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SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8

Sharpness 
 9.1
Aberrations 
 9.4
Bokeh 
 9.8
Handling 
 9.4
Value 
 10.0
Reviews Views Date of last review
13 68,929 Wed July 4, 2018
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Recommended By Average Price Average User Rating
100% of reviewers $190.17 9.33
SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8

SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8
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SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8
supersize

Description:
Portrait lens/short tele. Field of view 24 degrees horizontally, which corresponds to a 85mm lens on a 24x36mm camera.
Two versions exist with the same optics, but slightly different cosmetics (see the photos above):

SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution | Check camera compatibility
Image Format
6x7
Lens Mount
Pentax 6x7
Aperture Ring
Yes (no A setting)
Diaphragm
Automatic, 10 blades
Optics
6 elements, 5 groups
Mount Variant
Inner Bayonet
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F2.8
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
160 cm
Max. Magnification
0.13x
Filter Size
67 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)
30 ° / 24 °
Hood
Built-in
Case
S120-150
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Filter Bayonet
Diam x Length
91.5 x 98.5 mm
Weight
835 g
Production Years
1982 to 1989
Notes
Engraved name: smc PENTAX-6x7 1:2.8 165mm
User reviews
Variants

1982: smc PENTAX-6x7 1:2.8 165mm (this lens)
1989: smc PENTAX 67 1:2.8 165mm


SMC Pentax 67 165mm F2.8
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution | Check camera compatibility
Image Format
6x7
Lens Mount
Pentax 6x7
Aperture Ring
Yes (no A setting)
Diaphragm
Automatic, 10 blades
Optics
6 elements, 5 groups
Mount Variant
Inner Bayonet
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F2.8
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
160 cm
Max. Magnification
0.13x
Filter Size
67 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)
30 ° / 24 °
Hood
Built-in
Case
S120-150
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Filter Bayonet
Diam x Length
91.5 x 98.5 mm
Weight
835 g
Production Years
1989 (start of production)
Notes
Engraved name: smc PENTAX 67 1:2.8 165mm
User reviews
Optics unchanged from PENTAX 6x7 series variant
Variants

1982: smc PENTAX-6x7 1:2.8 165mm
1989: smc PENTAX 67 1:2.8 165mm (this lens)

Features:
Manual FocusAperture RingMedium-Format SupportAdapter needed for DSLRsDiscontinued
Price History:



Add Review of SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8
Author:
Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-13 of 13
Site Supporter

Registered: July, 2017
Location: Cinco de Mayo
Posts: 190
Lens Review Date: July 4, 2018 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $210.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Excellent for Face close up pics
Cons:
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: K-3ii   

This review is for APSC camera.


I find it a very useful lens for face close-up photographs.

In APSC this lens has effectively 165mm focal length, which I like because I keep the distance with the subjects. But I suppose it will not be very convenient if communication with the models is required.

The Bokeh is persistent in all openings avoiding the pentagons at background.

After the 105mm f2.4, this is my lens is my favorite for photographing faces.



   
New Member

Registered: October, 2016
Posts: 7
Lens Review Date: January 30, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: lens speed, 10 blade aperture, built-in hood
Cons: weight
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax 67   

This is just a great lens! It has many advantages that you will never get in any other medium format lenses:
1) It is fastest portrait lens for a such medium format frame size. There is other faster primes but they are all intended for a smaller frame size.
2) 10 blade aperture. It helps to gentle blur background for smoother bokeh
3) Built-in hood
4) 67mm filter thread which is more common that 77mm.

It has only one negative side -- its weight too much for me. Anyway highly recommend!

Read my full lens review with bokeh samples at http://skrasnov.com/pentax-67/165mm-f28/
   
New Member

Registered: November, 2014
Posts: 13
Lens Review Date: October 4, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $80.00 | Rating: N/A 

 
Pros: Excellent IQ
Cons:
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax 67   

I used this lens (almost) exclusively on my uncle's old Pentax 67 camera for a couple weeks. I can't give an accurate value estimate because he bought the system + three lenses for a couple hundred dollars second-hand.

Positives:
-really standout IQ
-surprisingly light for such a long lens

Negatives:
-"Auto" switch easily slides back to manual mode and needs to be re-cocked. This took a while to get used to, as when it's on manual the built-in light meter doesn't work.

Of the lenses in his kit this was by far my favorite to shoot with. It's an awesome focal length on medium format, and the aspect ratio fits the field of vision really well. It's also worth noting that it's not the easiest lens ever to focus. I realize this is mainly a fault of the Pentax 67, but if you're shooting at f/2.8 focus is very hard to nail. Despite that I think it's an amazing lens and I would highly recommend it.

   
Inactive Account

Registered: January, 2015
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: August 22, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $200.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: It's sharp at f/2.8, beautiful bokeh! Contrasty!
Cons: minimum focus
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax 67   

It's a quite sharp at f/2.8 and very beautiful Bokeh just like the 105mm! lens don't have any CA too! Great lens to have in your Pentax 67 system!
but is one heavy lens!
   
Inactive Account

Registered: March, 2015
Posts: 6
Lens Review Date: March 8, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 10 

 
Pros:
Cons:
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: 67II   

This is a wonderful lens! Personally I use it on the 67II for travel portraits. The bokeh out of this lens wide open is extremely smooth and pleasant, and coupled with the color rendering of Portra 160 gives memorable portraits. Outstanding, and for my uses the only P67 lens that I will never part with.
   
Site Supporter

Registered: October, 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 6,338

4 users found this helpful
Lens Review Date: May 8, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $155.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Fast, built-in hood, excellent optics.
Cons: Minimum aperture of only f22.
Camera Used: 6x7, 67 and 67II   

The 6x7 165/2.8 was released in 1982 as a replacemnt for the old 6x7 150/2.8 lens. I have the second and last 1989 version (67 165/2.8) and it has the same optics as its predecessor.

Usage:
The 67 165/2.8 is my third lens in the 150mm to 165mm focal range and it’s on par with these other two great lenses, the 6x7 Takumar 150/2.8 and the 67 165/4 LS.

Here’s a quick summary of the 67 165/2.8 against the other two lenses.

67 165/2.8 vs 6x7 150/2.8: Other than focal length, there is not much difference between these two lenses. The 165/2.8 is slightly bigger/heavier, due to its extra lens element, with a very slight edge in optics. So it comes down to which FL you prefer, they are different enough to have both like with the 75mm & 90mm or 90mm & 105mm. I prefer the 165mm FL for portrait shooting, but the 150mm FL is also versatile as almost a long normal/standard lens.

67 165/2.8 vs 67 165/4 LS: These two lenses are completely different. The 165/4 LS is shorter, weighs less, and has a 77mm filter thread. The 165/4 LS is also slower, but has a better minimum aperture of f/32 than the f/22 of the 165/2.8. Optically I prefer the 165/4 LS over the 165/2.8, but again they are very close. After using these two lenses together for awhile, I find they are different enough to justify owning both. I like the 165/2.8 better for indoor portrait flash work and outdoor low light/night shooting & close-up work. This is where the 165/2.8’s faster speed helps and makes a brighter viewfinder for critical focusing. The 165/4 LS is preferred for outdoor portrait work, outdoor high-speed flash using the LS and landscape work. This is where the 165/4’s slower speed is not an issue and its f/32 comes in handy for more DOF.

CLOSE-UP WORK: To improve the 165/2.8’s close focusing distance of 1.6 meters, Pentax made two close-up filters that work on the 165/2.8. The 67mm T132 close-up filter gives you magnification up to 0.27x, with a focusing distance of 0.91 to 1.54 meters. The 67mm T226 close-up filter gives you magnification up to 0.21x, with a focusing distance of 1.08 to 2.46 meters

FILTER: The 67 165/2.8 uses 67mm screw in filters, or Pentax 6x7 67mm bayonet filters.

CASE: The 67 165/2.8 comes with the S90-140 soft case.

HOOD: The 67 165/2.8 has a built-in hood that extends.

Summary:
The 67 165/2.8 is another great portrait/short telephoto lens for the Pentax 6x7 system and is highly recommended. I give it a score of 9.5.

Price: I found my 67 165/2.8 at camera swap meet where local store had a booth, they were clearing out some “New Old Stock”. I paid $175.00 CDN for my boxed new lens & case.


Sample shots taken with the 67 165/2.8. Photos are medium resolution Lab scans from original slides or negatives.

Camera: 6x7 Film: Fuji Provia 400X ISO: 400





Camera: 67 Film: Kodak Tri-x 400 ISO: 400

   
Forum Member

Registered: September, 2013
Posts: 52

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: December 18, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $200.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Sharp, Fast, 85mm (135 equivalent), and cheap
Cons: None apparent
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax 67   

I really enjoy shooting with this lens. I admittedly have only put one role through it and have not closely scrutinized the photos -but I'm not the type of guy to peep. The images have come out great with excellent sharpness and contrast. The value of this lens/system is second to none. My other lens in my kit is the 100mm f4. They pair nicely together where the 165 is great for portraits, the 100mm is better for surroundings. I'll be picking up a 45 or 55mm in the future and I think my kit will be complete.



   
Junior Member

Registered: November, 2012
Location: Cosenza
Posts: 42
Lens Review Date: November 11, 2012 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $215.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: sharpness, bokeh, tonality in b/w, contrast
Cons: none
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax 67   

One of the best lens I ever used, period. Stunning for landscape work, sharp and with the best bokeh I've ever seen (on par with the Symmar-S for 18x24cm). Wonderful tonalities when used with black and white films.
   
Junior Member

Registered: May, 2009
Location: S. Ontario
Posts: 30

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: June 20, 2011 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $99.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Great bokeh for portraiture
Cons: None really.

The is a great lens for all round use, and especially portraiture and astro photography when stopped down to f/5.6 for a nice flat field. BTW - I got this lens on the bay - at a ridiculous price. Mint condition.

If you set this lens to the infinity stop, and shoot the lens wide open, or the faster stops, focus will be soft. Testing my lenses with a 300 lpi Ronchi screen in my stiletto focuser for astro use found something interesting. Most every lens, more specifically the Takumar lenses, and especially all the versions of the 165 lens - will focus past infinity.

This was done intentionally I believe by Pentax, as these lenses and the P67 cameras were used extensively for astro photography in previous years, and still are today. Atmospheric conditions and the use of visual filters required additional focus near infinity to keep the stars sharp. The 300 line Ronchi screen is extremely accurate in determining infinity on a star, and I was shocked to find perfect focus was no where near the infinity stop.

Perfect focus was achieved just before the middle of the pinch of the infinity symbol. The Tak 200 and 300 lenses are similar, with perfect focus just inside the middle of the pinch point. If you have a 2x Pentax magnifier, you can visually check this by finding a large contrasty object that is close enough, yet is in focus with the lens stop set against the infinity stop. Use a tripod, and the 2x magnifier, and slowly turn the focus away from the infinity stop on the lens.

You should be able to see the object start to sharpen, and possibly brighten a tad if there is a light on the object and you do this at night. Keep going until you see the object go a bit soft, and then bring the focus back to where it appears sharpest.

Check where the line sits on the infinity symbol. Bet it's not against the stop. The newer versions of these lenses USUALLY are a bit closer to the infinity stop - even my 67 version of the 200 lens. Don't just assume infinity and shoot.

My 400 EDIF lens will go way past infinity. I can easily see this with the 2x magnifier when focusing on a brighter star. The light from the star will actually dim slightly when I go past perfect focus, and the light around the star goes from a nice sharp dot, to a slightly softer and larger dot.

So, back to the 165 lens. It's fast, easier to shoot off hand especially with a faster film. Monopod allows me to even shoot f/8 or more in bright daylight. Shooting portraiture around f/5.6 gives a nice quality to the face and head, and everything just behind the head is nicely softened - bokeh.
   
Giveaway winner!

Registered: December, 2007
Location: beantown
Posts: 944
Lens Review Date: November 21, 2010 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $145.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Handy F2.8
Cons: Random loss of contrast
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 9    Value: 10   

I like this lens. It pulls up shots I thought wouldn't have worked out. I tend to shoot in low light, hand-held, wide-open and sometimes back-lit. Out of a dozen or so times I put this lens on for color shots, I had two images with a degree of loss in contrast due to side lights getting in, but still I got a usable image. In dozens of black & white images it was easy to use with no signs of problems. Kodak Ektar looked good as well as a few rolls of Portra 160NC looked equally good. I think that this is a little more prone to flare issues and the built-in hood is only half adequate. Otherwise... "I like this lens"!
   
Veteran Member

Registered: May, 2008
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 4,180
Lens Review Date: May 1, 2010 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $88.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Wonderful on Crop Sensor
Cons: No complaints

I shoot this lens, coupled to my Tamron 2X MC7 BBAR SP Tele & 67 to K-mount adapter on Pentax CROP SENSOR The results are awesome, with exceptional close-focus @ 5.25 feet along with use of a built in trip-pod mount from the 67 adapter. The picture above is of my lens. Here is a picture of what the lens does on crop sensor @ 330mm:

(Non working link removed)
   
Inactive Account

Registered: September, 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Lens Review Date: March 21, 2010 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $190.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Fast & sharp portrait lens
Cons: duplicate leaf shutter model, minimum focus distance

I bought this lens on ebay to allow me to shoot inside with a portrait lens. Having the 2.8 really helps. I've not notices any softness in fact I thought it was quite sharp. I've read that this along with the 75mm AL lens is among the best offered for 6x7's. I've found no reason to knock that assessment.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bearbaker/4414516057/sizes/o/in/set-72157618039763910/
   
Junior Member

Registered: February, 2007
Location: Okinawa, Japan
Posts: 25
Lens Review Date: March 3, 2007 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $550.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Fast f2.8, solid construction
Cons: slightly soft?

This lens is a standard piece of kit in my camera bag. I often use it for shooting portraits, handheld whereas every other lens is usually tripod mounted.
I dont think this is the sharpest of the 67 lenses, but I don't think this is such an issue for portraits.
A couple of images shot with the lens are

http://www.travel67.com/gallery/traditional_japan/2/

http://www.travel67.com/gallery/okinawa/9/

Chris

www.travel67.com
Add Review of SMC Pentax 67 / SMC Pentax-6x7 165mm F2.8



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