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Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5 Review RSS Feed

Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5

Sharpness 
 9.4
Aberrations 
 8.6
Bokeh 
 9.3
Handling 
 9.2
Value 
 9.8
Reviews Views Date of last review
28 175,344 Sat July 8, 2017
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Recommended By Average Price Average User Rating
100% of reviewers $113.86 9.14
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5

Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
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Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
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Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
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Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
supersize
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
supersize
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
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Description:
Ths fast telephoto lens came in two optical designs, the earlier with five elements, the later with 6 elements. The 6 element design was used again in a K-mount lens.

The two Super-Multi-Coated variants support open-aperture metering with the Spotmatic F, ES and ESII.

Super-Takumar, 5 element design (first photo above and fist lens diagram):
Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 6 blades
Optics
5 elements, 4 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Stop-down Pin
Max. Aperture
F2.5
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
150 cm
Max. Magnification
0.11x
Filter Size
58 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 12 ° / 10 °
Full frame: 18 ° / 15 °
Hood
Metal hood
Case
Dedicated hard case
Lens Cap
Coating
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
66 x 80.5 mm
Weight
444 g
Production Years
1965 to 1971
Engraved Name
Super-Takumar 1:2.5/135
Product Code
43801
Notes
The hood is shared with the 200mm F4
Variants
1: Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5, 5 lens elements (this lens)
2: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, same optics as the Super
3: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, 6 lens elements


Super-Multi-Coated Takumar (model 1), 5 element design (second and fourth photo above and first lens diagram):
Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5 (model 1)
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 6 blades
Optics
5 elements, 4 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Open-aperture Metering
Max. Aperture
F2.5
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
150 cm
Max. Magnification
0.11x
Filter Size
58 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 12 ° / 10 °
Full frame: 18 ° / 15 °
Hood
Metal hood
Case
Dedicated hard case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
66 x 80.5 mm
Weight
449 g
Production Years
1971 to 1972
Engraved Name
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR 1:2.5/135
Product Code
43802
Notes
Open aperture metering with Spotmatic F, ES and ESII.
The hood is shared with the 200mm F4
Variants

1: Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5, 5 lens elements
2: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, same optics as the Super (this lens)
3: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, 6 lens elements



Super-Multi-Coated Takumar (model 2), 6 element design (third photo and second lens diagram):
Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5 (model 2)
Image Format
Full-frame / 35mm film
Lens Mount
M42
Aperture Ring
Yes
Diaphragm
Automatic, 8 blades
Optics
6 elements, 6 groups
Mount Variant
M42 Open-aperture Metering
Max. Aperture
F2.5
Min. Aperture
F22
Focusing
Manual
Min. Focus
150 cm
Max. Magnification
0.11x
Filter Size
58 mm
Internal Focus
No
Field of View (Diag. / Horiz.)

APS-C: 12 ° / 10 °
Full frame: 18 ° / 15 °
Hood
Metal hood
Case
Dedicated hard case
Lens Cap
Coating
SMC
Weather Sealing
No
Other Features
Diam x Length
66 x 80.5 mm
Weight
470 g
Production Years
1972 (start of production)
Engraved Name
Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR 1:2.5/135
Product Code
43812
Notes
This second model has 6 elements like its K-mount counterpart.
Open aperture metering with Spotmatic F, ES and ESII.
The hood is shared with the 200mm F4.
Variants

1: Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5, 5 lens elements
2: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, same optics as the Super
3: Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 135mm F2.5, 6 lens elements (this lens)

Features:
Manual FocusAperture RingFull-Frame SupportAdapter needed for DSLRsDiscontinued
Price History:



Add Review of Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5
Author:
Sort Reviews by: Date | Author | Rating | Recommendation | Likes (Descending) Showing Reviews 1-15 of 28
New Member

Registered: July, 2017
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 2
Lens Review Date: July 8, 2017 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: IQ, heft, reasonably sharp for portraits wide open
Cons: CA, manual focus takes practice
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 4    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Pentax K-5   

It was this very thread which made me take a closer look at this lens. I knew that the original 5-element model was the way to go, so a few months later, one arrived from Japan in absolutely mint condition, despite being older than me. I was so stoked that I bought it before I even got my Pentax camera.

What I'm not so impressed with?
It's heavy. Really heavy. The manual focus really puts your brain hands and patience to work, because you will burn through a lot of pictures with missed focus, until you "learn" to work this glass, but practice makes perfect.

What I like about this lens?
Everything else! The image quality and color rendition are astonishing to me. Yes, it's not tack sharp wide open, yes, there is fall off at the edges, yes, it has pretty pronounced CA wide open in bright backlight, but when you somehow add it all together it creates pure awesomeness. The pictures have this welcoming warmth to them, the bokeh is not overdone, yet so creamy. The focusing ring is massive with a very long throw, and make no mistake, you will need that long throw to get good focus, because wide open and up close, this thing has razor thin DOF.

This one is a keeper, no matter how hard it makes me work for my pictures.
If you are looking for the 5-element model, which is supposedly far superior to the later models, look on eBay and look at the Auto switch - its engraving has to say 42812, if it doesn't, it's not the 5-element model
   
New Member

Registered: May, 2016
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: May 19, 2016 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: profoundly sharp, reasonably fast, sold construction, great feel
Cons: heavy-ish
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: Canon 5D Classic   

Wonderfully sharp, nice bokeh, fantastic feel and heft to the lens. Will be taking much more with this lens for sure.

6/6 element, version 2 configuration, 48312 model






   
Site Supporter

Registered: August, 2007
Location: Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Posts: 314

6 users found this helpful
Lens Review Date: October 27, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $149.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Sharp, Smooth Focus, Great Handling, Solid Build
Cons: Minor CA
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: K3   

My copy is a version 2 and it is a great lens, rather than repeat what has already been said by other reviewers, I agree with all of the previous positive comments.
I did have a little trouble identifying the Version 2 copies on eBay and after reading a lot of various forum posts I have compiled a table of differences that make it easy to identify and find one.
Version 2 Version 1
Weight 470g 444g
A/M Switch Marking 43812 43802
Aperture Blades 8 6
DOF Scale "4" "Diamond"
Before infinity mark on focus scale 35m 30m
Serial Number Range 6138465 - 8203248 4723512 - 5848208

Some might say I paid a little too much, but mine is pristine, and I think this lens is bargain at even higher prices !
   
New Member

Registered: June, 2015
Location: Bern
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: October 5, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $90.00 | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: Very nice colors, good sharpness at f2.5 = ideal for Portraits
Cons: At "infinitely" not real sharp > 30 Meter
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 7    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 8    Value: 9    Camera Used: Canon 5D Mk1 (13MP)   

Sample picture: 2500 x 1670 Pixel (Windows: right click for higher resoltion)

   
Site Supporter

Registered: May, 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,299
Lens Review Date: July 13, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $160.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: well built, good contrast and resolution, accurate colors,
Cons: slightly heavy, tricky to focus hand-held
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: K-5IIs   

A few moths ago I purchased the "newer" version of this lens in a Bayonet mount thinking I could save some money by not having to purchase an Adapter. Unfortunately I was not very satisfied with that lens at all, especially being a manual prime lens, so I went on the used market again looking for a replacement.

I finally ran into a 6/6 version(6 elements/ 6 groups) on ebay, at a very reasonable price so I went for it ! I could not be happier with this lens. Every thing that was said about it on the reviews is true. Optically my copy showed extreme sharpness starting from post f2.5 to f16. The colors were well rendered and accurate. Bokeh was rather smooth, but not overdone like on other telephoto lenses.

The Multi-Coating is what really sets this lens apart from my previously purchased Bayonet mount which is now being used as a book-end, on one of the book shelves in my home. Not only can I point this lens in the direction of the sun without flaring, my pictures do not come out with that washed out look.

Optically the lens is worth a lot more than I paid for it, physically this lens is also a gem. At least my copy is ! Made from all metal it's a little heavy, but it balances well on my K-5 II. The focusing ring is buttery smooth throughout and the aperture stops are snappy, but well damped. What more can I say ? I know it's not AF but the focusing aid on the K-5II helps a lot, to the point where you can easily catch moving objects once you get used to it.
   
New Member

Registered: April, 2015
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: April 21, 2015 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $150.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Handling/Feel, Sharpness (v2), Color rendition, Aperture
Cons: Quite heavy, cumbersome lens hood
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Panasonic GH4   

This lens is a beauty: all metal construction, solid yet elegant, the finish is flawless. It feels fantastic and delivers beyond expectations: sharpness and color rendition are excellent through the entire aperture range, including wide open. Focusing is precise, buttery smooth and really easy thanks to the large focus ring. Aperture control is pleasant to use and easy to set.

For video:
- As mentioned, the focus ring is buttery smooth (yet not too loose: its spot on, just like all Takumars), which is great when you record video: focus pulls become child's play! The throw is a tiny bit long, but it has the benefit of allowing very precise focusing.
- Filter size is 58mm, which can be very practical if like me you use a GH4 and already have bought lenses like the 12-35 2.8 or the 35-100 2.8, which both have 58mm lens diameter. Your NDs and other filters will fit without adapter rings. Great!
- Aperture can very easily be de-clicked if you want that (I haven't done it)

A few caveats:
- No image stabilisation: use on a rig/tripod or suffer micro-jitter, further enhanced by crop factors on M43 cameras
- On M43, keep in mind that your lens becomes a 270mm f:2.5 lens with a normal adapter, or approx 200mm f:2.0 with a lens turbo / speedbooster. That's quite a bit of tele, maybe too much for some. If you use the additional 2x (no quality loss) tele mode for FullHD filming on the GH4, the lens turns into a 540mm or a 400mm lens!
- It's heavy (but not too cumbersome), especially with the added lens turbo / speedbooster and M42 adapter: you negate the benefit of lightweight M43 equipment.
- IMPORTANT: like Nikon lenses, the Takumars focus "opposite" to other brands like Panasonic, Canon, Minolta and cinema optics. This can be very confusing if you use different brands, especially when you film: focusing towards infinity (or close) will be inverted when compared to your cinema lenses! Gaaah!

All in all in my opinion a stunning lens if you're looking for a tele / long tele (M43 or APS-C).
   
New Member

Registered: November, 2014
Posts: 1
Lens Review Date: November 22, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: N/A | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: sharp wide open small in size and easy to use
Cons: those not focus as close as i would like it too
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: spotmatic , 5d mark 3   

this is the review of the second version of this lens 6 element one , i had the older version but the sharpness was not there especially on a full frame , this one is a different story it is sharp and has amazing bokeh and i shoot with it professional work beside my l canon primes it's sharp and has some Character to it that i find that newer lenses don't have , very good takumar one of the best .
   
Junior Member

Registered: October, 2014
Posts: 41
Lens Review Date: November 3, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $200.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: fast aperture, build quality, sharp, almost no aberrations on APS-C
Cons: strong longitudional CAs
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10   

The Asahi Super-Takumar 1:2.5/135 (earliest 1960s version) is a gorgeous fast telephoto lens when used on APS-C cameras. Mechanically it does not leave much to be desired - the lens is ergonomic, easy to use and optically competes with modern autofocus lenses designed for use with demanding digital sensors. The sharpness of the whole APS-C frame is very good already from F/2.5 and excellent on the subsequent apertures and the only visible optical aberration is longitudional CA. The background blur is very smooth and soft and could be achieved without much effort from the photographer (just set F/2.5 and move far enought from your subject). The only thing, perhaps, that you can blame the lens for is a bokeh hexagons from F/4 onwards.

My review of this lens with lots of samples at different apertures:

http://aflenses.net/reviews/a-subjective-look-at-asahi-super-takumar-f2-5-13...ujifilm-x-pro1
   
New Member

Registered: June, 2014
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 4
Lens Review Date: August 25, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $180.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Everything about the Lens! Grab it if you find one.
Cons: Not any. CA may be, can be solved in PP. It takes some time to learn the focus and working distance due to manual apetures.
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: Canon 650D   

I learned more about this lens through the previous Reviewers. Thanks to all.
This is my first Takumar Lens. I got the six element version (by checking the serial number). The Ebay seller did not mention about it. I bought it for $180 including postage. Little higher than average price mentioned here, but still worth. As many newbie photographers are really want to buy this lens, price is getting higher.

For Canon users: 1. Use Manual adapter (AF confirm chip not included). It is really Cheap. 2. Use the pixel peeking option to check the sharpness before releasing the shutter.

Since I am going to use the Takumar lenses for Video purposes, I have cropped the images in Cinemascope Ratio. Thank you for the Pentax forums where I came to know good things about these 40 year old lenses.

Edit: The serial number for this lens is 6579606.
   
New Member

Registered: January, 2014
Posts: 3
Lens Review Date: January 3, 2014 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $124.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Sharp, good bokeh. Feels great
Cons: Aberrations:
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: X-E2   

Got this before xmas after much research and hunting, but did not have much chance to try it out till today.

Have to say very pleased with results, handles great on x-e2 with grip, especially as i only paid 75 posted, seen then sell for twice the price

Note this is the V2 version

Long throw on MF can increase focusing time though.

Taken with X-E2 with -2 in camera sharpening -2 noise reduction

jpegs from camera with little sharpening in PS CC after resizing.

When i have the time will compare it to my other 135mm lenses - Super Tak 3.5, Auto chinon 2.8, Hanimex 3.5 12 blade

F2.5 1/400 EC =0.67 iso 2000


F2.5 1/400 EC =0.33 iso 4000
   
New Member

Registered: May, 2013
Location: Near Basle
Posts: 9
Lens Review Date: November 8, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $80.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: sharpness, bokeh
Cons:
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 10    Bokeh: 10    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Canon EOS 5D Mark 3   

My >S-M-C Takumar 135mm is Version 2< and looks like new. I like the lens even it is on par with modern lenses like Canon EF 135/2 L.

On my old lenses I like the "flaws" like flares, stars from the aperture blades or odd bokeh.
The S-M-C Takumar has none of these flaws. The bokeh is great and creamy. The lens doesn't have any CAs. Just the stars of the blades could be nicer. The contrast wide open is not as strong as my Nikkor-Q 13.5cm, but the sharpness is the same or even better.

I would buy this lens again.

>Here< the comparision between Nikkor 13.5cm and SMC 135/2.5.
   
Site Supporter

Registered: June, 2013
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 1,485

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: August 18, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $50.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: weight, grip, sharpness, speed, colour, ++Bokeh (V2) +Bokeh (V1)
Cons: -- CA (V1) - CA (V2) (minor)
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 10    Value: 10    Camera Used: K01   

I got very excited last night after realising that two super-multi-coated versions exist and I now have both.

Initially fueling my excitement was the knowledge that I bought well. Before knowing I had bought the rarer version 2 I knew that $50 was a great price (should be paying over $100). After realising the distinction one could say $50 was a steal (but I do not feel guilty as neither the seller nor I realised this at the time).

Let me restate my experience - buying the rarer version 2 yesterday in MINT condition was a complete accident. The motivation for buying this copy was for its cosmetically excellent condition and the desire to have some redundancy for spares or duplicates for the kids.

Now knowing that version 2 has its own aura I've changed the above thinking completely.


First I'll comment on version 1.

Version 1 blew me away. Sharpness and colour were outstanding. The speed was also remarkable. I could shoot indoors without flash and capture beautiful portraits. Outside, however, PF was evident on out wide where I was instead looking for nice bokeh (I got both, but of course only want one!). This was really only a problem in high contrast situations. Version 1 is a marvellous lens.

Now for version 2.

Version 2 weighs 10% more and that difference is noticeable (I like it as it offers me additional stability when focusing). Version 2 also has a little secret that no one has picked up yet (I think). Version 2 has eight aperture blades, unlike version 1 which has 6. With the extra glass and the blades version 2 delivers marginally better sharpness, better bokeh and substantially less PF.

Head to head performance

Version 1 scores an 8 with Version 2 being a clear winner scoring a smidgen over 9 (say 9.25 - not worthy of a 9.5).

When paying $50 each for these beauties you can bump up the scoring by 1

Change of thinking

The kids are no longer getting their hands on my version 2 unless of course I find more. If the latter eventuates then I will by those too and then they can have the pleasure! For now they can experiment with beautiful but inferior version 1

   
Site Supporter

Registered: February, 2013
Location: Spokane, WA
Posts: 118
Lens Review Date: May 24, 2013 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $90.00 | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Sharp.
Cons: Heavy
Sharpness: 10    Aberrations: 9    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 10    Camera Used: D7000   

This is is my favorite go to lens when I want the sharp pictures needed. I rarely see any CA when used with the hood as everyone should anyhow.


Memphis Belle by Jarrett_Hunt, on Flickr


Taxiing In by Jarrett_Hunt, on Flickr
   
Senior Member

Registered: September, 2012
Posts: 100

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: December 14, 2012 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $110.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Metal build, sharp, color, f2.5
Cons: rare
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 8    Value: 9    Camera Used: Canon 500D, Pentax K5   

Great build, like a weapon
Very good color and sharpness.
But when use on K5 or some APS-C camera, the 135mm seem not useful as on FF.
   
New Member

Registered: April, 2011
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 13

1 user found this helpful
Lens Review Date: June 5, 2012 I can recommend this lens: Yes | Price: $100.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Great build, extremely sharp, nice bokeh
Cons: For a lens as old as me, none!
Sharpness: 9    Aberrations: 8    Bokeh: 9    Handling: 9    Value: 10    Camera Used: Canon 60D   

I almost didn't buy this lens. I already own a Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5 and for it's age, it's okay but I didn't want another "okay" lens. The price was alright, the lens was in immaculate condition and it was the rarer version 2 SMC 135mm f/2.5 so I gambled and took the plunge. So glad I did!

It's tricky to focus handheld but when you nail it, boy is this lens sharp. The bokeh is so much better than the f/3.5 and being a tall guy with big hands, I like that the barrel of the f/2.5 is a little larger (it takes a 58mm filter).

I find with a lot the old Takumars it varies how much post-processing captured images require, quite often if it seems like the variations are based on where the light is in relation to the lens. Though this lens is much better with CA than my Super Tak 135mm f/3.5 there was still a little in some images, especially in the highlights.

This lens renders color remarkably well but I've found myself adding a touch more contrast to most of my images - this is probably more a personal preference thing than any fault with the lens.

Shooting a focal length of 135mm handheld on a crop sensor camera is not without it's challenges but when it works, it's extremely rewarding. I thought my 50mm f/1.4 and 105mm f/2.8 would rule the roost in terms of my favorite Taks but the 135mm f/2.5 is a very serious contender. It's a wonderful lens and I highly recommend it.
Add Review of Super-Multi-Coated TAKUMAR/Super-Takumar 135mm F2.5



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