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SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4

Sharpness 
 8.4
Aberrations 
 7.0
Bokeh 
 7.5
Handling 
 7.4
Value 
 8.8
Reviews Views Date of last review
9 47,954 Tue December 31, 2019
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Recommended By Average Price Average User Rating
67% of reviewers $311.71 7.78
SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4

SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4
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SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4
supersize

Description:
A moderate tele lens for the Pentax 6x7 system. This lens came in three variants with the same optical formula

Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution | Check camera compatibility
Image Format
6x7
Lens Mount
Pentax 6x7
Aperture Ring
Yes (no A setting)
Diaphragm
Automatic, 7 blades
Optics
5 elements, 5 groups
Mount Variant
Inner Bayonet
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F4
Min. Aperture
F45
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
500 cm
Max. Magnification
0.07x
Filter Size
82 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)
17 ° / 13.3 °
Hood
Built-in, slide out
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
93 x 186 mm
Weight
1425 g
Production Years
1969 to 1971
Notes
Engraved name: SUPER-TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
User reviews
Variants

1969: SUPER-TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300 (this lens)
1971: Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
1987: smc PENTAX 67 1:4 300mm


Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 6x7 300mm F4
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution | Check camera compatibility
Image Format
6x7
Lens Mount
Pentax 6x7
Aperture Ring
Yes (no A setting)
Diaphragm
Automatic, 7 blades
Optics
5 elements, 5 groups
Mount Variant
Inner Bayonet
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F4
Min. Aperture
F45
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
500 cm
Max. Magnification
0.07x
Filter Size
82 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)
17 ° / 13.3 °
Hood
Built-in, slide out
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Filter Bayonet
Diam x Length
93 x 186 mm
Weight
1425 g
Production Years
1971 to 1987
Notes
Engraved name: Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
User reviews
Variants

1969: SUPER-TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
1971: Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300 (this lens)
1987: smc PENTAX 67 1:4 300mm


SMC Pentax 67 300mm F4
© www.pentaxforums.com, sharable with attribution | Check camera compatibility
Image Format
6x7
Lens Mount
Pentax 6x7
Aperture Ring
Yes (no A setting)
Diaphragm
Automatic, 7 blades
Optics
5 elements, 5 groups
Mount Variant
Inner Bayonet
Check camera compatibility
Max. Aperture
F4
Min. Aperture
F45
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
500 cm
Max. Magnification
0.07x
Filter Size
82 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)
17 ° / 13.3 °
Hood
Built-in, slide out
Case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Filter Bayonet
Diam x Length
93 x 186 mm
Weight
1430 g
Production Years
1987 (start of production)
Notes
Engraved name: smc PENTAX 67 1:4 300mm
User reviews
Variants

1969: SUPER-TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
1971: Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/6x7 1:4/300
1987: smc PENTAX 67 1:4 300mm (this lens)

Features:
Manual FocusAperture RingMedium-Format SupportAdapter needed for DSLRsDiscontinued
Price History:



Add Review of SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4
Author:
Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-9 of 9
Loyal Site Supporter

Registered: September, 2017
Location: Medellín
Posts: 1,206
Lens Review Date: December 31, 2019 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Value, built-in lens hood, sunstars.
Cons: No tripod mount.
Sharpness: 8    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: K-5, 6x7 MLU   

I love this for its seven blade diaphragm. Best used for landscape and sunstars.
   
Pentaxian

Registered: March, 2007
Location: Kokkedal
Posts: 305

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: June 28, 2016 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Low price on the used market, F/45
Cons: No tripod mount, 5m min. focus distance

I find that this lens is better and sharper than its overall rating here seems to indicate (7.29 at the time of writing). It is after all a 1970 vintage film lens. It is quite sharp when proper focus is achieved. It's not a light lens, but I have used it at an airshow on the Pentax 645N with some suprisingly good results. Its biggest negative aspect is the lack of a tripod mount. It may show aberrations, but that is not so much of a problem on a film camera. I haven't tried it on digital.

BTW, all pictures I took that day with the 300mm, were taken handheld. Maybe the Pentax 645N is better dampened than the 6x7, but handheld shooting was not a problem, and neither was focusing.

I don't doubt that the newer 300mm ED [IF] version is a much better lens with easier focusing and a proper tripod mount, but that lens costs nearly ten times more than what I paid for this lens.

Used on a medium-format film camera, it does what it is supposed to do. If you have a future-proof lens on digital in mind, the newer 300mm ED [IF] version is a safer bet.

Eurofighter Typhoon by Lars Holte, on Flickr

Vintage Kramme & Zeuthen KZ II Trainer by Lars Holte, on Flickr

Swedish Airforce Historic Flight; 2x North American Harvard/Texan by Lars Holte, on Flickr

Agusta-Westland EH101, HC3 Merlin by Lars Holte, on Flickr

Handheld shot from the Pentax 6x7 MLU:
Test smc Pentax 67 300mm F4 by Lars Holte, on Flickr
   
Veteran Member

Registered: December, 2008
Location: USA and Europe
Posts: 585

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: April 27, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: sharp wide open, great color, heavy (natural stabilization)
Cons: CA, long close focusing distance
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 6    Bokeh: 6    Handling: 9    Value: 8   

I shoot this lens with the full frame Sony A7R and quite like it. The sharpness and colors are excellent, as most Takumars, it's heavy, which is great for "natural stabilization" as I call it
Great value for only $150 !

Here's a sample photo, taken handheld, wide open.



https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/attachments/12-post-your-photos/266387d14...sc00995-lr.jpg
   
Senior Member

Registered: November, 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 278
Lens Review Date: December 23, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $103.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Image quality
Cons: Bulky, finnicky, CA when wide open
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: K-3, Canon 1000D   

After using this lens handheld I feel that it won't perform its best unless you tripod mount it and use live view to focus. I initially purchased it for astrophotography but found that it was more for wildlife photography as well. The lens is bulky but it has a very professional feel to it. I have no problem with the bulk but I think that this lens would not be suitable for carrying around while attached to the camera.

To get the best out of this lens will require a lot of experimentation with your camera. At first I was disappointed by the CA and what appeared to be a soft image overall. Instead of being discouraged I spent a while tweaking the camera settings and the aperture ring until I got a good image. It will take a bit of experimentation but once you get everything figured out this lens will wow you.

The attached image was taken with my Canon 1000D camera just to show what this lens can do. I will be adding more taken with the K-3 as I figure out the settings which make a pleasing image overall. If you get this lens for the price I did ($103 shipped) then go for it. I wouldn't pay more as I feel there are better 300mm lenses out there if you pay more money.

   
Site Supporter

Registered: October, 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 6,438

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: July 3, 2014 I can recommend this lens: No | Price: $379.00 | Rating: 6 

 
Pros: F/45 minimum aperture.
Cons: Poor design, focal length and minimum focusing distance.
Camera Used: 67, 67 and 67II   

The 300/4 was one of the original lenses when Pentax introduced the 6x7 system in 1969. I have the third and last 1987 version (SMC Pentax 67 300/4) and it has the same optics as its predecessors and the full SMC coatings. The SMC Pentax 67 300/4 was replaced by the SMC Pentax 67 300mm f/4 ED in 1999.


Usage:
The 67 300/4 has three major issues that make it a big disappointment.

- The 67 300/4 weighs 1425g and does not have a tripod support. As a result the lens has vibration issues and produces soft images when using it on a tripod. I find I get better results using this lens handheld (1/250 or higher bracing myself or 1/500 or higher if not) and shooting faster film. (ISO 400 or 800) The Manfrotto 293 telephoto lens support would seem like a quick fix, however it only supports 2.5kg and a 6x7 body, prism & the 300/4 weighs over 3kg, so this option is out.

- Like the other original Pentax 6x7 telephoto lenses the 67 300/4 has a poor minimum focusing distance of 5.0 meters. Pentax made no close-up filter for this lens so you are forced to use extension tubes and suffer the light loss penalty. Using extension tubes make the handling of this lens even worse.

- The redesigned SMC Pentax 67 300mm f/4 ED fixed the above two issues, however Pentax should have gone a step further and also changed the focal length. The 300mm focal length is less than useful, as it’s too long to be much use as a portrait lens and too short to be a decent telephoto. A 265mm f/4 ED lens would have been better and that FL would be similar to the popular 35mm format portrait/telephoto 135mm lens. The only thing I use my 300/4 for is occasional close-ups of larger birds and primarily for shooting small boats near the shore. Note when shooting birds I usually find that I can't get enough reach because the FL is too short, or I have close focusing issues.

The one good thing about the 300/4 is the excellent minimum aperture of f/45, which happens to be better than the f/32 of the 67 300/4 ED. You can get ample DOF with this lens.

REAR CONVERTERS: You can use the older T6-2X and the newer 1.4X & 2X rear converters with the 67 300/4. This will extend the focal length to 420mm or 600mm. As with extension tubes adding a rear converter to the mix makes the 300/4 handling even worse.

FILTER: The 67 300/4 uses 82mm screw in filters, or Pentax 6x7 82mm bayonet filters.

CASE: The 67 300/4 comes with the S110-210 soft case.

HOOD: The 67 300/4 has a built-in hood that extends.

Summary:
If you try really hard you can get a decent shot with this lens, but unfortunately its way too much bother because the focal length is not very useful. As a result I can’t recommend the 67 300/4. If for some reason you like the 300mm focal length then spend the extra money and get the newer 300/4 ED version. Otherwise skip this FL and go with 200mm or 400mm or both. The late model 67 200/4 & 1.4TC will give you a much better lens in the 300mm focal range. I give the 67 300/4 a score of 6.5.

Price: I found my 67 300/4 at KEH and it cost $379.00USD. It was LN- condition and came with the lens case and caps.


Sample shots taken with the 67 300/4. Photos are medium resolution Lab scans from original slides or negatives. (Both shots are handheld.)

Camera: 6x7 Film: Fuji Provia 400X ISO: 400





Camera: 6x7 Film: Kodak Tri-X 400 ISO: 800

   
Giveaway winner!

Registered: December, 2007
Location: beantown
Posts: 944

2 users found this helpful
Lens Review Date: November 21, 2010 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: clears city streets for fear I might launch mortar rounds from it
Cons: like lifting an elephant to my face... with half a trunk.
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 8    Handling: 7    Value: 9   

First of all... Ghees...This is a big-heavy lens... to hand hold!!!
So, secondly, got this lens cheap. Although it gives a little closer reach than my 200 f/4 as well as the effect of the narrow DOF looking nice, you'll have to put this lens on two tripods or beanbag or something to get it to hold still for slow shutter speeds as sort of mention above. When I have extension tubes I can get crazy close, but without it is going to be about 16ish feet as the closest.

So far, I'm not getting the wow yet for this lens. Other lenses will do the same and better. As an example, I found that for closer or portrait range subjects I was better off with a 200mm or 165mm. Running extension is a concern as well due to the greater length and need to steady everything causing concerns for the strength of the pod socket as well as the lens mount strength and vibration concerns when compensations are needed in the exposure for the increase in distance of the glass to film.

So why did I get this? ...Unfortunately...The price. Dirt cheap and the description was that it "...was mounted to a helicopter..." I figured a bargain, however, that kind of use would explained the discovery of infinity being way off. Post adjustments and cleaning, this lens looked to be capable of delivering images again and it did... for a little while. Not ultra sharp as others lenses in my collection and maybe I was expecting too much. The lens was more manageable when braced in a makeshift 'Y' bracket for the long distance tests and while set to f8 and f11 delivered reasonable sharpness. However, to achieve the few shots did require some dancing around and thus the question is... is this all worth it? Honestly, I might lean to the side of NO. I personally would reach for a lighter and shorter lens like my 200mm or if I had the 300mm ED version or go up to 400mm if available or take a walk closer. It is true I've really not explored this lens fully, but the lack of a pod foot and the need to stopdown for optimum sharpness... in the neighborhood of f8 or f11, the heaviness... it all puts the brakes on "fun" potentials for me. Don't let me spoil your fun... this lens is still well regarded in astronomy circles. If you pump iron then all my whining about the heft is just me needing to go to the gym. If you have a helicopter you are even further from my complaints. Just don't over pay for this lens... some out there ask for over 600 or even 899... really! Hey, if I put mine up for sale, I think 250 is more better since it is CLA'd.... actually I'm going to definitely keep it.

UPDATE: Oh, a corrected to the score from 6 to 7 due to the review of the tests images again...corrected score again...8 I may go higher if the test come back good (see below)

12-03-2010 Update: I just discovered that some of the images that were lower in sharpness could be due to a loose lens retainer in the front group. It will vary the focus by 3 to 100 feet depending on distance to subject and depending on how much shaking goes on. So maybe the lens is sharper than it currently seems. I'm going to need a huge spanner to open the front group.

12-23-2010 Update: I have finally pried the lens group open,without damage, and confirmed the loose retainer. The second element was indeed loose and tilted as well as it took two and a half turns on the retainer to secure it. The infinity was way off (Infinity was at about shy of 300 feet). Now the sharpness seems to have improved. I've started retested and will see where this lens is now.

12-24-2010 Update: Not done with film, but the test on the digital does show more even sharpness at the center now, post repair. The CA is noticeable still, but the sharpness is far to good to ignore... wide open. The film will verify how the edges or the remaining 75% of the focus area has improved post repair.

07-18-2011 Update: Stunning image from the Ektar 100.
   
Pentaxian

Registered: February, 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,132
Lens Review Date: March 1, 2009 I can recommend this lens: No | Price: $900.00 | Rating: 7 

 
Pros: Can be sharp when figured out.
Cons: Shutter vib prone, contrast not the best
Sharpness: 7    Aberrations: 5    Handling: 5    Value: 7   

I have owned this lens since 1995, so I have a pretty good idea of its capability.
The 300mm Takumar is the same optically as the 300 Pentax. The Pentax has a rubber grip. The optical design is similar to the 400 Takumar in that it has an APO triplet up front followed by a weak positive element and a negative element in the rear. The design corrects for yellow, blue and red, as one can see uncorrected colors fringe at f/4 in extremely high contrst shots. Color correction improves as one stops down due to differential color correction in the different lens zones(spherochromatism). Even though this lens is technically Apochromatic, it cannot focus the colors in the marginal zone of the lens close enough to the film plane to compete with ED lens performance. This lens is difficult to judge concerning sharpness because it is so prone to shutter vib. It has no tripod collar. I have some shots taken with this lens that are very sharp, especially at infinity and f/8. This lens is not however in the top 10 sharpest lenses of the line. My estimate for lp/mm is 75. Shooting between 1/2 and 1/30 sec is problematic due to shutter vib issues. Using its f/45 stop comes in handy to get the shutter speed in an acceptable range with slow film. Contrast with this lens is one of the worst of the line, so exposure becomes very critical. Using a contrasty film helps this situation. This lens likes Velvia 50. The DOF scale on this lens is the most inaccurate of all the P67 lenses I have used. Use 3 stops more conservative than what is shown. Using inner bay tubes with the 300 is difficult because you have so much overhang off the tripod with little support. This lens does well in portrait work and landscapes. It is well built and tough! When used correctly and with the right film, one cannot tell the difference between this lens and the rest of the P67 lens line.

Overall, not the easiest lens to use but it can be used for published work. I finally sold mine in 2013 after many years of fighting with it and many lost shots. Replaced with the ED version.
   
Site Supporter

Registered: February, 2009
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 328
Lens Review Date: February 20, 2009 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $350.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Super Sharp, close focusing, rubber instead of metal focus ring
Cons: Price (but cheaper now), a bit heavy.

A remarkable lens. Very sharp-my sharpest 67 lens.
   
Senior Member

Registered: February, 2009
Location: SLovakia
Posts: 141
Lens Review Date: February 5, 2009 I can recommend this lens: No | Price: N/A | Rating: 4 

 
Pros: Very good against the sun, perfect build quality, 9 aperture blades
Cons: Not sure about sharpness, heavy, no tripod collar

Am not sure about this lens. To make sharp picture with this lens is serious problem, even with MLU, steady heavy tripod. I hope it is due to missing tripod collar. I will make tests with Singh-Ray variNd filter to take pictures with longer shutter times.

9 aperture blades are perfect, 18 star strokes when taking pictures
of light sources are outstanding.
Add Review of SMC Pentax 67 / S-M-C Takumar / Super Takumar 6x7 300mm F4



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