stop-down Pin
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F3.5
Min. Aperture
F16
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
40 cm
Max. Magnification
0.09x
Filter Size
49 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 55 ° / 46 °
Full frame: 75 ° / 65 °
Hood
Rectangular clip-on
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
58 x 41.6 mm
Weight
208 g
Production Years
1966 to 1971
Engraved Name
Super-Takumar 1:3.5/28
Product Code
43871
Reviews
User reviews
Notes
Second model. The filter size was reduced to 49mm comapred to the 58mm of the fist model and the optical design was changed.
Variants

1: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, fine ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F22
2: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, with coarse ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F16
3: Super-Takumar with 49mm filter ring and new optics formula (this lens)
4: Super-Multi-Coated with 49mm filter ring and new coating



Super-Multi-Coated Takumar (third picture above and second lens diagram):
Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 28mm F3.5
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 5 blades
Optics
7 elements, 7 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Stop-down Pin
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F3.5
Min. Aperture
F16
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
40 cm
Max. Magnification
0.09x
Filter Size
49 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 55 ° / 46 °
Full frame: 75 ° / 65 °
Hood
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
58 x 41.5 mm
Weight
212 g
Production Years
1971 (start of production)
Engraved Name
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR 1:3.5/28
Product Code
43872
Reviews
User reviews
Notes
Same optics as the second model of the Super-Takumar.
Variants

1: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, fine ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F22
2: Super-Takumar with 58mm filter ring, with coarse ribs on aperture ring and smallest aperture F16
3: Super-Takumar with 49mm filter ring and new optics formula
4: Super-Multi-Coated with 49mm filter ring and new coating (this lens)

Features:
Manual FocusAperture RingFull-Frame SupportAdapter needed for DSLRsDiscontinued
Price History:



Add Review of S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5
Author:
Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-15 of 48
New Member

Registered: July, 2016
Location: New York, NY.
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: April 27, 2018 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $60.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Lightweight, easy to handle.
Cons: Not so far.
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 6    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Sony Alpha 7 II   

I own the latest version of this lens.
Tested it using a Sony Alpha 7 II.

At 3.5, shooting flat surface (shot and indoor wall) it seems pretty sharp,
For landscape test I shot at 3.5 focusing at the fire escape (out of my window) and it didn't disappoint.
At f/8 (and night shoot) the lights have a nice, crisp and attractive "starry" look. (Photo attached).

   
New Member

Registered: December, 2013
Posts: 24
Lens Review Date: December 19, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $70.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: solid build, small, contrast & sharpness
Cons:
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Spotmatic F   

S-M-C version: I am totally blown away by the CONTRAST this lens creates on my negative film It can even be too much. I've been shooting with SMC Pentax (K) lenses so far, this one Takumar lens is one step up regarding contrast. It is also very sharp. Handling and build are awesome, I love using it. Regarding flare, I have a Hoya UV (0) filter on it and there is no problem. I've not seen any flare whatsoever on my negatives/scans even when shooting towards the sun. Here is what I get with Kodak Tri-X 400, developed very softly in Rodinal 1+150:
   
Site Supporter

Registered: May, 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,372
Lens Review Date: August 13, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $49.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Great colors, well built, small, easy focus
Cons: Slow at f3.5
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 7    Handling: 10    Value: 9    Camera Used: Pentax K-5 IIs   

I was a little hesitant of purchasing this lens because of the variations in the ratings. Some people rated the sharpness as high as 10, while others rated the sharpness as low as 6. In any case I took a chance, for the money it sold for if I got a lemon, it wouldn't be that much of a deal. This is my 3rd Takumar f3.5 series lens, I also own the 35mm and the 24mm. The 35mm is one of my favorite lenses, the 24mm not so much.

The thing I found striking about this lens is the accurate colors it produces. After I take a picture I usually take a quick peak at the LCD playback to see if everything came out OK. With this lens the playback seemed like real life the colors were so accurate. Sure this lens like all Takumars in the f3.5 series tends to over saturate the reds and the greens, but its not over done where the colors become toxic. Actually this saves me a step in post processing since I like the colors to look vibrant in my pictures.

When it comes to sharpness I gave this lens a 8(wish I could give it an 8.5), comparing it against the Takumar 35mm f3.5, the Pentax 35mm f2.8 macro and the 31mm f1.8. The 28mm will just not give you that 3D look that the other lenses will give you, although I only had it for a week and did not get a chance to test it under a variety of situations. However the sharpness is adequate enough and certainly does not deserve the low rating of '6' some users gave it(at least not my copy).

Being that this lens is only a f3.5, trying to squeeze any Bokeh out of it can be pretty challenging. Nevertheless I did not see any harsh, or busy areas in the out of focus backgrounds when using it. Things looked relatively smooth to me. Again I only had this lens for a short time so my experience is limited.

Some people call this an "outdoor lens" because of its limited light gathering capacity, but this lens can also be used indoors if you boost the ISO a little bit, somewhere around 400-800, or you can use flash. The soft corners I read about ? You really have to pixel-peep to find them even wide open, most of the time you wont even notice(at least I didn't).

My copy came in almost mint-like condition, clean glass with a few small scratches on the casing here and there, but no fading of the paint or anything like that... So I can say I'm pretty satisfied for the price I paid for it.

On a cropped camera like my K-5 II this lens gives me the equivalent of a 42mm lens on a FF, which is a little wider than my 35mm and 31mm, great for street photography. I found this lens easier to focus than all my other Takumar's not sure why, but it seems to give you a little bit more leeway as to when the focusing light comes on and off. Also anything past 20 feet will be in focus as compared to 30 feet on my other lenses. This makes it great for landscape photography since you only have to do minimal focusing if any at all.

Point this lens at the sun and that's where the problems begin. I have the Super Multi Coated version, but even then, pointing this lens at the sun will surely affect the contrast and colors in your pictures especially without a lens hood. If I had a choice, I would rate this lens overall at 8.7. Adequate enough, but lacking in character as some of my other more renowned lenses.

What I do like about it is that its easy to focus, it gives me a somewhat wider look than my other 30 somethings, the colors are accurate, it s small and well built as most Takumar lenses are and being a manual lens it is quiet. I don't have to wake up the entire neighborhood when taking a shot.

   
New Member

Registered: February, 2016
Location: Pisz, Poland
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: July 16, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $25.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: sharpness, colors
Cons:
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Samsung NX300   

Fantastic lens, cheap, sharp with excellent colors

Samsung NX300

   
New Member

Registered: December, 2016
Posts: 13
Lens Review Date: February 2, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $70.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Good resolution, colors, contrast, value, build
Cons: "Only" F3.5
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Fuji X-M1, Olympus EPL5   

Bought the latest SMC version of this lens and used it on a old film camera, a Fuji-crop and a M4/3 camera. The lens becomes a normal 42-56mm on these two cameras.

Images look sharp with detail but not artificially sharpened like many modern lenses do. Colors and contrast are very nice, only downturn is the limited bokeh with F3.5, but it still looks nice and creamy.

Some review and image/video sample here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVC20ATaosQ (digital cameras)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8XGOut3IA8 (with Fuji Pro 400H film)

F3.5 - Fuji X-M1



F8 with macro tube extenders - E-PL5
   
Forum Member

Registered: March, 2007
Location: California
Posts: 57

5 users found this helpful
Lens Review Date: January 13, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $60.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Size Build, Reasonably Sharp, Excellent Color, Slight Vignette wide open.
Cons: Now Screw Mount
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: Spotmatic   

This is the most confusing jumble of nonsensical reviews I've ever read. You can't tell which of the four or five lenses people are talking about, they use them on digital cameras and make crazy suppositions, they never say if they scan using auto or take it to the camera store for development, or stick it in Picasa for RAW or Jpeg adjustments. I read most of the post and received nothing for my time.

So I use my Super-Takumar 28mm F3.5 49mm (filter) on my Spotmatic and have for 46 years. The only problem I've ever had with this lens is a sticking aperture on closing. I had it fixed and am still using it. You can read my ratings above.

I love the slight vignette.
   
New Member

Registered: August, 2015
Posts: 6
Lens Review Date: August 13, 2016 I can recommend this lens: No | Price: $100.00 | Rating: 6 

 
Pros: Outstanding mechanical quality
Cons: Soft, not suitable for digital
Sharpness: 6    Aberrations: 7    Bokeh: 7    Handling: 10    Camera Used: Sony A7 and A7r   

I owned the Super-Multi-Coated version. The harsh rating is for use on a modern digital camera (Sony A7 and A7r). I can't speak to how this lens does on film.

Mechanically, this was the nicest lens in my bag. The build quality is outstanding. The ergonomics are incredible. It's a joy to hold. I loved it, and I really wanted it to be a lens I could use. Unfortunately, I had to sell it again because it was just terrible on my camera in comparison to the SMC Pentax K 28mm and the Canon FD 28mm, which I also had.
   
Pentaxian

Registered: December, 2012
Posts: 702
Lens Review Date: February 23, 2016 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $25.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Great colours, quite sharp, contrast
Cons: corner sharpness
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 7    Bokeh: 6    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: K200D, K20D   

I have SMC version. Maybe it is not my most used lens, but I like it - especially the coulours (which seem to be significantly better sooc compared to M28/2.8 lens).
Many people complain about the soft corners and it is true. But if you stop the lens down to f9.5 - f11 it is more then acceptable for me also in the corners. Even if this is a weekness it is still great lens for live view/mirrorless use, I really like its rendering. Anyway it is good for static distant subjects like landscapes or buildings.
Center is quite sharp even wide open.
   
Junior Member

Registered: January, 2016
Location: Warsaw
Posts: 32
Lens Review Date: January 22, 2016 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Compact build, colors.
Cons: (M42?), slow.
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 7    Handling: 7    Value: 8    Camera Used: K-3   

I have a SMC copy. In comparision with Kiron Kino 28mm f/2, Hoya HMC 28mm f/2.8, or SMC-K 28mm f/3.5 - Tak is in medium of scale, clear winner is SMC-K 28mm, last position going to Hoya HMC 28mm. Good for landscapes, or "static" street.

In some situation problems with distortion.

Now I using this lens only with analog with M42.

@3.5

@8
   
Loyal Site Supporter

Registered: March, 2015
Posts: 6,259
Lens Review Date: August 4, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $100.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Build quality
Cons: Slower than some M42 mount competitors; rear face of lens does not cover contacts on camera mount.
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 8    Value: 9    Camera Used: Pentax K-5 with genuine M42/K adapter.   

Bought this lens secondhand near the start of a vacation and it ended up spending a lot longer on the camera than I first intended. The image quality and sharpness are IMO very good when I get the focus correct and supply adequate depth of field. Most failures of sharpness have been failures to focus.

Aperture is not as wide as an M42 lens of this focal length could be, but I think this is probably a deliberate decision made at the design phase. Nevertheless I have rated this as a "con" as it's the only Takumar lens in this focal length and there isn't an f/2.8 variant to give the user choice without going to third parties. Asahi Opt. CO probably realised this, as the deficit was rectified in the K series of lenses.

Build quality is excellent and focus is smooth. Unlike my SMC Tak 55mm f/2.0, this lens has the "classical Takumar" deeply grooved and knurled focus ring and it is a pleasure to use - experience so far is that the focus controls make fine adjustments around the focus point easy, and it doesn't "creep" away from its set point when the ring is released. In addition, the nature of the aperture system means that any "stickiness" or slowness of the blades is irrelevant on a DSLR as they're not racing to close at the moment of the shot (and on an M42 camera, one can always override the automatic stop-down if there's a problem).

One thing that potential buyers should be aware of is that with the lens screwed into the adapter all the way, the base of the lens does not cover the data contacts on a DSLR camera's mounting ring, whereas at least one other M42 lens I own does. Thus, one has to pay particular attention to not exposing the camera to moisture or other potential sources of damage. If you mostly shoot indoors or in mild environments this is probably not an issue, but this isn't a camera/lens combination to risk in inclement weather. If showers are forecast, bring a rain-proof camera bag or leave this lens at home.

Edited to add: I noticed a tendency to underexpose in AV mode (which I always use with the Takumars), specifically at wider apertures and in lower light. One is advised to select a half-stop of EV compensation under these conditions unless the underexposed appearance is specifically sought.

For what it is (M42 mount, requiring adapter, manual focus and manual aperture control), I recommend this lens.
   
New Member

Registered: March, 2015
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 13
Lens Review Date: August 4, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $69.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Small, solid build, good color, resolution and contrast, no distortion
Cons: CA and soft in corners
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 7    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: K-500   

This lens makes good pictures. Distortion is well corrected but the CA and softness in the corners can be noticeable, even pronounced at f3.5 to f5.6. Slight CA is still detectable in the corners at f16 with extreme enlargement. Anyway, it takes pleasing pictures and is built to last forever.

Hand held, 1/100 sec, f11, ISO 1600, using K-500 body.
   
Junior Member

Registered: March, 2014
Location: 48599 Gronau
Posts: 26
Lens Review Date: July 25, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $38.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: great lens, sharp, good contrast and image rendering
Cons: nothing
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10   

Better than I expected! I got the SMC Takumar 35 3.5 and I was surprised by the image quality I could get whith my K 7. Then LBA caught me and I bought the 28 3.5. All the images I got whith this lens I can name in two words: colourfull and contrasty!
Handling is easy and the lens is a fun to use in the field. Very important: you have to use the genuine hood to get the best of the lens!
   
Junior Member

Registered: March, 2015
Posts: 40
Lens Review Date: July 22, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $120.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Build quality - Quality of the image
Cons: none
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: k30   

I have the SMC version (last one) and probably it is very different from the other two versions cause mine is extremely good!
At f3.5 it is not so sharp and edges are not so good. When stop down you will have great result in terms of sharpness.
Reccomanded.
   
New Member

Registered: September, 2011
Location: Rio de Janeiro
Posts: 2

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: June 2, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $200.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Accurate, strong-body, confortable grip handling, small and with the very good performance
Cons: slow at low light
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 6    Handling: 10    Value: 9    Camera Used: K10, K20, K7, EOS   

I Believe miss me a few mechanical Pentax 28mm lenses that I still do not have the opportunity to use. All I could already test or shoot with them, I liked most was this Super-Multi-Coated 28mm f/3.5. Lens with excellent tonal balance, color fast and don't lump together the hues, and wonderful sharpness already at the maximum aperture. It was clearer, will be perfect wide . Because of this, however, isn't very suitable for use on cameras with small / poor viewfinder, or in lowlight where focus precision in first plan is crucial. I have the four versions of this lens mentioned in this article. The first is weak, but, is better in black and white photos, it has dynamic line is very open; the second has amazing colors, like all Super-Takumar Torium and still favoring of the largest filter diameter (58mm) which causes receive more light ; the other two, with filter 49mm, almost equivalent, with better colors in Super-Takumar and better sharpness in Super-Multi-Coated Takumar.
   
New Member

Registered: March, 2012
Location: Berlin
Posts: 6
Lens Review Date: May 3, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $85.00 | Rating: 6 

 
Pros: Takumar build, small
Cons: so so performance
Sharpness: 6    Aberrations: 6    Bokeh: 5    Handling: 10    Value: 8    Camera Used: ESII, MX, 5Diii   

I have owned 3 version of this lens, the early 58mm filter version, and both the Super Tak and S-M-C 49mm versions. I've also owned the 28/2.8 M and A Pentax lenses and they are all reasonable similar - decently sharp in the the center but soft and dark corners, even when stopped down. I think the SMC Takumar has the nicest overall look and feel and the best build quality.

But then there is also the K28/3.5 and that lens is a beast, head and shoulders above the rest...
Add Review of S-M-C/Super Takumar 28mm F3.5



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:47 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top